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Hi,

 

We are a Cisco shop and must stay that….

 

We have some limited funds to upgrade some of our edge network switches in our student residence halls.  We currently have Cisco 2950’s fed by 1G links.  Our main campus uses, and is suggesting, Cisco 3750X switches.  Because of cost and a somewhat unclear understanding of the need for these, we are looking more towards the Cisco 2960S as a lead switch into the closet.  We are looking to convert from 1G to 10G into the stack.

 

Any input would be appreciated.

 

Bill

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

I happily use that switch.  I don't do any L3 at the edge, it's fine for us.

-Rick

On 2/7/2012 11:03 AM, Kline, Bill wrote:

Hi,

 

We are a Cisco shop and must stay that….

 

We have some limited funds to upgrade some of our edge network switches in our student residence halls.  We currently have Cisco 2950’s fed by 1G links.  Our main campus uses, and is suggesting, Cisco 3750X switches.  Because of cost and a somewhat unclear understanding of the need for these, we are looking more towards the Cisco 2960S as a lead switch into the closet.  We are looking to convert from 1G to 10G into the stack.

 

Any input would be appreciated.

 

Bill

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


-- Rick Coloccia, Jr. Network Manager State University of NY College at Geneseo 1 College Circle, 119 South Hall Geneseo, NY 14454 V: 585-245-5577 F: 585-245-5579 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

If you are looking for L2 functionality (it can do QoS, multicast, rate limiting and other more advanced stuff as well) on the edge and don’t think you will ever oversubscribe the 10Gb stacking of the 2960S, which most will not, then they are a very good fit.  I’d go with the S version as well just for the PoE+.  I think the 3750Xs are great switches but are overkill in many places.

 

Fyi,

Brian

 

The biggest difference is the ability to use the layer 3 software in the 3750Xs. I also believe that the stacking module comes with the 3750Xs and it's an additional cost for the 2960S. We don't stack any of our 2960Ses because it costs almost as much as the switch. On Tue, 7 Feb 2012, Kline, Bill wrote: > Hi, > > We are a Cisco shop and must stay that.... > > We have some limited funds to upgrade some of our edge network switches in our student residence halls. We currently have Cisco 2950's fed by 1G links. Our main campus uses, and is suggesting, Cisco 3750X switches. Because of cost and a somewhat unclear understanding of the need for these, we are looking more towards the Cisco 2960S as a lead switch into the closet. We are looking to convert from 1G to 10G into the stack. > > Any input would be appreciated. > > Bill > > > ********** > Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. > > > -- Greg T. Grimes Senior Network Analyst Information Technology Services Mississippi State University greg.grimes@msstate.edu ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
We have traditionally used 2960s for access, 3750s for distribution, and 6500s for our core.  However, we are migrating to a model of 4500s for access and distribution.  Take a look at the 4500, and you will see it has several advantages.  The supervisors all have some 10-gig capability for uplinks, hitless ISSU upgrades (requires redundant supervisors), and they have bundle pricing that makes them affordable.  They have a lifetime limited warranty, and you can easily add more 10-gig ports when they are needed.
 
Here is a good edge bundle if you need at least 96 ports with a lot of room to grow.
 
Cheers!
 
Tristan
 
--
Tristan Rhodes
Network Engineer
Weber State University
(801) 626-8549


>>> On 2/7/2012 at 9:03 AM, in message <43F8AD2DF0B77547A6F5E360AE51E3ED0813C92B58@PITT-EXCH-10.univ.pitt.edu>, "Kline, Bill" <kline@PITT.EDU> wrote:

Hi,

 

We are a Cisco shop and must stay that….

 

We have some limited funds to upgrade some of our edge network switches in our student residence halls.  We currently have Cisco 2950’s fed by 1G links.  Our main campus uses, and is suggesting, Cisco 3750X switches.  Because of cost and a somewhat unclear understanding of the need for these, we are looking more towards the Cisco 2960S as a lead switch into the closet.  We are looking to convert from 1G to 10G into the stack.

