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Hello,

 

I don’t know if this is the appropriate group to post my message but I’ll go ahead and ask.

 

I am a young woman in IT (in Wireless Networking) and in a couple of weeks I should give a presentation to a group of female students (11-13 years old) in order to convince them to join an IT career path.

The presentation is one hour long.

How can I motivate them and make this presentation interesting?

Considering their age, I should be less technical as possible, in order not to lose their attention.

I thought about doing  some experiments with a wireless network setup. I don’t know if this would be a right approach.

 

What is your advice? Have you had similar experiences?

 

Thank you in advance for sharing your opinions and tips on this subject.

 

Best regards,

 

Alexandra

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Hi, Alexandra--

This is the perfect forum for the message!

I can recommend the NCWIT (National Center for Women & IT) resources that are available on their website at http://www.ncwit.org.

Head to the resources section, and choose the K-12 option. You can refine your search in any way you want. To get right to a "road show in a box" resource (which sounds perfect for your needs), either search directly for it, or click "recruitment" and "programs in a box" as your search terms.

That particular resource includes activities you can do with K-12 students to expose them to the IT/computing field, and gives hints about classroom management and how to structure your presentation. There are powerpoint slides that you can adapt for elementary school children, or middle school.

Can you check back in to say how your presentation went? You'll probably inspire the rest of us!

Best,

Deb


Deborah Keyek-Franssen, Ph.D.
Director, Academic Technology
Co-Director, Colorado Coalition for Gender & IT
Director, Colorado Learning and Teaching with Technology Conference (COLTT)
313 UCB
Boulder, CO  80309-0313
303-492-2403
deblkf@colorado.edu

From: Alexandra Frincu <alexandra.frincu@UNIL.CH>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE ITWomen Constituent Group Listserv <ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Thursday, September 13, 2012 7:46 AM
To: "ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITWOMEN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [ITWOMEN] motivate female students for an IT career

Hello,

 

I don’t know if this is the appropriate group to post my message but I’ll go ahead and ask.

 

I am a young woman in IT (in Wireless Networking) and in a couple of weeks I should give a presentation to a group of female students (11-13 years old) in order to convince them to join an IT career path.

The presentation is one hour long.

How can I motivate them and make this presentation interesting?

Considering their age, I should be less technical as possible, in order not to lose their attention.

I thought about doing  some experiments with a wireless network setup. I don’t know if this would be a right approach.

 

What is your advice? Have you had similar experiences?

 

Thank you in advance for sharing your opinions and tips on this subject.

 

Best regards,

 

Alexandra

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Good morning

 

I have a 13 year old daughter and an 18 year old daughter. I can give you some suggestions on what interests girls this age and possible ways to relate. They are a generation of community and sharing.

 

Instagram – these girls love sharing pictures.

Facebook – they are losing interest in this; however there are a lot of good careers associated with it.

Twitter – my 18 year olds age group is obsessed with it.

Smart Phones/iPods/iDevices – I got the line “everyone has one” from my 13 year old. They are becoming more prevalent at this age group. They like Apple products.

Tablets – Where’s My Water app, Angry Birds, YouTube, Netflix, Hulu, reading apps (Kindle, iBooks) – anything they can get instant/on-demand access to shows, videos

 

And the glue – Networking. They have no clue how it works. For our generation, it would be like electricity. It is there and it works.

 

Discuss how the pieces work and career possibilities for each. Relate to them on how they can help others through technology.

 

Point them to resources. I’ve been following http://www.girlstart.org/ on Twitter.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Tina

 

Tina Meier

Director, Server Administration

Information Technology

Oklahoma State University System

003 Math Sciences

Stillwater, OK  74074

tina.meier@okstate.edu

405-744-9375

Twitter – tinadmeier

LinkedIn = Tina Meier

 

 

Alexandra,

You can also mention a program we have at DePauw University, the Information Technology Associates Program, to help them think about pre-career planning. ITAP is a four-year on-campus internship program that enables students of any major to learn about various areas of technology while working on campus in a professional environment. Their experience learning about technology helps them supplement their academic degree, develop liberal arts skills, and enhance their post-graduate applications. You can find more information at http://www.depauw.edu/it/itap. This may help them think about the wide range of possibilities an IT career has to offer.

It just so happens all three administrators for the program are women!

Donnie



Alexandra,

I've recently been reading Made to Stick http://www.heathbrothers.com/madetostick/ by Chip and Dan Heath and it is influencing everything I think about these days.  So forewarned.  They would say something like the following, using their "Succes" measure.  (Simplicity, unexpected, concrete, credible, emotional, story)

1. Make it simple.
2. Unexpected.  If you can set up some kind of puzzle at the beginning that catches their interest and lead them to discover the answer.
3. Concrete.  not "career opportunities" but "this is a job that a real person is doing"

Credible, emotional and story are all fairly self explanatory, and they put the most emphasis on "story" as being the way to get ideas to stick well. They give some great examples of people telling stories in passing during a presentation and the story being the one thing that the audience remembers.

Good luck.  Sounds like a great program that you are participating in.

Joseph
Joseph Vaughan CIO/Vice-President for Computing and Information Services Harvey Mudd College vaughan@hmc.edu 909 621 8613 free/busy info at http://bit.ly/vaughanfreebusy On 09/13/2012 06:46 AM, Alexandra Frincu wrote:

Hello,

 

I don’t know if this is the appropriate group to post my message but I’ll go ahead and ask.

 

I am a young woman in IT (in Wireless Networking) and in a couple of weeks I should give a presentation to a group of female students (11-13 years old) in order to convince them to join an IT career path.

The presentation is one hour long.

How can I motivate them and make this presentation interesting?

Considering their age, I should be less technical as possible, in order not to lose their attention.

I thought about doing  some experiments with a wireless network setup. I don’t know if this would be a right approach.

 

What is your advice? Have you had similar experiences?

 

Thank you in advance for sharing your opinions and tips on this subject.

 

Best regards,

 

Alexandra

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from rseitz@verizon.net

Hi Alexandra, 
Check out the NCWIT website for lots of great activities for the girls to DO and to do together. Girls this age are very motivated to show how capable they, and it's all about motivation, engagement and collaboration, right?! Take a look at the LEGO MIND-STORMS activity. Good luck and have FUN!
Robin 

Robin Berk Seitz, PhD
Former Chair, Girls in Technology
Washington DC-metro area WIT
Specialist Master
Deloitte Consulting LLP

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