Main Nav

All, We’re getting to the point of needing to replace our FDDI-grade multi-mode with single-mode all over campus. We operate the classis three tier model, with 6 main campus distributions (and six geological star topologies).

 

We’ve heard of a campus installing a ring throughout campus with every building landing in the data center. Still, most seem to be sticking with a star, or set-of-stars topology.

 

We’ve also been looking at TRILL-based topologies, but haven’t determined if that would require a difference fiber topology in our instance.

 

 

Regards,

David Ziemba

 

Network Engineer

ITS, Colorado College

14 E Cache Poudre

Colorado Springs, CO  80903

719.389.6063

david.ziemba@ColoradoCollege.edu

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

We also had a large star-of-stars fddi-grade multimode outside plant to service ~150 buildings. I looked at the cost of pulling a bigger SMF plant to two core datacenters and depreciating it over 20yrs vs buying & maintaining network equipment, ups's, generators, air conditioning, etc as needed at each node site every 5/6 yrs. The consolidation and economy of scale with more linecards in fewer chassis, better UPS (we switched to DC plants with 10yr batteries ) with the new SMF topology paid off after what would have been the second equipment refresh. I would recommend that you do a similar analysis to see if it makes sense for you. Granted, we already had conduit in place to do the pulls, but of course that followed the star of stars topology. So, we just have patch panels at the old star node locations for the SMF, but no active equipment. This also allowed us to "oversubscribe" the amount of SMF that comes back to or two core network datacenters. Of course the next thing we ran into was looking at very high density patch panels for the datacenter. We went with a product line that is targeted at the FTTH carriers and only takes up 3 racks or so (approx 2,000 strands per rack). Dale Thus spake David Ziemba (David.Ziemba@COLORADOCOLLEGE.EDU) on Wed, Dec 11, 2013 at 03:34:39PM +0000: > All, We're getting to the point of needing to replace our FDDI-grade multi-mode with single-mode all over campus. We operate the classis three tier model, with 6 main campus distributions (and six geological star topologies). > > We've heard of a campus installing a ring throughout campus with every building landing in the data center. Still, most seem to be sticking with a star, or set-of-stars topology. > > We've also been looking at TRILL-based topologies, but haven't determined if that would require a difference fiber topology in our instance. > > > Regards, > David Ziemba > > Network Engineer > ITS, Colorado College > 14 E Cache Poudre > Colorado Springs, CO 80903 > 719.389.6063 > david.ziemba@ColoradoCollege.edu > > > ********** > Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. > > ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Regarding Trill, are there any viable solutions for campus networking? Has anyone used it for that application? I am familiar with using it in the datacenter, but not so much on campus backbone.

 

Pete Morrissey

 

When I last talked to folks at Stanford, I believe they were doing a massive campus-wide trill deployment. I can't recall which platform, it might have been n7k w/ f1 cards. Dale Thus spake Peter P Morrissey (ppmorris@SYR.EDU) on Wed, Dec 11, 2013 at 07:42:36PM +0000: > Regarding Trill, are there any viable solutions for campus networking? Has anyone used it for that application? I am familiar with using it in the datacenter, but not so much on campus backbone. > > Pete Morrissey > >

All, We’re getting to the point of needing to replace our FDDI-grade multi-mode with single-mode all over campus. We operate the classis three tier model, with 6 main campus distributions (and six geological star topologies).

 

We’ve heard of a campus installing a ring throughout campus with every building landing in the data center. Still, most seem to be sticking with a star, or set-of-stars topology.

 

We’ve also been looking at TRILL-based topologies, but haven’t determined if that would require a difference fiber topology in our instance.

 

 

Regards,

David Ziemba

 

Network Engineer

ITS, Colorado College

14 E Cache Poudre

Colorado Springs, CO  80903

719.389.6063

david.ziemba@ColoradoCollege.edu

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We also had a large star-of-stars fddi-grade multimode outside plant to service ~150 buildings. I looked at the cost of pulling a bigger SMF plant to two core datacenters and depreciating it over 20yrs vs buying & maintaining network equipment, ups's, generators, air conditioning, etc as needed at each node site every 5/6 yrs. The consolidation and economy of scale with more linecards in fewer chassis, better UPS (we switched to DC plants with 10yr batteries ) with the new SMF topology paid off after what would have been the second equipment refresh. I would recommend that you do a similar analysis to see if it makes sense for you. Granted, we already had conduit in place to do the pulls, but of course that followed the star of stars topology. So, we just have patch panels at the old star node locations for the SMF, but no active equipment. This also allowed us to "oversubscribe" the amount of SMF that comes back to or two core network datacenters. Of course the next thing we ran into was looking at very high density patch panels for the datacenter. We went with a product line that is targeted at the FTTH carriers and only takes up 3 racks or so (approx 2,000 strands per rack). Dale Thus spake David Ziemba (David.Ziemba@COLORADOCOLLEGE.EDU) on Wed, Dec 11, 2013 at 03:34:39PM +0000: > All, We're getting to the point of needing to replace our FDDI-grade multi-mode with single-mode all over campus. We operate the classis three tier model, with 6 main campus distributions (and six geological star topologies). > > We've heard of a campus installing a ring throughout campus with every building landing in the data center. Still, most seem to be sticking with a star, or set-of-stars topology. > > We've also been looking at TRILL-based topologies, but haven't determined if that would require a difference fiber topology in our instance. > > > Regards, > David Ziemba > > Network Engineer > ITS, Colorado College > 14 E Cache Poudre > Colorado Springs, CO 80903 > 719.389.6063 > david.ziemba@ColoradoCollege.edu > > > ********** > Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. > > ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Regarding Trill, are there any viable solutions for campus networking? Has anyone used it for that application? I am familiar with using it in the datacenter, but not so much on campus backbone.

 

Pete Morrissey

 

When I last talked to folks at Stanford, I believe they were doing a massive campus-wide trill deployment. I can't recall which platform, it might have been n7k w/ f1 cards. Dale Thus spake Peter P Morrissey (ppmorris@SYR.EDU) on Wed, Dec 11, 2013 at 07:42:36PM +0000: > Regarding Trill, are there any viable solutions for campus networking? Has anyone used it for that application? I am familiar with using it in the datacenter, but not so much on campus backbone. > > Pete Morrissey > >
Close
Close


Connect: San Antonio
April 22–24
Register Now

Events for all Levels and Interests

Whether you're looking for a conference to attend face-to-face to connect with peers, or for an online event for team professional development, see what's upcoming.

Close

Digital Badges
Member recognition effort
Earn yours >

Career Center


Leadership and Management Programs

EDUCAUSE Institute
Project Management

 

 

Jump Start Your Career Growth

Explore EDUCAUSE professional development opportunities that match your career aspirations and desired level of time investment through our interactive online guide.

 

Close
EDUCAUSE organizes its efforts around three IT Focus Areas

 

 

Join These Programs If Your Focus Is

Close

Get on the Higher Ed IT Map

Employees of EDUCAUSE member institutions and organizations are invited to create individual profiles.
 

 

Close

2015 Strategic Priorities

  • Building the Profession
  • IT as a Game Changer
  • Foundations


Learn More >

Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good™

EDUCAUSE is the foremost community of higher education IT leaders and professionals.