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Saw this blog post by Joshua Kim this morning at IHE and think he poses some interesting questions that may resonate with many on this list. 

http://www.insidehighered.com//blogs/technology-and-learning/women-and-academic-technology 

 My first question would be, do you agree with this observation that women seem to be better represented in Edtech leadership positions than in tech leadership positions as a whole?  Is he on target with his three premised reasons?

I know for me this is a reminder to look around next week while at Educause and pay attention to how many women are in senior leadership roles at their institutions and are taking active roles at the conference.

Regards,

Keith
***************************************************************************************************
Keith Boswell
Director of Information Technology and Engineering Computer Services
College of Engineering, North Carolina State University
Raleigh, North Carolina, 27695-7901

919-515-7930
***************************************************************************************************
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Keith—

 

ECAR is working on analyzing the results of our recent IT workforce survey.  The report will be published later this year.  Some of our results may help provide context for this discussion.  So, here are some sneak peeks on the gender distribution...

 

We asked about which of 10 IT domains (and an “other” category) they work in.  And yes, we do find more women in ed tech.  47% of our respondents in ed tech were female. That was the highest among all 10 domains.  More details below.

 

 

IT domain

Gender

Male

Female

Total

Administration and management of IT

69%

31%

100%

IT support services

56%

44%

100%

Educational technology services

53%

47%

100%

Research computing services

86%

14%

100%

Data center

67%

33%

100%

Communications infrastructure services

76%

24%

100%

Enterprise infrastructure and services

84%

16%

100%

Information security

80%

20%

100%

Identity management

69%

31%

100%

Information systems and applications

69%

31%

100%

Other IT domain

54%

46%

100%

 

We also asked about job families based on CUPA HR’s IT job classification. For the details of the job families, see the attached survey instrument.

 

Job Family

Gender

Male

Female

Total

Leadership

72%

28%

100%

Applications Professionals

70%

30%

100%

Database, Client Support, and Network Support Professionals

70%

30%

100%

Systems Support, Security, and Telecommunications Professionals

80%

20%

100%

Instructional Design/Media Professionals

49%

51%

100%

Other Professionals

52%

48%

100%

 

Hope this is helpful!

Pam Arroway Senior Statistician

EDUCAUSE
Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good
direct: 303.544.5678 | main: 303.449.4430 | educause.edu

 

 

Pam,

This is good stuff. Thanks so much for providing it.  The Edtech field certainly does stand out, both from the domain perspective as well as job family.  In addition to Joshua's three premises I'm wondering if some of the higher percentage in Edtech might be as a result of "following success?"  Do women go into Edtech because they see more women being successful in that domain than in the others?  IT support services is almost at the same percentage level.  Is this another area where women see women being successful and thus follow them in?

I'm interested in how those of us in leadership positions should be encouraging and supporting women in our field.  While one part of me wants to encourage as many women as possible to go where they can be successful another part of me is concerned about creating fields into which women can be pigeon-holed and marginalized.  We clearly need more women in all of these domains and there is no objective reason why women can't succeed in any of them.  So it's very important to me to understand, both as an IT leader and as a professional coach, why Edtech and to slightly lesser extent IT support services seem to attract women at a significantly higher rate than the other domains.

Regards,

Keith

***************************************************************************************************
Keith Boswell
Director of Information Technology and Engineering Computer Services
College of Engineering, North Carolina State University
Raleigh, North Carolina, 27695-7901

919-515-7930
***************************************************************************************************


Keith,

 

My theory is that many of the women started in another area of education and gravitated towards Edtech. I would be one of those individuals and I know of many more.

 

Barb

 

Barbara Anderson, Ed.D.|Senior Academic Technology Specialist|Roosevelt University|430 S. Michigan Ave #380|Chicago, IL 60605|312-341-2061|

banderson17@roosevelt.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Keith Boswell
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 11:59 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Pam,

 

This is good stuff. Thanks so much for providing it.  The Edtech field certainly does stand out, both from the domain perspective as well as job family.  In addition to Joshua's three premises I'm wondering if some of the higher percentage in Edtech might be as a result of "following success?"  Do women go into Edtech because they see more women being successful in that domain than in the others?  IT support services is almost at the same percentage level.  Is this another area where women see women being successful and thus follow them in?

 

I'm interested in how those of us in leadership positions should be encouraging and supporting women in our field.  While one part of me wants to encourage as many women as possible to go where they can be successful another part of me is concerned about creating fields into which women can be pigeon-holed and marginalized.  We clearly need more women in all of these domains and there is no objective reason why women can't succeed in any of them.  So it's very important to me to understand, both as an IT leader and as a professional coach, why Edtech and to slightly lesser extent IT support services seem to attract women at a significantly higher rate than the other domains.

 

Regards,

 

Keith


***************************************************************************************************

Keith Boswell

Director of Information Technology and Engineering Computer Services

College of Engineering, North Carolina State University

Raleigh, North Carolina, 27695-7901

 

919-515-7930

***************************************************************************************************

 

Barb, I agree with you. I remember in the 90's and early 2000's quite a few librarians were appearing at conferences like SIGUCCS with presentations about lab management and training as well.

Best,
Yasemin
--
E. Yasemin Tunc
Assistant Vice President for Academic Technology Solutions
Ball State University
Muncie, IN 47306
 (765) 285 5902



On 10/10/13 1:05 PM, "Barbara Anderson" <banderson17@ROOSEVELT.EDU> wrote:

Keith,

 

My theory is that many of the women started in another area of education and gravitated towards Edtech. I would be one of those individuals and I know of many more.

 

Barb

 

Barbara Anderson, Ed.D.|Senior Academic Technology Specialist|Roosevelt University|430 S. Michigan Ave #380|Chicago, IL 60605|312-341-2061|

banderson17@roosevelt.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Keith Boswell
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 11:59 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Pam,

 

This is good stuff. Thanks so much for providing it.  The Edtech field certainly does stand out, both from the domain perspective as well as job family.  In addition to Joshua's three premises I'm wondering if some of the higher percentage in Edtech might be as a result of "following success?"  Do women go into Edtech because they see more women being successful in that domain than in the others?  IT support services is almost at the same percentage level.  Is this another area where women see women being successful and thus follow them in?

 

I'm interested in how those of us in leadership positions should be encouraging and supporting women in our field.  While one part of me wants to encourage as many women as possible to go where they can be successful another part of me is concerned about creating fields into which women can be pigeon-holed and marginalized.  We clearly need more women in all of these domains and there is no objective reason why women can't succeed in any of them.  So it's very important to me to understand, both as an IT leader and as a professional coach, why Edtech and to slightly lesser extent IT support services seem to attract women at a significantly higher rate than the other domains.

 

Regards,

 

Keith


***************************************************************************************************

Keith Boswell

Director of Information Technology and Engineering Computer Services

College of Engineering, North Carolina State University

Raleigh, North Carolina, 27695-7901

 

919-515-7930

***************************************************************************************************

 

I love this conversation. Tomorrow we are having an event on Women in STEM fields as a result of being inspired after last May’s NCWIT Summit.   I have been engaging in these kinds of conversations quite a bit lately. 

 

Did folks read the recent NY Times article Why Are There Still So Few Women in Science? By Eileen Pollack.  It was published online on Oct 3.  If not, give it a read. While it focuses on science disciplines, the issues raised are very applicable. 

 

There is a quote from her that reads “.. the argument that women are underrepresented in the sciences because they know they will be happier in “people” fields strikes me as misdirected.”  For this thread, I would substitute IT Systems or Infrastructure for sciences and Support or EdTech for “people”.  I agree with the folks who talk about how and when one enters the field is a big factor.  Interestingly, though, men have entered the field at varying points in their career and still move into infrastructure roles. I have two network administrators on my team who started as desktop support.  Both men. 

