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Hello list members,

 

We recently upgraded our Internet bandwidth to 500 Mbps and were hard pressed to test it to see if the Internet Service Provider actually provided us with that amount of bandwidth.  The traditional web-based test sites (ie. speedtest.net) typically top out at 100Mbps.

 

Does anyone have a different test available or a more reliable way to test your bandwidth?  We would like to make sure we actually are getting that amount without having to wait for our usage graphs to show us.

 

Thanks,

Brad

 

 

Bradley A. Kauffman

Systems Administrator

IT Services

Albright College

1355 Union St.

Reading, PA 19604

Ph: 610-921-7239

Fx: 610-921-7530

 

P Please consider the environment before printing this email

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Message from dwallac3@kent.edu

Use Iperf

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 3, 2012, at 13:55, "Kauffman, Bradley A." <bkauffman@ALB.EDU> wrote:

Hello list members,

 

We recently upgraded our Internet bandwidth to 500 Mbps and were hard pressed to test it to see if the Internet Service Provider actually provided us with that amount of bandwidth.  The traditional web-based test sites (ie. speedtest.net) typically top out at 100Mbps.

 

Does anyone have a different test available or a more reliable way to test your bandwidth?  We would like to make sure we actually are getting that amount without having to wait for our usage graphs to show us.

 

Thanks,

Brad

 

 

Bradley A. Kauffman

Systems Administrator

IT Services

Albright College

1355 Union St.

Reading, PA 19604

Ph: 610-921-7239

Fx: 610-921-7530

 

P Please consider the environment before printing this email

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Iperf to where?  Does anyone operate a publicly accessible Iperf server for testing?  I knew of several years ago, but they’ve been dismantled.

 

Regards,

 

Travis Foschini

 

From: WALLACE, DAVID [mailto:dwallac3@KENT.EDU]
Sent: Monday, September 03, 2012 1:19 PM
Subject: Re: bandwidth speed test

 

Use Iperf

Sent from my iPhone


On Sep 3, 2012, at 13:55, "Kauffman, Bradley A." <bkauffman@ALB.EDU> wrote:

Hello list members,

 

We recently upgraded our Internet bandwidth to 500 Mbps and were hard pressed to test it to see if the Internet Service Provider actually provided us with that amount of bandwidth.  The traditional web-based test sites (ie. speedtest.net) typically top out at 100Mbps.

 

Does anyone have a different test available or a more reliable way to test your bandwidth?  We would like to make sure we actually are getting that amount without having to wait for our usage graphs to show us.

 

Thanks,

Brad

 

 

Bradley A. Kauffman

Systems Administrator

IT Services

Albright College

1355 Union St.

Reading, PA 19604

Ph: 610-921-7239

Fx: 610-921-7530

 

P Please consider the environment before printing this email

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

You can try our speedtest mini site. Hosted on a VM, but I've found it more capable than most.  IPv6-supported.

http://speedtest.fhsu.edu


Derek Johnson | Data Communications Coordinator
FORT HAYS STATE UNIVERSITY
415 Lyman Dr. TH 101, Hays, KS 67601
(785) 628 - 5688 | djohnson@fhsu.edu





From:        "Kauffman, Bradley A." <bkauffman@ALB.EDU>
To:        NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU,
Date:        09/03/2012 12:56 PM
Subject:        [NETMAN] bandwidth speed test
Sent by:        The EDUCAUSE Network Management Constituent Group Listserv <NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>



Hello list members,
 
We recently upgraded our Internet bandwidth to 500 Mbps and were hard pressed to test it to see if the Internet Service Provider actually provided us with that amount of bandwidth.  The traditional web-based test sites (ie. speedtest.net) typically top out at 100Mbps.
 
Does anyone have a different test available or a more reliable way to test your bandwidth?  We would like to make sure we actually are getting that amount without having to wait for our usage graphs to show us.
 