 

Any input would be appreciated.

 

Bill

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Be cautious of the 4506E chassis for access – the performance, capacity and the bundle price is great but the per-port HVAC requirements are double a comparable 3560. You can spend more money putting in additional cooling in a small closet than you’ll save on bundle pricing. -Scott Scott Allen Deputy Director Network and Computing Systems Georgetown University Information Services 3300 Whitehaven Street, NW Suite 2018 Washington, DC 20007 scott@georgetown.edu 202-687-5643 - Office 202-309-5739 - Cell
Along the same lines of inquiry, you get five degrees Celsius higher operating temp with a 2960S; 40 for the 4500 vs. 45 for the 2960. This is something I always look at to help gauge switch durability and the fact we have some pretty hot closets. -Brian
I was not aware of this issue.  Are you comparing a 3560 with gigabit and POE+ (25.5 watts per port)?  Is there a good way to determine this energy usage?  
 
I have a 4507R+E switch with 2 x SUP 7L-E supervisors and 3 x 48 = 144 port POE+ line cards, and it is using 969 watts, which is around 6.7 watts per port.  (Note:  I am not using any of the ports yet, so no POE.  This system would be more efficient if I had 5 x 48 port modules to spread the overhead of supervisors and fans).
 
This is a fun related video....
 
Cheers,
 
Tristan
 
--
Tristan Rhodes
Network Engineer
Weber State University
(801) 626-8549


>>> On 2/7/2012 at 9:53 AM, in message <03f901cce5b8$fa8b7b50$efa271f0$@georgetown.edu>, Scott Allen <scott@GEORGETOWN.EDU> wrote:
Be cautious of the 4506E chassis for access – the performance, capacity and the bundle price is great but the per-port HVAC requirements are double a comparable 3560.  You can spend more money putting in additional cooling in a small closet than you’ll save on bundle pricing.
-Scott

Scott Allen
Deputy Director Network and Computing Systems
Georgetown University Information Services
3300 Whitehaven Street, NW Suite 2018
Washington, DC 20007
scott@georgetown.edu
202-687-5643 - Office
202-309-5739 - Cell




Yes 3560E vs. 4506-E.  Using PoE itself isn’t bad – the device drawing power (and converting it to heat) is typically outside the closet (e.g. WAP, VoIP)– the issue is that the chassis with all its cards run hotter.  The spec sheets provide detail.   We built a spreadsheet, your mileage may vary.

-Scott

Type

Product

Output Power
Used (W)

Input Power
Required (W)

Heat Dissipation
(BTU/Hr)

3560 - 48 port

WS-C3560E-48PD750W

80.00

80.00

273.20

3560 - 24 port

WS-C3560E-24PD

60.00

60.00

204.90

Class 2 PoE Device

Class 2

7.00

7.00

5.97

Class 3 PoE Device

Class 3

15.40

15.40

13.15

 

 

 

 

 

4506E Chassis

WS-C4506-E

120.00

141.18

546.40

Supervisor

WS-X45-SUP6L-E

210.00

247.06

956.20

PoE Card

WS-X4648-RJ45V+E

92.04

108.28

419.09

100Base FX - MTRJ

WS-X4148-FX-MT 

120.00

141.18

546.40

Class 2 PoE Device

Class 2

7.00

8.24

11.91

Class 3 PoE Device

Class 3

15.40

18.12

26.20

 

 

 

 

 

6509E Chassis

WS-C6509-E-FAN 

150.36

176.89

604.1

24-port SFP Card

WS-X6724-SFP

162.96

191.72

654.72

Gig PoE Card

WS-X6148A-GE-45AF

112.56

132.42

452.23

10G Supervisor

VS-S720-10G-3C

338.1

397.76

1358.37

Class 2 PoE Device

Class 2

7.00

8.24

7.69

Class 3 PoE Device

Class 3

15.40

18.12

16.93

Eaton 1500VA

 

 

 

179.6

Eaton 3000VA

 

 

 

588

 

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