 

Though I transitioned into my career in the 90s, I somehow managed to move into systems admin and network infrastructure.  I was usually the only woman in a sea of faces walking men through a cabling bid process or discussing a data center move.  My confidence and ability to do that has certainly grown over time.  I would say that I had one distinct advantage, however, and that is I attended Mount Holyoke, single sex college in MA.  Even now in my career, I can’t underscore enough how my education there laid the foundation for being successful in a male-dominated field. 

 

I am very interested in helping young women to develop that kind of confidence so pursuit of these positions doesn’t seem far-fetched.  Or, at the very least, if any young women I have had the chance to know ever end up with the opportunity to move into such a position, they will not let lack of confidence undermine them and know they can do it as well.

 

 

Karen Warren

Director of User and Technical Services

Wesleyan University

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Tunc, Yasemin
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 1:25 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Barb, I agree with you. I remember in the 90's and early 2000's quite a few librarians were appearing at conferences like SIGUCCS with presentations about lab management and training as well.

 

Best,

Yasemin

--

E. Yasemin Tunc

Assistant Vice President for Academic Technology Solutions

Ball State University

Muncie, IN 47306

 (765) 285 5902

 

 

 

On 10/10/13 1:05 PM, "Barbara Anderson" <banderson17@ROOSEVELT.EDU> wrote:

 

Keith,

 

My theory is that many of the women started in another area of education and gravitated towards Edtech. I would be one of those individuals and I know of many more.

 

Barb

 

Barbara Anderson, Ed.D.|Senior Academic Technology Specialist|Roosevelt University|430 S. Michigan Ave #380|Chicago, IL 60605|312-341-2061|

banderson17@roosevelt.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Keith Boswell
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 11:59 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Pam,

 

This is good stuff. Thanks so much for providing it.  The Edtech field certainly does stand out, both from the domain perspective as well as job family.  In addition to Joshua's three premises I'm wondering if some of the higher percentage in Edtech might be as a result of "following success?"  Do women go into Edtech because they see more women being successful in that domain than in the others?  IT support services is almost at the same percentage level.  Is this another area where women see women being successful and thus follow them in?

 

I'm interested in how those of us in leadership positions should be encouraging and supporting women in our field.  While one part of me wants to encourage as many women as possible to go where they can be successful another part of me is concerned about creating fields into which women can be pigeon-holed and marginalized.  We clearly need more women in all of these domains and there is no objective reason why women can't succeed in any of them.  So it's very important to me to understand, both as an IT leader and as a professional coach, why Edtech and to slightly lesser extent IT support services seem to attract women at a significantly higher rate than the other domains.

 

Regards,

 

Keith


***************************************************************************************************

Keith Boswell

Director of Information Technology and Engineering Computer Services

College of Engineering, North Carolina State University

Raleigh, North Carolina, 27695-7901

 

919-515-7930

***************************************************************************************************

 

I know this conversation has died down a bit, but further demographic analysis of the data from ECAR’s recent workforce study enhances the story told earlier today. Our data show the gender composition of IT leadership as follows:

 

IT leaders overall: 69% male, 31% female

Ed tech IT leaders: 59% male, 41% female

Non-ed tech IT leaders (all others): 70% male, 30% female

 

These data DO support the premise that there are more female leaders in ed tech (41%) than in other IT workforce domains (30%), and that gender distribution is more equitable for ed tech IT leaders than non-ed tech IT leaders. However, note that females are still outnumbered by males by more than 2:1 (69% males vs. 31% females) in IT leadership positions overall.

 

Find out more interesting facts about the IT workforce in ECAR’s workforce report to be published later this year. And if you’re in Anaheim for the annual conference next week, get a sneak peek into other workforce study findings at the presentation, “What You Need to Know About Today’s IT Workforce” (Thursday, October 17, 2013 at 1:30 PM PDT, room 304C/D: http://www.educause.edu/annual-conference/2013/what-you-need-know-about-todays-it-workforce).

 

ECAR Senior Research Analyst, Jacqueline Bichsel (cc’d on this note) is the principal investigator of this study and will be leading the EDU13 presentation as well as drafting the forthcoming ECAR report. Reach her at jbichsel@educause.edu if you have specific questions or insight about this work.

 

-Eden

 

Eden Dahlstrom  Director of Research

Data, Research, and Analytics
EDUCAUSE
Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good
1150 18th Street, NW, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20036
direct: 303.939.0330 | mobile: 530.903.2305 | educause.edu

 

 

 

 

This is very timely. I was just commenting on the same thing where I am. I work in Academic Technologies. 5 out of 7 people in our group are women and upper management is heavily female. I have been pondering this very same question.

 

I started in engineering, moved into education as faculty but found myself drawn back to technology. I recently completed my PhD which focused on women and STEM. One of the results of my study was that women want to work in areas that are meaningful and where they can make a difference. So, it may that working in education meets that need. It may also be more family friendly?

 

Great discussion!

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Warren, Karen
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 2:03 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

I love this conversation. Tomorrow we are having an event on Women in STEM fields as a result of being inspired after last May’s NCWIT Summit.   I have been engaging in these kinds of conversations quite a bit lately. 

 

Did folks read the recent NY Times article Why Are There Still So Few Women in Science? By Eileen Pollack.  It was published online on Oct 3.  If not, give it a read. While it focuses on science disciplines, the issues raised are very applicable. 

 

There is a quote from her that reads “.. the argument that women are underrepresented in the sciences because they know they will be happier in “people” fields strikes me as misdirected.”  For this thread, I would substitute IT Systems or Infrastructure for sciences and Support or EdTech for “people”.  I agree with the folks who talk about how and when one enters the field is a big factor.  Interestingly, though, men have entered the field at varying points in their career and still move into infrastructure roles. I have two network administrators on my team who started as desktop support.  Both men. 

 

Though I transitioned into my career in the 90s, I somehow managed to move into systems admin and network infrastructure.  I was usually the only woman in a sea of faces walking men through a cabling bid process or discussing a data center move.  My confidence and ability to do that has certainly grown over time.  I would say that I had one distinct advantage, however, and that is I attended Mount Holyoke, single sex college in MA.  Even now in my career, I can’t underscore enough how my education there laid the foundation for being successful in a male-dominated field. 

 

I am very interested in helping young women to develop that kind of confidence so pursuit of these positions doesn’t seem far-fetched.  Or, at the very least, if any young women I have had the chance to know ever end up with the opportunity to move into such a position, they will not let lack of confidence undermine them and know they can do it as well.

 

 

Karen Warren

Director of User and Technical Services

Wesleyan University

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Tunc, Yasemin
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 1:25 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Barb, I agree with you. I remember in the 90's and early 2000's quite a few librarians were appearing at conferences like SIGUCCS with presentations about lab management and training as well.

 

Best,

Yasemin

--

E. Yasemin Tunc

Assistant Vice President for Academic Technology Solutions

Ball State University

Muncie, IN 47306

 (765) 285 5902

 

 

 

On 10/10/13 1:05 PM, "Barbara Anderson" <banderson17@ROOSEVELT.EDU> wrote:

 

Keith,

 

My theory is that many of the women started in another area of education and gravitated towards Edtech. I would be one of those individuals and I know of many more.