Thanks,
Brad
 
 
Bradley A. Kauffman
Systems Administrator
IT Services
Albright College
1355 Union St.
Reading, PA 19604
Ph: 610-921-7239
Fx: 610-921-7530
 
P Please consider the environment before printing this email
 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

HI Brad,

 

I’ve also used the jperf variant for this type of testing:

http://iperf.sourceforge.net/

 

CB

 

 

Here's a site that may be useful, although my desktop is limited to 100Mbps so I can't verify their top end capabilities:

http://www.measurementlab.net/run-ndt

Randy

On 9/4/2012 11:31 AM, Chad Burnham wrote:

HI Brad,

 

I’ve also used the jperf variant for this type of testing:

http://iperf.sourceforge.net/

 

CB

 

 

Message from aschroeder@gw.hamline.edu

the only downfall with another institution may be that the traffic route may be unpredictable. ie, it may use internet2, or may try to use a different provider, if applicable. you could try a test with the provider directly, but that only proves your connection to them, not necessarily to the internet in general. also, the "internet" is a very open term, as depending on peering agreements, connecting to one site over that ISP may work a lot better than connecting to another. we are looking a low-cost/high bandwith provider, but only as a secondary provider to dilute our costs, and provide redundancy. we will continue our agreement with a tier 1 provider, and use BGP to find the best route. it doesn't tap into the full ability of that larger circuit (1GB in our case), but it takes some usage off our tier1 circuit. anthony. anthony schroeder dir of infrastructure services hamline university aschroeder@hamline.edu >>> "Randy D. Anderson" 9/4/2012 10:38 AM >>> Here's a site that may be useful, although my desktop is limited to 100Mbps so I can't verify their top end capabilities: http://www.measurementlab.net/run-ndt Randy On 9/4/2012 11:31 AM, Chad Burnham wrote: > > HI Brad, > > I've also used the jperf variant for this type of testing: > > http://iperf.sourceforge.net/ > > CB > > *
It looks like our ISP, Utah Education Network (UEN) provides a public server for speed testing.  We are on their backbone, and I am getting ~200 Mbps from my desktop.
 
(Search for this server:)
Salt Lake City, UT
Hosted by Utah Education Network
 
I agree that iperf will be the best test for maximum throughput.  You just need to find some nice people on this list who will let you test to their iperf server! 
 
Cheers,
 
Tristan
 
--
Tristan Rhodes
Network Engineer
Weber State University
(801) 626-8549


>>> On 9/4/2012 at 9:31 AM, in message <F8B9E55D08935149BDAE96765EB271686EABB121E6@EXCH.du.edu>, Chad Burnham <cburnham@DU.EDU> wrote:

HI Brad,

 

I’ve also used the jperf variant for this type of testing:

http://iperf.sourceforge.net/

 

CB

 

 

Message from fkass@mtholyoke.edu

I too have found speedtest and most of the other ones to be pretty bad for speeds greater then 30mbit.  This NDT one seems much better although maybe they could make their output nicer for high speed connections, it said my speed was 2.7E+2 Mb/s. :)

Brad,

Did you happen to ask your ISP if they provide a speed test server for customer use?

We have only had two different ISP's in the time that I have worked for Binghamton, but both provided a speed test server for our use. Both ran software from Ookla. We have also done an iperf test to an ISP provided server in the past.

But keep in mind that these tests only show your max speed into the provider's network, whether they are providing you with the appropriate upstream bandwidth is a different story.

Good idea. One of our providers, Time Warner Telecommunications, provides a speed test on their network. This is the only chance you have of testing the bandwidth of your connection with them. It still may be hard to generate enough traffic to fill up the pipe though, depending upon how big it is and the capabilities and load of the endpoints of either end of the test. It is always good to verify you are getting what you paid for, but I can say that we have never had problems with providers not providing the bandwidth contracted. It would be illegal for them not to. As to upstream, you should ask to see their network backbone map as well as info about upstream providers, backbone speeds and utilization. They also do have some incentive to give you all the bandwidth you can handle because then you have a reason to buy more.

 

Pete Morrissey

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Network Management Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Joe Roth
Sent: Tuesday, September 04, 2012 3:00 PM
To: NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [NETMAN] bandwidth speed test

 

Brad,

 

Did you happen to ask your ISP if they provide a speed test server for customer use?

 

We have only had two different ISP's in the time that I have worked for Binghamton, but both provided a speed test server for our use. Both ran software from Ookla. We have also done an iperf test to an ISP provided server in the past.

 

But keep in mind that these tests only show your max speed into the provider's network, whether they are providing you with the appropriate upstream bandwidth is a different story.

Theoretically any of the links from this site should work, but I’ve found it can take a while to get a test to start:

 

http://www.internet2.edu/performance/ndt/ndt-server-list.html

 

I think there are some universities that also run NDT servers, but I can’t currently remember which ones.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gavin Pyle | Network Engineer | Green River Community College

gpyle@greenriver.edu

 

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