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We are changing from Cisco Clean Access to Impulses Safe Connect for NAC for our student network. Under CCA we did not allow game systems on our network due to the extra work to let them through Clean Access and because of bandwidth usage concerns. With Safe Connect they can be allowed on our network much easier but we still have bandwidth usage concerns.

 

We currently have a 100mb Internet pipe which we are going to increase to 120mb this summer.

 

Do you folks allow gaming systems on your campus network and what impact have you seen on bandwidth usage?

 

Thanks for any input you can provide.

 

Paul Crittenden

Computer System Manager

Simpson College

Indianola, IA

direct: 515-961-1680

www.simpson.edu

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

We allow them but they have the lowest priority through the packet shaper. They consume the most bandwidth on the wireless network than other devices.

 

 

Tim Cappalli, ACMP CCNA | (802) 626-6456

Office of Information Technology (OIT) | Lyndon

» cappalli@lyndonstate.edu | oit.lyndonstate.edu

 

 

Hi, Paul.  We have been using SafeConnect for a few years now (former CCA customer too), and we do allow gaming consoles.  The biggest headache we have had is with Xboxes.  Getting more than a few at a time to successfully connect to Xbox Live through a NAT connection is tough.  All of our traffic goes through a NetEqualizer, so if a console was using an enormous amount of bandwidth, it would get scaled back.

 

Regards,

Charlie

 

Charlie Prothero

Chief Information Officer

 

Keystone College

Information Technology Building

One College Green

P.O. Box 50 • La Plume, PA 18440-0200

570-945-8015

 

 

We have tested creating a SSID for gaming consoles and used the Impulse product to ensure that only gaming consoles connect to this SSID.  This has worked in testing however we have not rolled this out across the campus.

 

Bruce Entwistle

Network Manager

University of Redlands

 

 

Message from dwallac3@kent.edu

We allow gaming consoles on both wired or wireless network in our residence halls.  We rate limit per IP and restrict to off campus resources only.  We use per IP rate limiting to manage the bandwidth Gaming consoles can consume.  

 

We have Cisco NAC / Clean Access and use wildcard mac addresses for the Xbox consoles (we don’t see too many Playstations). Six out of my top ten applications are streaming media (Youtube, Netflix, Pandora, et cetera), and I have never seen actual video games in that top ten list, but the consoles can stream Netflix.

 

My only gripe with the game consoles has been manually opening ports to individual devices on the student network. Similar to Bruce, we have an entire SSID built out to fix the administration overhead, but ran into a small bug with the DHCP server improperly NAKing clients so the project was put on hold until a fix is in place.

 

Best,

Dave M

 

David Marion

Bridgewater State University

 

 

We have allowed gaming consoles on our network for a number of years. We allow students to connect to off campus games/services but we do not allow them to host due to firewall restrictions. This has worked out well so far. I don't recall us opening any ports for them to connect from on campus to off.

As far as bandwidth consumption it has been relatively low. We have around 6500 students in the reshalls, it looks like around 10 Mbps peak total for all of them. The issue is typically when latency/jitter occurs, so we have to prioritize the gaming services in our Packetlogic.

We allow game consoles on our wired and wireless network using our Bradford Campus Manager.  Game Consoles games are not appearing in our top 20 of top bandwidth utilization as seen by our Procera PacketLogic.  Where we see the traffic is Netflix and Youtube access through Game Consoles and BluRay players. 

 

T.R. Knight

Director of Technology Services/CISO

Taylor University
236 W. Reade Avenue
Upland, IN  46989
Office:  765-998-4902

Fax:  765-998-4640
tr.knight@taylor.edu

 

 

 

 

For the month of April, Gaming consumed about 0.2% of our overall bandwidth. You should be fine. It's streaming media that will get you.
We have always allowed game consoles on our resnet. Gaming doesn't take up a significant amount of our bandwidth for us. I think we'd have a rebellion if we banned them. There is some admin overhead but it's not terrible.