 

Barb

 

Barbara Anderson, Ed.D.|Senior Academic Technology Specialist|Roosevelt University|430 S. Michigan Ave #380|Chicago, IL 60605|312-341-2061|

banderson17@roosevelt.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Keith Boswell
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 11:59 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Pam,

 

This is good stuff. Thanks so much for providing it.  The Edtech field certainly does stand out, both from the domain perspective as well as job family.  In addition to Joshua's three premises I'm wondering if some of the higher percentage in Edtech might be as a result of "following success?"  Do women go into Edtech because they see more women being successful in that domain than in the others?  IT support services is almost at the same percentage level.  Is this another area where women see women being successful and thus follow them in?

 

I'm interested in how those of us in leadership positions should be encouraging and supporting women in our field.  While one part of me wants to encourage as many women as possible to go where they can be successful another part of me is concerned about creating fields into which women can be pigeon-holed and marginalized.  We clearly need more women in all of these domains and there is no objective reason why women can't succeed in any of them.  So it's very important to me to understand, both as an IT leader and as a professional coach, why Edtech and to slightly lesser extent IT support services seem to attract women at a significantly higher rate than the other domains.

 

Regards,

 

Keith


***************************************************************************************************

Keith Boswell

Director of Information Technology and Engineering Computer Services

College of Engineering, North Carolina State University

Raleigh, North Carolina, 27695-7901

 

919-515-7930

***************************************************************************************************

 

Hi Patrice,

I am also interested in this topic of women in tech. I have worked in networking for 20 years. For years, I was the only woman in my department not including administrative support. I’m curious about your research. Are you suggesting that men  don’t want to work in areas that are meaningful and where they can also make a difference?

Kathleen

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Patrice Torcivia Prusko
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 3:52 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

This is very timely. I was just commenting on the same thing where I am. I work in Academic Technologies. 5 out of 7 people in our group are women and upper management is heavily female. I have been pondering this very same question.

 

I started in engineering, moved into education as faculty but found myself drawn back to technology. I recently completed my PhD which focused on women and STEM. One of the results of my study was that women want to work in areas that are meaningful and where they can make a difference. So, it may that working in education meets that need. It may also be more family friendly?

 

Great discussion!

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Warren, Karen
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 2:03 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

I love this conversation. Tomorrow we are having an event on Women in STEM fields as a result of being inspired after last May’s NCWIT Summit.   I have been engaging in these kinds of conversations quite a bit lately. 

 

Did folks read the recent NY Times article Why Are There Still So Few Women in Science? By Eileen Pollack.  It was published online on Oct 3.  If not, give it a read. While it focuses on science disciplines, the issues raised are very applicable. 

 

There is a quote from her that reads “.. the argument that women are underrepresented in the sciences because they know they will be happier in “people” fields strikes me as misdirected.”  For this thread, I would substitute IT Systems or Infrastructure for sciences and Support or EdTech for “people”.  I agree with the folks who talk about how and when one enters the field is a big factor.  Interestingly, though, men have entered the field at varying points in their career and still move into infrastructure roles. I have two network administrators on my team who started as desktop support.  Both men. 

 

Though I transitioned into my career in the 90s, I somehow managed to move into systems admin and network infrastructure.  I was usually the only woman in a sea of faces walking men through a cabling bid process or discussing a data center move.  My confidence and ability to do that has certainly grown over time.  I would say that I had one distinct advantage, however, and that is I attended Mount Holyoke, single sex college in MA.  Even now in my career, I can’t underscore enough how my education there laid the foundation for being successful in a male-dominated field. 

 

I am very interested in helping young women to develop that kind of confidence so pursuit of these positions doesn’t seem far-fetched.  Or, at the very least, if any young women I have had the chance to know ever end up with the opportunity to move into such a position, they will not let lack of confidence undermine them and know they can do it as well.

 

 

Karen Warren

Director of User and Technical Services

Wesleyan University

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Tunc, Yasemin
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 1:25 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Barb, I agree with you. I remember in the 90's and early 2000's quite a few librarians were appearing at conferences like SIGUCCS with presentations about lab management and training as well.

 

Best,

Yasemin

--

E. Yasemin Tunc

Assistant Vice President for Academic Technology Solutions

Ball State University

Muncie, IN 47306

 (765) 285 5902

 

 

 

On 10/10/13 1:05 PM, "Barbara Anderson" <banderson17@ROOSEVELT.EDU> wrote:

 

Keith,

 

My theory is that many of the women started in another area of education and gravitated towards Edtech. I would be one of those individuals and I know of many more.

 

Barb

 

Barbara Anderson, Ed.D.|Senior Academic Technology Specialist|Roosevelt University|430 S. Michigan Ave #380|Chicago, IL 60605|312-341-2061|

banderson17@roosevelt.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Keith Boswell
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 11:59 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Pam,

 

This is good stuff. Thanks so much for providing it.  The Edtech field certainly does stand out, both from the domain perspective as well as job family.  In addition to Joshua's three premises I'm wondering if some of the higher percentage in Edtech might be as a result of "following success?"  Do women go into Edtech because they see more women being successful in that domain than in the others?  IT support services is almost at the same percentage level.  Is this another area where women see women being successful and thus follow them in?

 

I'm interested in how those of us in leadership positions should be encouraging and supporting women in our field.  While one part of me wants to encourage as many women as possible to go where they can be successful another part of me is concerned about creating fields into which women can be pigeon-holed and marginalized.  We clearly need more women in all of these domains and there is no objective reason why women can't succeed in any of them.  So it's very important to me to understand, both as an IT leader and as a professional coach, why Edtech and to slightly lesser extent IT support services seem to attract women at a significantly higher rate than the other domains.

 

Regards,

 

Keith


***************************************************************************************************

Keith Boswell

Director of Information Technology and Engineering Computer Services

College of Engineering, North Carolina State University

Raleigh, North Carolina, 27695-7901

 

919-515-7930

***************************************************************************************************

 

Hello all!

My take seems to be slightly different, so for better or worse I'll share my thoughts. (For better or worse because there are so many positive spins contributed already, and mine might perhaps be more negative?)

One of my grandmothers was a seamstress (really a sewing machine operator in a factory) and a union organizer in the 30s, 40s, and 50s throughout the eastern seaboard. She told me that in her experience, business owners were happy to hire women to operate machinery, as long as they could pay them less than they'd paid men. Of course, during that process, "operating machinery" also changed to a job title like "seamstress".

When I was working at a help desk in the early 90s, it was considered highly technical work, wages were good, and I was the only woman on the staff. Over the course of the 90s I did notice that all three of those things changed: working at a help desk was considered more a service field and less technical, wages were not as good, and staff were much more balanced according to gender.

(This is location-specific; to this day, though 3 out of 4 IT directors at my institution are women, there are no women working at the staff help desk directly providing technical support. We have worked hard to balance gender [along with other diversity goals] in my service desks for faculty and students. And it took years. There's certainly more than the hiring manager's attitude at work, don't get me wrong.)

I've since learned that something similar happened with moviemaking at the end of the 19th century. Many film cutters/editors were women in the 1890s; as they moved through the ranks, there were actually quite a few women directors of movies in the 00s and 10s. As movies became big-budget affairs and directing and editing came to be seen as more technical and less piecework, men took over in those fields, to the situation we have today, where the Academy Award for Best Director (Academy Awards began in 1929) has only once been given to a woman director (only 3 directors who are women have ever been nominated).

You can see it in other fields: secretarial work was dominated by men throughout the 19th century; becomes a pink-collar job when women are allowed to do it, completely reversed, almost entirely dominated by women; also garners lower salaries (the male secretaries, of course, had been expected to support a family on that salary; the women were assumed to be providing "a second salary" to a family unit); also becomes less highly ranked in terms of its difficulty and technicality. Etc. etc.

