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Out of curiosity, how many institutions out there have a "student funding" component for the campus network?

 

For those of you that do, how many of you attempt to differentiate in some manner "academic use" of the network (for which funding would come centrally out of tuition dollars) vs. "personal use" (for which funding would come from student fees)?     Note that I'm not even thinking about any attempt at a empirically measured ratio; best effort number would be an agreed upon percentage distribution in consultation with student representatives (i.e. what "feels" right).

 

Just curious as to whether or not anyone else has tried this approach.   Thanks!

 

-- Jim Gogan / Univ of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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We look at wireless and network patterns. For example, we can tell that the vast majority of our Internet traffic is student based.  When we were mostly wired in the residences, we were able to see how much traffic went from our Resnet router to our Internet router. We also see that after staff leaves, the Internet usage is still high, and continues to climb through the night.   In addition, based on login ID we can tell that about 90% of the users on our wireless networks are students at any given time. We use metrics like that to estimate how much of a network upgrade should come out of the student fees.  For shared resources we are pretty careful to only charge what makes sense, and in some cases it is fairly obvious.

 

Pete Morrissey

 

We are able to differentiate between residence hall internet traffic and academic/staff/administrative. Residence life pays for the bandwidth which the students use. It about 75% of our total traffic.


On 3/13/2012 3:16 PM, Gogan, James P wrote:

Out of curiosity, how many institutions out there have a "student funding" component for the campus network?

 

For those of you that do, how many of you attempt to differentiate in some manner "academic use" of the network (for which funding would come centrally out of tuition dollars) vs. "personal use" (for which funding would come from student fees)?     Note that I'm not even thinking about any attempt at a empirically measured ratio; best effort number would be an agreed upon percentage distribution in consultation with student representatives (i.e. what "feels" right).

 

Just curious as to whether or not anyone else has tried this approach.   Thanks!

 

-- Jim Gogan / Univ of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

On 3/14/2012 5:19 PM, Vlade Ristevski wrote:
We are able to differentiate between residence hall internet traffic and academic/staff/administrative. Residence life pays for the bandwidth which the students use. It about 75% of our total traffic.

We have traditionally paid bandwidth bills out of campus telecom funding.  However, our "resnet" slice has easily surpassed campus traffic, and the highest peaks are resnet traffic 10PM-2AM.  We are examining having Housing contribute to any expansion.

There is the flat "student technology fee" which covers many of our line items, as we have no significant E&G budget, only the recurring allocations from STF.  Those expenditures are typically applied campus-wide and not to Resnet/Housing directly, but again, that model is changing. 

Campus and Resnet share the same pipes, but we prioritize campus over resnet, particularly during class hours.  If the funding shifts, I would expect to have to make some compensations for their "slice of the pie", further complicating some of the policy decisions.

Jeff
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

yep - we too can distinguish residence hall traffic from the rest of campus, but the issue that I was raising below is whether or not it's "fair" to have students have to pay for network usage that's required as part of their academic program. 

 

For example, just as tuition should cover some level of academic-related costs, should that also provide some of the cost coverage for network usage for academic purposes -- even if that traffic is coming from residence halls?    Should students (even in residence halls) have to pay, say, for that portion of network usage related to Sakai (or Blackboard) traffic?   And you can't assume that all YouTube traffic (again, for example) is "personal" use as many classes have material from YouTube.

 

So not really a residence halls vs. staff/faculty use, but a "personal" vs. "academic" use for student traffic.

Tough question ….

 

-- Jim Gogan / UNC-CH

 

 That's a good point. They maybe using their residence halls connection to do homework and that would contribute to some of their bandwidth use in their dorms. Although our packetshaper tells us alot of it is streaming video, gaming and social networking sites. But at the same time we don't restrict access in the computer labs, so they use that for some personal use as well. The same goes for wireless in the academic buildings. So overall I think it's a fair deal.

I should mention too, that I don't know exactly how much of the cost is pushed onto the student. I just know it comes out of the residence life budget and not the general IT budget.

On 3/14/2012 6:59 PM, Gogan, James P wrote:

yep - we too can distinguish residence hall traffic from the rest of campus, but the issue that I was raising below is whether or not it's "fair" to have students have to pay for network usage that's required as part of their academic program. 

 

For example, just as tuition should cover some level of academic-related costs, should that also provide some of the cost coverage for network usage for academic purposes -- even if that traffic is coming from residence halls?    Should students (even in residence halls) have to pay, say, for that portion of network usage related to Sakai (or Blackboard) traffic?   And you can't assume that all YouTube traffic (again, for example) is "personal" use as many classes have material from YouTube.

 

So not really a residence halls vs. staff/faculty use, but a "personal" vs. "academic" use for student traffic.

Tough question ….

 

-- Jim Gogan / UNC-CH

 

On 3/14/2012 7:44 PM, Vlade Ristevski wrote:
  I should mention too, that I don't know exactly how much of the cost is pushed onto the student. I just know it comes out of the residence life budget and not the general IT budget.

Or in our case, "student" fees across the board, or "housing" students.  We are in the 25-30% residential bracket, the rest are local or commuter.  Yet there are increasing costs clearly associated with "residential" students -- the late night peaks, mostly Netflix, etc.  And we have had issues funding wireless in housing as well.  If you're already funded out of "housing" you're a step ahead of us.

Jeff
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from chickernell@clarion.edu

Academic departments should not pay for residence hall services.  Do the academic departments pay for a portion of the student’s text books?  Why would they pay for a portion of the Internet? The student’s Internet use is personal regardless of what they are doing—entertainment or classwork.  If that same student lived off campus, then he would be responsible for paying for his own Internet service—it is not subsidized by the University.  Students are not required to do coursework from their residence hall rooms. The University provides computer labs that are funded by academic departments/tech fees that have all the required applications and can be used by students for free.

 

Yes, the Internet is ubiquitous and we cannot live without it.  But how and where we use it is still a personal choice.

 

Christopher Hickernell, CCNA, MCSE

Network Support Specialist, ResNet Manager

Clarion University of Pennsylvania

Center for Computing Services

G-13 Still Hall, Clarion, PA 16214

chickernell@clarion.edu | 814.393.2218

 

“To be a long-term success, you have to have failures.  People who are working near their limit make mistakes and take risk.”

~Gerry McCartney, Purdue University

 

 

 

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