We treat them the same as other hosts. Cap the amount of Mbps they can use and we do not open ports from the Internet for anyone. They sometimes complain about this but its not negotiable.

On 5/21/2012 10:44 AM, Paul Crittenden wrote:

We are changing from Cisco Clean Access to Impulses Safe Connect for NAC for our student network. Under CCA we did not allow game systems on our network due to the extra work to let them through Clean Access and because of bandwidth usage concerns. With Safe Connect they can be allowed on our network much easier but we still have bandwidth usage concerns.

 

We currently have a 100mb Internet pipe which we are going to increase to 120mb this summer.

 

Do you folks allow gaming systems on your campus network and what impact have you seen on bandwidth usage?

 

Thanks for any input you can provide.

 

Paul Crittenden

Computer System Manager

Simpson College

Indianola, IA

direct: 515-961-1680

www.simpson.edu

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


-- Vlade Ristevski Network Manager IT Services Ramapo College (201)-684-6854 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Gaming consoles need a low latency, not large amounts of bandwidth. As the port usage per game is all over the place per-ip throttling should take care of any momentary bursting issues.

 


~Patrick

 

We don't have any restrictions on gaming consoles, though I do recommend that the student uses a wired connection for gaming consoles to improve air time fairness on the wireless network. We don't provide any support for them at this time beyond ensuring network connectivity. I've only had a few requests (maybe once a year) to open a specific port, but usually the request is denied as we don't allow users to host game servers on our network. Game traffic itself makes up a very small part of the consumed bandwidth. The majority of the traffic comes from streaming services.

On 5/21/2012 9:44 AM, Paul Crittenden wrote:

We are changing from Cisco Clean Access to Impulses Safe Connect for NAC for our student network. Under CCA we did not allow game systems on our network due to the extra work to let them through Clean Access and because of bandwidth usage concerns. With Safe Connect they can be allowed on our network much easier but we still have bandwidth usage concerns.

 

We currently have a 100mb Internet pipe which we are going to increase to 120mb this summer.

 

Do you folks allow gaming systems on your campus network and what impact have you seen on bandwidth usage?

 

Thanks for any input you can provide.

 

Paul Crittenden

Computer System Manager

Simpson College

Indianola, IA

direct: 515-961-1680

www.simpson.edu

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.



--
Heath Barnhart, CCNA
Network Administrator
Information Technology Services
Washburn University
Topeka, KS
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

I forgot to mention, we do this as well. We always tell them we prefer that they use a wired port.

On 5/22/2012 9:28 AM, Heath Barnhart wrote:
We don't have any restrictions on gaming consoles, though I do recommend that the student uses a wired connection for gaming consoles to improve air time fairness on the wireless network. We don't provide any support for them at this time beyond ensuring network connectivity. I've only had a few requests (maybe once a year) to open a specific port, but usually the request is denied as we don't allow users to host game servers on our network. Game traffic itself makes up a very small part of the consumed bandwidth. The majority of the traffic comes from streaming services.

On 5/21/2012 9:44 AM, Paul Crittenden wrote:

We are changing from Cisco Clean Access to Impulses Safe Connect for NAC for our student network. Under CCA we did not allow game systems on our network due to the extra work to let them through Clean Access and because of bandwidth usage concerns. With Safe Connect they can be allowed on our network much easier but we still have bandwidth usage concerns.

 

We currently have a 100mb Internet pipe which we are going to increase to 120mb this summer.

 

Do you folks allow gaming systems on your campus network and what impact have you seen on bandwidth usage?

 

Thanks for any input you can provide.

 

Paul Crittenden

Computer System Manager

Simpson College

Indianola, IA

direct: 515-961-1680

www.simpson.edu

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.



--
Heath Barnhart, CCNA
Network Administrator
Information Technology Services
Washburn University
Topeka, KS
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


-- Vlade Ristevski Network Manager IT Services Ramapo College (201)-684-6854 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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