Richard Katz, I believe it was but don't quote me, once gave a talk at an EDUCAUSE event where he drew attention to the fact that the women who had been data operators in the 60s (not unlike my mother, who started in data entry at Wang) became directors of academic computing in the 80s (not unlike my mother, who was a Unix sysadmin for DARPA at that time). When the title became "CIO", was considered highly technical and business-oriented, and not coincidentally both managed and commanded a lot more money, women's representations in those ranks plummeted.

I would be very interested to know how salaries among women in IT management compare, even at the same "level" (director level?), between something like the educational technology field where women's participation is much higher, to something like the security field where women's participation is much lower. I'd also love to see information on how "technical" the appropriate supervisor considered the work to be, that was completed by everyone at that level across those fields. I suspect "educational technology" would be perceived as less "technical" than some other fields.

Happy Thursday,

Judith
------
Judith Tabron, Ph.D., Director, Faculty Computing Services and Student Computing Services
Hofstra University
judith.tabron@hofstra.edu | 516-463-6316

A SYMPODIUM IS A SMARTBOARD! Check out the All Faculty class in Blackboard for workshop schedules on how to use them, and more!

On Oct 10, 2013, at 3:51 PM, Patrice Torcivia Prusko wrote:

This is very timely. I was just commenting on the same thing where I am. I work in Academic Technologies. 5 out of 7 people in our group are women and upper management is heavily female. I have been pondering this very same question.
 
I started in engineering, moved into education as faculty but found myself drawn back to technology. I recently completed my PhD which focused on women and STEM. One of the results of my study was that women want to work in areas that are meaningful and where they can make a difference. So, it may that working in education meets that need. It may also be more family friendly?
 
Great discussion!
 
From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Warren, Karen
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 2:03 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions
 
I love this conversation. Tomorrow we are having an event on Women in STEM fields as a result of being inspired after last May’s NCWIT Summit.   I have been engaging in these kinds of conversations quite a bit lately. 
 
Did folks read the recent NY Times article Why Are There Still So Few Women in Science? By Eileen Pollack.  It was published online on Oct 3.  If not, give it a read. While it focuses on science disciplines, the issues raised are very applicable. 
 
There is a quote from her that reads “.. the argument that women are underrepresented in the sciences because they know they will be happier in “people” fields strikes me as misdirected.”  For this thread, I would substitute IT Systems or Infrastructure for sciences and Support or EdTech for “people”.  I agree with the folks who talk about how and when one enters the field is a big factor.  Interestingly, though, men have entered the field at varying points in their career and still move into infrastructure roles. I have two network administrators on my team who started as desktop support.  Both men. 
 
Though I transitioned into my career in the 90s, I somehow managed to move into systems admin and network infrastructure.  I was usually the only woman in a sea of faces walking men through a cabling bid process or discussing a data center move.  My confidence and ability to do that has certainly grown over time.  I would say that I had one distinct advantage, however, and that is I attended Mount Holyoke, single sex college in MA.  Even now in my career, I can’t underscore enough how my education there laid the foundation for being successful in a male-dominated field. 
 
I am very interested in helping young women to develop that kind of confidence so pursuit of these positions doesn’t seem far-fetched.  Or, at the very least, if any young women I have had the chance to know ever end up with the opportunity to move into such a position, they will not let lack of confidence undermine them and know they can do it as well.
 
 
Karen Warren
Director of User and Technical Services
Wesleyan University
 
 
 
From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDUOn Behalf Of Tunc, Yasemin
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 1:25 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions
 
Barb, I agree with you. I remember in the 90's and early 2000's quite a few librarians were appearing at conferences like SIGUCCS with presentations about lab management and training as well.
 
Best,
Yasemin
--
E. Yasemin Tunc
Assistant Vice President for Academic Technology Solutions
Ball State University
Muncie, IN 47306
 (765) 285 5902
 
 
 
On 10/10/13 1:05 PM, "Barbara Anderson" <banderson17@ROOSEVELT.EDU> wrote:
 
Keith,
 
My theory is that many of the women started in another area of education and gravitated towards Edtech. I would be one of those individuals and I know of many more.
 
Barb
 
Barbara Anderson, Ed.D.|Senior Academic Technology Specialist|Roosevelt University|430 S. Michigan Ave #380|Chicago, IL 60605|312-341-2061|
 
From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDUOn Behalf Of Keith Boswell
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 11:59 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions
 
Pam,
 
This is good stuff. Thanks so much for providing it.  The Edtech field certainly does stand out, both from the domain perspective as well as job family.  In addition to Joshua's three premises I'm wondering if some of the higher percentage in Edtech might be as a result of "following success?"  Do women go into Edtech because they see more women being successful in that domain than in the others?  IT support services is almost at the same percentage level.  Is this another area where women see women being successful and thus follow them in?
 
I'm interested in how those of us in leadership positions should be encouraging and supporting women in our field.  While one part of me wants to encourage as many women as possible to go where they can be successful another part of me is concerned about creating fields into which women can be pigeon-holed and marginalized.  We clearly need more women in all of these domains and there is no objective reason why women can't succeed in any of them.  So it's very important to me to understand, both as an IT leader and as a professional coach, why Edtech and to slightly lesser extent IT support services seem to attract women at a significantly higher rate than the other domains.
 
Regards,
 
Keith

***************************************************************************************************
Keith Boswell
Director of Information Technology and Engineering Computer Services
College of Engineering, North Carolina State University
Raleigh, North Carolina, 27695-7901
 
919-515-7930
***************************************************************************************************

 

First, I enjoy reading Josh Kim’s blog and found this article interesting.   Second, I have had the pleasure of working with Josh as I am one of the individuals he mentions as one of his supervisorsJ 

 

I agree with one of the premises mentioned in the blog, that some individuals who enter this field do so because they have had a non-linear career path and needed flexibility.   I am one of those individuals that needed some flexibility when my children were very young and I arrived at my current position in a non-linear manner. 

 

I also agree with Barb’s comment below that individuals have gravitated towards this field from other areas of education.   

 

I think Pam’s data is very compelling in terms of where women are working in educational technology.  I do not have research to support why there seems to be more women in ed tech positions rather than more traditional IT positions, however, I think one of the most important assets for career development is a mentor.  I was fortunate to have had two mentors during my career and I often tell young adults that one of the best avenues for success is to work for someone who will act as a mentor.  I have attempted to organize my current staff so that I mentor my direct reports, my direct reports mentor their staff and my most junior employees have staff mentors as well as their direct supervisor for support.  One of the most important responsibility for any manager is to be a role model for their staff and to act as a mentor to junior members. 

 

Sincerely,

Cindy

 

Cynthia Gallatin

Associate VP for Online Programs

Quinnipiac University Online

275 Mt Carmel Avenue

Hamden, CT  06518

(203) 582-8521

Cynthia.Gallatin@quinnipiac.edu

http://www.quinnipiac.edu/quonline  

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Barbara Anderson
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 1:05 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Keith,

 

My theory is that many of the women started in another area of education and gravitated towards Edtech. I would be one of those individuals and I know of many more.

 

Barb

 

Barbara Anderson, Ed.D.|Senior Academic Technology Specialist|Roosevelt University|430 S. Michigan Ave #380|Chicago, IL 60605|312-341-2061|

banderson17@roosevelt.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Keith Boswell
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 11:59 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Pam,

 

This is good stuff. Thanks so much for providing it.  The Edtech field certainly does stand out, both from the domain perspective as well as job family.  In addition to Joshua's three premises I'm wondering if some of the higher percentage in Edtech might be as a result of "following success?"  Do women go into Edtech because they see more women being successful in that domain than in the others?  IT support services is almost at the same percentage level.  Is this another area where women see women being successful and thus follow them in?

