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My team is the Web Technologies Team, and we call ourselves web developers.

 

We’re purposefully getting “web” out of our name for two reasons:

1.       Strategic: “web” is everywhere. It’s passé. Hence, no reason to call it out as a specialty.

2.       Internal: “web” in our names encourages coworkers to knee-jerk any request over to us just because they see the word “web” in it. That results in a lot of misdirected requests and pressure to accept work we shouldn’t be doing.

 

We may go with Software Development Team and assume new titles of Software Developers.

 

What do you think? Do you run into this problem at your institution?

 

Aren Cambre, '99, '03
Team Lead, Web Technologies Team
Office of Information Technology
Southern Methodist University

 

 

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Comments

Hi Aren,

 

I have absolutely felt this way from time to time.  “The web” is so ubiquitous it’s easy for colleagues to see a web team as owning anything out there.  Over the years, our group has gotten any number of requests to “fix” things on sites we don’t even own, institutionally.  I’m sure you can report the same experience.  “Web” or (ugh) “WEB” becomes a bit of a catch-all, especially when various systems start getting integrated.

 

Still I wonder if there isn’t a tradeoff in dropping the “web” portion of your title or team name?  If you become just “Developer” or “Software Developer,” for example, seems like it opens up to issues related to broader software development perhaps?  The line seems fuzzy.  Can you fix my VB issues in Excel?  J

 

Best regards,

 

Chuck

 

=======================================

Chuck Wyatt

Manager of Web Technical Services

Information Technology Services ▪ Clark University 

 

 

 

Message from cathy.oliva@vu.edu.au

Why do all the emails lately look like gobbledygook?

My team is the Web Technologies Team, and we call ourselves web developers.

 

We’re purposefully getting “web” out of our name for two reasons:

1.       Strategic: “web” is everywhere. It’s passé. Hence, no reason to call it out as a specialty.

2.       Internal: “web” in our names encourages coworkers to knee-jerk any request over to us just because they see the word “web” in it. That results in a lot of misdirected requests and pressure to accept work we shouldn’t be doing.

 

We may go with Software Development Team and assume new titles of Software Developers.

 

What do you think? Do you run into this problem at your institution?

 

Aren Cambre, '99, '03
Team Lead, Web Technologies Team
Office of Information Technology
Southern Methodist University

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Hi Aren,

 

I have absolutely felt this way from time to time.  “The web” is so ubiquitous it’s easy for colleagues to see a web team as owning anything out there.  Over the years, our group has gotten any number of requests to “fix” things on sites we don’t even own, institutionally.  I’m sure you can report the same experience.  “Web” or (ugh) “WEB” becomes a bit of a catch-all, especially when various systems start getting integrated.

 

Still I wonder if there isn’t a tradeoff in dropping the “web” portion of your title or team name?  If you become just “Developer” or “Software Developer,” for example, seems like it opens up to issues related to broader software development perhaps?  The line seems fuzzy.  Can you fix my VB issues in Excel?  J

 

Best regards,

 

Chuck

 

=======================================

Chuck Wyatt

Manager of Web Technical Services

Information Technology Services ▪ Clark University 

 

 

 

Ha! I am be happy for my team to occasionally help with difficult issues that nobody can figure out—provided that project due dates can be adjusted. J

 

As for the tradeoff, I see my team as a cross between marketing technology and general application development, albeit almost never traditional desktop application development as almost every new thing now is web-based. How do you find a name that encompasses both sets?

 

Whatever you call us, we definitely are not ERP developers. That is an entirely different skillset and way of thinking.

 

Aren

 

Message from cathy.oliva@vu.edu.au

Why do all the emails lately look like gobbledygook?
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