 

I'm interested in how those of us in leadership positions should be encouraging and supporting women in our field.  While one part of me wants to encourage as many women as possible to go where they can be successful another part of me is concerned about creating fields into which women can be pigeon-holed and marginalized.  We clearly need more women in all of these domains and there is no objective reason why women can't succeed in any of them.  So it's very important to me to understand, both as an IT leader and as a professional coach, why Edtech and to slightly lesser extent IT support services seem to attract women at a significantly higher rate than the other domains.

 

Regards,

 

Keith


***************************************************************************************************

Keith Boswell

Director of Information Technology and Engineering Computer Services

College of Engineering, North Carolina State University

Raleigh, North Carolina, 27695-7901

 

919-515-7930

***************************************************************************************************

 

Hi Kathleen, My research only looked at women so I’m not making any suggestions related to men. I do think a comparison study would be interesting and may shed light on that question. My study focused on adult women returning to school to study STEM. Each of the women in my study had excelled in STEM during their K-12 years but felt they received no real guidance as to what to do with it. For a variety of reasons they didn’t finish college the first time. For each of them there was a moment where they connected their passion for STEM with a meaningful career path and that is what drove them to return to school.

 

A lack of guidance from guidance counselors was cited by all the women in my study so this may possibly lead to the non-linear career path?

 

Patrice

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Murphy, Kathleen
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 4:31 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Hi Patrice,

I am also interested in this topic of women in tech. I have worked in networking for 20 years. For years, I was the only woman in my department not including administrative support. I’m curious about your research. Are you suggesting that men  don’t want to work in areas that are meaningful and where they can also make a difference?

Kathleen

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Patrice Torcivia Prusko
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 3:52 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

This is very timely. I was just commenting on the same thing where I am. I work in Academic Technologies. 5 out of 7 people in our group are women and upper management is heavily female. I have been pondering this very same question.

 

I started in engineering, moved into education as faculty but found myself drawn back to technology. I recently completed my PhD which focused on women and STEM. One of the results of my study was that women want to work in areas that are meaningful and where they can make a difference. So, it may that working in education meets that need. It may also be more family friendly?

 

Great discussion!

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Warren, Karen
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 2:03 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

I love this conversation. Tomorrow we are having an event on Women in STEM fields as a result of being inspired after last May’s NCWIT Summit.   I have been engaging in these kinds of conversations quite a bit lately. 

 

Did folks read the recent NY Times article Why Are There Still So Few Women in Science? By Eileen Pollack.  It was published online on Oct 3.  If not, give it a read. While it focuses on science disciplines, the issues raised are very applicable. 

 

There is a quote from her that reads “.. the argument that women are underrepresented in the sciences because they know they will be happier in “people” fields strikes me as misdirected.”  For this thread, I would substitute IT Systems or Infrastructure for sciences and Support or EdTech for “people”.  I agree with the folks who talk about how and when one enters the field is a big factor.  Interestingly, though, men have entered the field at varying points in their career and still move into infrastructure roles. I have two network administrators on my team who started as desktop support.  Both men. 

 

Though I transitioned into my career in the 90s, I somehow managed to move into systems admin and network infrastructure.  I was usually the only woman in a sea of faces walking men through a cabling bid process or discussing a data center move.  My confidence and ability to do that has certainly grown over time.  I would say that I had one distinct advantage, however, and that is I attended Mount Holyoke, single sex college in MA.  Even now in my career, I can’t underscore enough how my education there laid the foundation for being successful in a male-dominated field. 

 

I am very interested in helping young women to develop that kind of confidence so pursuit of these positions doesn’t seem far-fetched.  Or, at the very least, if any young women I have had the chance to know ever end up with the opportunity to move into such a position, they will not let lack of confidence undermine them and know they can do it as well.

 

 

Karen Warren

Director of User and Technical Services

Wesleyan University

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Tunc, Yasemin
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 1:25 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Barb, I agree with you. I remember in the 90's and early 2000's quite a few librarians were appearing at conferences like SIGUCCS with presentations about lab management and training as well.

 

Best,

Yasemin

--

E. Yasemin Tunc

Assistant Vice President for Academic Technology Solutions

Ball State University

Muncie, IN 47306

 (765) 285 5902

 

 

 

On 10/10/13 1:05 PM, "Barbara Anderson" <banderson17@ROOSEVELT.EDU> wrote:

 

Keith,

 

My theory is that many of the women started in another area of education and gravitated towards Edtech. I would be one of those individuals and I know of many more.

 

Barb

 

Barbara Anderson, Ed.D.|Senior Academic Technology Specialist|Roosevelt University|430 S. Michigan Ave #380|Chicago, IL 60605|312-341-2061|

banderson17@roosevelt.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Keith Boswell
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 11:59 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Pam,

 

This is good stuff. Thanks so much for providing it.  The Edtech field certainly does stand out, both from the domain perspective as well as job family.  In addition to Joshua's three premises I'm wondering if some of the higher percentage in Edtech might be as a result of "following success?"  Do women go into Edtech because they see more women being successful in that domain than in the others?  IT support services is almost at the same percentage level.  Is this another area where women see women being successful and thus follow them in?

 

I'm interested in how those of us in leadership positions should be encouraging and supporting women in our field.  While one part of me wants to encourage as many women as possible to go where they can be successful another part of me is concerned about creating fields into which women can be pigeon-holed and marginalized.  We clearly need more women in all of these domains and there is no objective reason why women can't succeed in any of them.  So it's very important to me to understand, both as an IT leader and as a professional coach, why Edtech and to slightly lesser extent IT support services seem to attract women at a significantly higher rate than the other domains.

 

Regards,

 

Keith


***************************************************************************************************

Keith Boswell

Director of Information Technology and Engineering Computer Services

College of Engineering, North Carolina State University

Raleigh, North Carolina, 27695-7901

 

919-515-7930

***************************************************************************************************

 

This is an interesting blog post, thanks for bringing it to the discussion! 

I have always being curious about how women  participation in IT has changed over the years.  Interesting to remark that most of us base our opinions in experience, there is little data out there and the ECAR study is a great step ahead. I am a data person so I am uncomfortable making generalizations from my experience. 

I agree that having a nonlinear – flexible career path is a good incentive for people to move to IT in education.   Although I love education, it is a great incentive for me to stay in the field.  Non-salary benefits like time off, working hours, sick time are very popular for women (and man), in certain age range looking to move up or stay in the field while balancing home life.

The other aspect to consider is that IT has become less about tech skills.   The blog talks about social intelligence but  overall as IT has evolved into a “consumer” friendly field,  hard core technical skills (although still important) are moving towards a smaller part of our overall IT department function.  Cost, the cloud and difficulty to hire and retain hard core technical staff is making easier to outsource a lot of those functions.  In this new world of IT, the transition for non-technical staff into  technology may be easier than the other way around. We are seeing positions for business analyst and project managers becoming popular.  Without that technical barrier, and since education is a field where women participate heavily, is not strange that number of women transitioning into technology and specially academic technology is higher.  Last but not least, education is refocusing its strategies into academic technology from decades of building its IT infrastructure.  That adds up, there are a lot of positions to be filled, where do we get the talent? 

The transition to leadership positions is another interesting topic that adds another layer to the discussion.  Wayne Brown published an interesting research at the Center for Higher Education CIO Studies about the number of women transitioning to CIO from tech leadership positions. http://www.informationweek.com/education/leadership/in-higher-education-fewer-women-graduate/240156884

 

Great topic!

Looking forward seeing you in Anaheim!

 

Maria Piret

Director Information Systems

Lynn University

3601 N. Military Trail

Boca Raton, FL 33431

561-237-7355

mpiret@lynn.edu

Google+ / LinkedIn

 

Please consider the environment before printing.

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Patrice,

Thanks for sharing. I can personally relate to a lack of guidance at high school and at college. My parents were not much help. In fairness, my mother never attended college and my dad worked constantly to support his 5 kids. Nor did I have much of a relationship with my (male) faculty advisor. I had a love affair with math as a girl but in hindsight I chose the wrong engineering specialty for me.  I finished my degree because I was already knee deep in debt but I decided to immediately return to graduate school for a MBA. I got a student assistant job with the telecommunications department on campus and I never left the university. UB offered me employment after graduation. Opportunity, not interest was my primary motivator for accepting. I think it’s a different world today. My daughter has been exposed to tech classes in 6th and 7th grade. Today’s campus climate is also more open about diversity so I suspect that faculty are more sensitive.

This has been a great discussion.

Kathleen

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Patrice Torcivia Prusko
Sent: Friday, October 11, 2013 8:48 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Hi Kathleen, My research only looked at women so I’m not making any suggestions related to men. I do think a comparison study would be interesting and may shed light on that question. My study focused on adult women returning to school to study STEM. Each of the women in my study had excelled in STEM during their K-12 years but felt they received no real guidance as to what to do with it. For a variety of reasons they didn’t finish college the first time. For each of them there was a moment where they connected their passion for STEM with a meaningful career path and that is what drove them to return to school.

 

A lack of guidance from guidance counselors was cited by all the women in my study so this may possibly lead to the non-linear career path?

 

Patrice

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Murphy, Kathleen
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 4:31 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Hi Patrice,

I am also interested in this topic of women in tech. I have worked in networking for 20 years. For years, I was the only woman in my department not including administrative support. I’m curious about your research. Are you suggesting that men  don’t want to work in areas that are meaningful and where they can also make a difference?

Kathleen

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Patrice Torcivia Prusko
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 3:52 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

This is very timely. I was just commenting on the same thing where I am. I work in Academic Technologies. 5 out of 7 people in our group are women and upper management is heavily female. I have been pondering this very same question.

 

I started in engineering, moved into education as faculty but found myself drawn back to technology. I recently completed my PhD which focused on women and STEM. One of the results of my study was that women want to work in areas that are meaningful and where they can make a difference. So, it may that working in education meets that need. It may also be more family friendly?

 

Great discussion!

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Warren, Karen
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 2:03 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

I love this conversation. Tomorrow we are having an event on Women in STEM fields as a result of being inspired after last May’s NCWIT Summit.   I have been engaging in these kinds of conversations quite a bit lately. 

 

Did folks read the recent NY Times article Why Are There Still So Few Women in Science? By Eileen Pollack.  It was published online on Oct 3.  If not, give it a read. While it focuses on science disciplines, the issues raised are very applicable. 

 

There is a quote from her that reads “.. the argument that women are underrepresented in the sciences because they know they will be happier in “people” fields strikes me as misdirected.”  For this thread, I would substitute IT Systems or Infrastructure for sciences and Support or EdTech for “people”.  I agree with the folks who talk about how and when one enters the field is a big factor.  Interestingly, though, men have entered the field at varying points in their career and still move into infrastructure roles. I have two network administrators on my team who started as desktop support.  Both men. 

 

Though I transitioned into my career in the 90s, I somehow managed to move into systems admin and network infrastructure.  I was usually the only woman in a sea of faces walking men through a cabling bid process or discussing a data center move.  My confidence and ability to do that has certainly grown over time.  I would say that I had one distinct advantage, however, and that is I attended Mount Holyoke, single sex college in MA.  Even now in my career, I can’t underscore enough how my education there laid the foundation for being successful in a male-dominated field. 

 

I am very interested in helping young women to develop that kind of confidence so pursuit of these positions doesn’t seem far-fetched.  Or, at the very least, if any young women I have had the chance to know ever end up with the opportunity to move into such a position, they will not let lack of confidence undermine them and know they can do it as well.

 

 

Karen Warren

Director of User and Technical Services

Wesleyan University

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Tunc, Yasemin
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 1:25 PM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Barb, I agree with you. I remember in the 90's and early 2000's quite a few librarians were appearing at conferences like SIGUCCS with presentations about lab management and training as well.

 

Best,

Yasemin

--

E. Yasemin Tunc

Assistant Vice President for Academic Technology Solutions

Ball State University

Muncie, IN 47306

 (765) 285 5902

 

 

 

On 10/10/13 1:05 PM, "Barbara Anderson" <banderson17@ROOSEVELT.EDU> wrote:

 

Keith,

 

My theory is that many of the women started in another area of education and gravitated towards Edtech. I would be one of those individuals and I know of many more.

 

Barb

 

Barbara Anderson, Ed.D.|Senior Academic Technology Specialist|Roosevelt University|430 S. Michigan Ave #380|Chicago, IL 60605|312-341-2061|

banderson17@roosevelt.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Keith Boswell
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 11:59 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Pam,

 

This is good stuff. Thanks so much for providing it.  The Edtech field certainly does stand out, both from the domain perspective as well as job family.  In addition to Joshua's three premises I'm wondering if some of the higher percentage in Edtech might be as a result of "following success?"  Do women go into Edtech because they see more women being successful in that domain than in the others?  IT support services is almost at the same percentage level.  Is this another area where women see women being successful and thus follow them in?

 

I'm interested in how those of us in leadership positions should be encouraging and supporting women in our field.  While one part of me wants to encourage as many women as possible to go where they can be successful another part of me is concerned about creating fields into which women can be pigeon-holed and marginalized.  We clearly need more women in all of these domains and there is no objective reason why women can't succeed in any of them.  So it's very important to me to understand, both as an IT leader and as a professional coach, why Edtech and to slightly lesser extent IT support services seem to attract women at a significantly higher rate than the other domains.

 

Regards,

 

Keith


***************************************************************************************************

Keith Boswell

Director of Information Technology and Engineering Computer Services

College of Engineering, North Carolina State University

Raleigh, North Carolina, 27695-7901

 

919-515-7930

***************************************************************************************************

 

I'm enjoying reading the comments on this thread. I came out of high-tech startups before I got into higher ed, and was always the only woman around the leadership table and was one of few women in the company, especially in the early days of each startup. And, I was on the marketing side, NOT technical (although I did do product marketing). When I moved into HE leadership, in my first institution there were 2 of us who were female directors of (I think) 11 total, but we were in the "fluffier" fields -- user support for one and relationship/project management for the other. 

Today I have 8 of 21 women on my team, including me as the CIO. The interesting part is that we've made 3 programmer hires recently, and ALL 3 have been women. It's shocked me, to tell you the truth. I'm happy to have that, but I've never seen that many female candidates for programming positions before.

So it makes me wonder, is some of this geography-based? Are there regions where you might see higher concentrations of women in particular fields, relative to other regions?

Rae


Rae and others—

 

ECAR studies don’t typically garner enough data to do much geographic analysis.  We can usually only afford to slice the data in very large regions that don’t show any effect, probably because they’re too broad. In some studies, we’ve also looked at the location of the institution (urban, suburban or rural) and haven’t found much.

 

Earlier in this thread, someone was asking about salaries and we do have salary data in our upcoming workforce report and presentation.  As my colleague already mentioned, please consider attending Jackie Bichsel’s talk on this: “What You Need to Know About Today’s IT Workforce” (Thursday, October 17, 2013 at 1:30 PM PDT, room 304C/D: http://www.educause.edu/annual-conference/2013/what-you-need-know-about-todays-it-workforce).

 

ECAR has also recently published related research. As was mentioned in this thread, some of this is covered by Wayne Brown’s work with CHECS. The CIO and Tech Leader CHECS reports are available to ECAR subscribers.  Though the link given previously is more on point with this discussion.

 

In addition, we published a report by Beth Clark: “Gender Diversity Among Higher Education CIOs”. This report was based on her doctoral research and while it focuses on CIOs, I think many of the findings relate to tech leaders more generally. This report was just published in September, so won’t be publicly available for a few months.  However, we published a research bulletin from her on this topic last year, that is freely available now.

 

This is obviously a shameless plug for ECAR work.  I hope you will seriously consider responding to any survey requests you get from us!  We can’t do the research without your input!  We also welcome your input on the research we are doing (and not doing).

 

Thanks!

Pam

 

Pam Arroway Senior Statistician

EDUCAUSE
Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good
direct: 303.544.5678 | main: 303.449.4430 | educause.edu

 

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Raechelle Clemmons
Sent: Friday, October 11, 2013 7:23 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

I'm enjoying reading the comments on this thread. I came out of high-tech startups before I got into higher ed, and was always the only woman around the leadership table and was one of few women in the company, especially in the early days of each startup. And, I was on the marketing side, NOT technical (although I did do product marketing). When I moved into HE leadership, in my first institution there were 2 of us who were female directors of (I think) 11 total, but we were in the "fluffier" fields -- user support for one and relationship/project management for the other. 

 

Today I have 8 of 21 women on my team, including me as the CIO. The interesting part is that we've made 3 programmer hires recently, and ALL 3 have been women. It's shocked me, to tell you the truth. I'm happy to have that, but I've never seen that many female candidates for programming positions before.

 

So it makes me wonder, is some of this geography-based? Are there regions where you might see higher concentrations of women in particular fields, relative to other regions?

 

Rae

 

Hello all

 

What a great thread!  It’s also really great to get links to so many articles.

 

A lot of the comments refer to lack of guidance early in career, or lack of focus on STEM fields in middle and high school.  That all resonates with me and I completely agree that the focus is changing – there are many efforts to reach out to girls to engage them in STEM fields, far more that when I was young!  It is critical that we increase the pipeline of girls coming into technical fields, not only because it’s the right thing to do, but because we will continue to have demand for these skills that we simply can’t meet, especially if the field feels closed off to half of the population.  I’d like to encourage all of us to participate in these outreach efforts to girls and young women.  There was an interesting thread a few months ago on this listserv started by someone (my apologies; I can’t remember her name) who was going to speak at a local high school.  Her comments inspired me to get involved in outreach to our local schools; I encourage everyone else to do the same thing to inspire the next generation of women in IT!

 

Helen

 

Helen Norris

Associate Chief Information Officer

Information Resources & Technology

California State University, Sacramento

Sacramento, CA  95819

helen.norris@csus.edu

(916) 278-7706

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Pam Arroway
Sent: Friday, October 11, 2013 7:40 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Rae and others—

 

ECAR studies don’t typically garner enough data to do much geographic analysis.  We can usually only afford to slice the data in very large regions that don’t show any effect, probably because they’re too broad. In some studies, we’ve also looked at the location of the institution (urban, suburban or rural) and haven’t found much.

 

Earlier in this thread, someone was asking about salaries and we do have salary data in our upcoming workforce report and presentation.  As my colleague already mentioned, please consider attending Jackie Bichsel’s talk on this: “What You Need to Know About Today’s IT Workforce” (Thursday, October 17, 2013 at 1:30 PM PDT, room 304C/D: http://www.educause.edu/annual-conference/2013/what-you-need-know-about-todays-it-workforce).

 

ECAR has also recently published related research. As was mentioned in this thread, some of this is covered by Wayne Brown’s work with CHECS. The CIO and Tech Leader CHECS reports are available to ECAR subscribers.  Though the link given previously is more on point with this discussion.

 

In addition, we published a report by Beth Clark: “Gender Diversity Among Higher Education CIOs”. This report was based on her doctoral research and while it focuses on CIOs, I think many of the findings relate to tech leaders more generally. This report was just published in September, so won’t be publicly available for a few months.  However, we published a research bulletin from her on this topic last year, that is freely available now.

 

This is obviously a shameless plug for ECAR work.  I hope you will seriously consider responding to any survey requests you get from us!  We can’t do the research without your input!  We also welcome your input on the research we are doing (and not doing).

 

Thanks!

Pam

 

Pam Arroway Senior Statistician

EDUCAUSE
Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good
direct: 303.544.5678 | main: 303.449.4430 | educause.edu

 

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Raechelle Clemmons
Sent: Friday, October 11, 2013 7:23 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

I'm enjoying reading the comments on this thread. I came out of high-tech startups before I got into higher ed, and was always the only woman around the leadership table and was one of few women in the company, especially in the early days of each startup. And, I was on the marketing side, NOT technical (although I did do product marketing). When I moved into HE leadership, in my first institution there were 2 of us who were female directors of (I think) 11 total, but we were in the "fluffier" fields -- user support for one and relationship/project management for the other. 

 

Today I have 8 of 21 women on my team, including me as the CIO. The interesting part is that we've made 3 programmer hires recently, and ALL 3 have been women. It's shocked me, to tell you the truth. I'm happy to have that, but I've never seen that many female candidates for programming positions before.

 

So it makes me wonder, is some of this geography-based? Are there regions where you might see higher concentrations of women in particular fields, relative to other regions?

 

Rae

 

Message from eamani@exchange.fullerton.edu

Dear all,

As said by other people on this list, I also love this thread!  It interests me in many different ways.  As someone with teaching Women Studies background and IT, I am engage in community locally  and globally with UN on projects such as “ Take back the Tech Campaign” etc.

I will be attending Educause in Anaheim.  Any meeting for ITWOMEN ?  My apology in advance if it is being shared.  Been really busy this week.

Best,

 

Elahe Amani

Director,  Student Technology Services

California State University, Fullerton

Langsdorf Hall 700I

Website:      http://www.fullerton.edu/sa/technologyservices/

Telephone: (657) 278-4892

Fax:                (657) 626-1231

Twitter:        SATechnology

800 N. State College Blvd.

Fullerton, CA 92831

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Norris, Helen
Sent: Friday, October 11, 2013 8:28 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Hello all

 

What a great thread!  It’s also really great to get links to so many articles.

 

A lot of the comments refer to lack of guidance early in career, or lack of focus on STEM fields in middle and high school.  That all resonates with me and I completely agree that the focus is changing – there are many efforts to reach out to girls to engage them in STEM fields, far more that when I was young!  It is critical that we increase the pipeline of girls coming into technical fields, not only because it’s the right thing to do, but because we will continue to have demand for these skills that we simply can’t meet, especially if the field feels closed off to half of the population.  I’d like to encourage all of us to participate in these outreach efforts to girls and young women.  There was an interesting thread a few months ago on this listserv started by someone (my apologies; I can’t remember her name) who was going to speak at a local high school.  Her comments inspired me to get involved in outreach to our local schools; I encourage everyone else to do the same thing to inspire the next generation of women in IT!

 

Helen

 

Helen Norris

Associate Chief Information Officer

Information Resources & Technology

California State University, Sacramento

Sacramento, CA  95819

helen.norris@csus.edu

(916) 278-7706

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Pam Arroway
Sent: Friday, October 11, 2013 7:40 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Rae and others—

 

ECAR studies don’t typically garner enough data to do much geographic analysis.  We can usually only afford to slice the data in very large regions that don’t show any effect, probably because they’re too broad. In some studies, we’ve also looked at the location of the institution (urban, suburban or rural) and haven’t found much.

 

Earlier in this thread, someone was asking about salaries and we do have salary data in our upcoming workforce report and presentation.  As my colleague already mentioned, please consider attending Jackie Bichsel’s talk on this: “What You Need to Know About Today’s IT Workforce” (Thursday, October 17, 2013 at 1:30 PM PDT, room 304C/D: http://www.educause.edu/annual-conference/2013/what-you-need-know-about-todays-it-workforce).

 

ECAR has also recently published related research. As was mentioned in this thread, some of this is covered by Wayne Brown’s work with CHECS. The CIO and Tech Leader CHECS reports are available to ECAR subscribers.  Though the link given previously is more on point with this discussion.

 

In addition, we published a report by Beth Clark: “Gender Diversity Among Higher Education CIOs”. This report was based on her doctoral research and while it focuses on CIOs, I think many of the findings relate to tech leaders more generally. This report was just published in September, so won’t be publicly available for a few months.  However, we published a research bulletin from her on this topic last year, that is freely available now.

 

This is obviously a shameless plug for ECAR work.  I hope you will seriously consider responding to any survey requests you get from us!  We can’t do the research without your input!  We also welcome your input on the research we are doing (and not doing).

 

Thanks!

Pam

 

Pam Arroway Senior Statistician

EDUCAUSE
Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good
direct: 303.544.5678 | main: 303.449.4430 | educause.edu

 

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Raechelle Clemmons
Sent: Friday, October 11, 2013 7:23 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

I'm enjoying reading the comments on this thread. I came out of high-tech startups before I got into higher ed, and was always the only woman around the leadership table and was one of few women in the company, especially in the early days of each startup. And, I was on the marketing side, NOT technical (although I did do product marketing). When I moved into HE leadership, in my first institution there were 2 of us who were female directors of (I think) 11 total, but we were in the "fluffier" fields -- user support for one and relationship/project management for the other. 

 

Today I have 8 of 21 women on my team, including me as the CIO. The interesting part is that we've made 3 programmer hires recently, and ALL 3 have been women. It's shocked me, to tell you the truth. I'm happy to have that, but I've never seen that many female candidates for programming positions before.

 

So it makes me wonder, is some of this geography-based? Are there regions where you might see higher concentrations of women in particular fields, relative to other regions?

 

Rae

 

Hi Elahe,

Thanks for the reminder! The Women in IT Constituent Group will be meeting on site at EDUCAUSE on Wednesday, October 16th from 11:40am -12:30pm in Meeting Room 210A/B. 

The Women in IT CG will also be hosting a Learning Theatre Group session on Wednesday, October 16th from 2:30pm-3:20pm in Exhibit Hall C called Improv: Improve! 

Come join us!! 

Beth
---
Beth Schaefer, Director of Client Services
EDUCAUSE Women in IT CG Co-Lead
University Information Technology Services
University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
Office: Sabin Hall 397
Phone: 414 229-4072 Fax: 414 229-4777
Cell: 414 430-7521
Email: beths@uwm.edu

From: "Elahe Amani" <eamani@EXCHANGE.FULLERTON.EDU>
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2013 7:11:46 PM
Subject: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

Dear all,

As said by other people on this list, I also love this thread!  It interests me in many different ways.  As someone with teaching Women Studies background and IT, I am engage in community locally  and globally with UN on projects such as “ Take back the Tech Campaign” etc.

I will be attending Educause in Anaheim.  Any meeting for ITWOMEN ?  My apology in advance if it is being shared.  Been really busy this week.

Best,

 

Elahe Amani

Director,  Student Technology Services

California State University, Fullerton

Langsdorf Hall 700I

Website:      http://www.fullerton.edu/sa/technologyservices/

Telephone: (657) 278-4892

Fax:                (657) 626-1231

Twitter:        SATechnology

800 N. State College Blvd.

Fullerton, CA 92831

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Norris, Helen
Sent: Friday, October 11, 2013 8:28 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Hello all

 

What a great thread!  It’s also really great to get links to so many articles.

 

A lot of the comments refer to lack of guidance early in career, or lack of focus on STEM fields in middle and high school.  That all resonates with me and I completely agree that the focus is changing – there are many efforts to reach out to girls to engage them in STEM fields, far more that when I was young!  It is critical that we increase the pipeline of girls coming into technical fields, not only because it’s the right thing to do, but because we will continue to have demand for these skills that we simply can’t meet, especially if the field feels closed off to half of the population.  I’d like to encourage all of us to participate in these outreach efforts to girls and young women.  There was an interesting thread a few months ago on this listserv started by someone (my apologies; I can’t remember her name) who was going to speak at a local high school.  Her comments inspired me to get involved in outreach to our local schools; I encourage everyone else to do the same thing to inspire the next generation of women in IT!

 

Helen

 

Helen Norris

Associate Chief Information Officer

Information Resources & Technology

California State University, Sacramento

Sacramento, CA  95819

helen.norris@csus.edu

(916) 278-7706

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Pam Arroway
Sent: Friday, October 11, 2013 7:40 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

Rae and others—

 

ECAR studies don’t typically garner enough data to do much geographic analysis.  We can usually only afford to slice the data in very large regions that don’t show any effect, probably because they’re too broad. In some studies, we’ve also looked at the location of the institution (urban, suburban or rural) and haven’t found much.

 

Earlier in this thread, someone was asking about salaries and we do have salary data in our upcoming workforce report and presentation.  As my colleague already mentioned, please consider attending Jackie Bichsel’s talk on this: “What You Need to Know About Today’s IT Workforce” (Thursday, October 17, 2013 at 1:30 PM PDT, room 304C/D: http://www.educause.edu/annual-conference/2013/what-you-need-know-about-todays-it-workforce).

 

ECAR has also recently published related research. As was mentioned in this thread, some of this is covered by Wayne Brown’s work with CHECS. The CIO and Tech Leader CHECS reports are available to ECAR subscribers.  Though the link given previously is more on point with this discussion.

 

In addition, we published a report by Beth Clark: “Gender Diversity Among Higher Education CIOs”. This report was based on her doctoral research and while it focuses on CIOs, I think many of the findings relate to tech leaders more generally. This report was just published in September, so won’t be publicly available for a few months.  However, we published a research bulletin from her on this topic last year, that is freely available now.

 

This is obviously a shameless plug for ECAR work.  I hope you will seriously consider responding to any survey requests you get from us!  We can’t do the research without your input!  We also welcome your input on the research we are doing (and not doing).

 

Thanks!

Pam

 

Pam Arroway Senior Statistician

EDUCAUSE
Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good
direct: 303.544.5678 | main: 303.449.4430 | educause.edu

 

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Raechelle Clemmons
Sent: Friday, October 11, 2013 7:23 AM
To: ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITWOMEN] IHE Article regarding Women in EdTech Leadership positions

 

I'm enjoying reading the comments on this thread. I came out of high-tech startups before I got into higher ed, and was always the only woman around the leadership table and was one of few women in the company, especially in the early days of each startup. And, I was on the marketing side, NOT technical (although I did do product marketing). When I moved into HE leadership, in my first institution there were 2 of us who were female directors of (I think) 11 total, but we were in the "fluffier" fields -- user support for one and relationship/project management for the other. 

 

Today I have 8 of 21 women on my team, including me as the CIO. The interesting part is that we've made 3 programmer hires recently, and ALL 3 have been women. It's shocked me, to tell you the truth. I'm happy to have that, but I've never seen that many female candidates for programming positions before.

 

So it makes me wonder, is some of this geography-based? Are there regions where you might see higher concentrations of women in particular fields, relative to other regions?

 

Rae

 

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