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Today it is AppleTV, tomorrow it will be a different device/use/software.  The underlying issue, as others have noted, is the Bonjour resource discovery mechanism, what Apple likely needs is a directory service.  Once that is solved, the problem will then shift to authentication/authorization/accounting and scalability.  I'd suggest:

That Apple create non-Bonjour/non-multicast discovery mechanisms that scale in large enterprise environments.
That Apple integrate their offerings with enterprise AAA services.





-William



********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Message from toivo@usf.edu

Also, for me, the lack of support for WPA2-Enterprise is a head-scratcher. If they go through the trouble of supporting the rest of the encryption schemes, and obviously support it on a bunch of their other products, why randomly leave it out of some products? I’d prioritize that a bit more, personally.

 

--

Toivo Voll

Network Engineer

Information Technology Communications

University of South Florida

 

I would also offer that the beginning narrative includes something to the effect of “with Apple client device penetration of 50% or more on the typical campus environment, amounting to thousands of Apple client devices per campus with the desire to use their AppleTV and other Bonjour/Airplay based devices on standards-based, enterprise-secure wireless networks…” sort of thing showing scale of issue and that we simply want the gadgets to play by standards and enterprise methods.

 

 

-Lee

 

 

Message from neil-johnson@uiowa.edu

How does this sound for an update (The latest is posted on the Facebook site):

We the undersigned academic and research institutions hereby solemnly request that Apple provide support for Bonjour/Airplay technology in enterprise networks.

 

With an Apple client device penetration of 50% or more on the typical campus, this amounts to thousands of Apple client devices whose owners desire to use their Apple TV and other Bonjour/Airplay based devices in classrooms, conference rooms, and in other locations on standards-based, enterprise-secure networks.

 

Specifically, we request the following (in order of priority):

 

  • That Apple establish a way for  Apple TV's (and other Bonjour/Airplay enabled devices) be accessible across multiple IPv4 and IPv6 sub-nets.
  • That the Apple TV support Enterprise Wireless Encryption and Authentication (WPA2-Enterprise).
  • That authentication to the Apple TV be able to utilize enterprise Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA) services.

 

Any enterprise Bonjour/Airplay solution needs to meet the following criteria:

 

  • It must scale to 100's-1000's of Bonjour/Airplay enabled devices.
  • It must work with wired and wireless networks from different vendors.
  • It must not significantly negatively impact network traffic (wired and wireless).
  • It must be easily manageable at scale.
  • If it requires a separate hardware solution, that the solution must be enterprise grade (rack mountable, dual power supplies, etc.)
  • It must be provided at a reasonable cost

 

Failure to provide this support severely limits the usefulness (and desirability) of Apple

products in our institutions.

 

At your earliest convenience please provide us with a road map for support of Bonjour/Airplay and related technologies in enterprise network environments.

 

Thank you.

-- 
Neil Johnson
Network Engineer
The University of Iowa
Phone: 319 384-0938
Fax: 319 335-2951
Mobile: 319 540-2081
E-Mail: neil-johnson@uiowa.edu


Looking better. If we can get this to gel, and to the point where the majority of the schools sign on in a form that we can each present to our Apple reps (or however it gets to Apple), I have clearance to cover it for Network Computing Magazine for a bit of press.

 

-Lee

 

Lee H. Badman

Wireless/Network Engineer

Information Technology and Services

Adjunct Instructor, iSchool

Syracuse University

315 443-3003

 

 

Nice and thank you

 

Message from neil-johnson@uiowa.edu



First, I'm not beholden to the text of the petition.  If someone has suggestions for improving it, or re-writing it. I'm listening.

Second, What would be the best way to collect "official" signatures to the petition ?

Thrid, should we be engaging EDUCAUSE to see if they would publish an official press-release ?

Thanks.

-Neil

-- 
Neil Johnson
Network Engineer
The University of Iowa
Phone: 319 384-0938
Fax: 319 335-2951
Mobile: 319 540-2081
E-Mail: neil-johnson@uiowa.edu


As for the collecting signatures, I wonder if we could use something like this:

http://www.change.org/petition

It can be linked with the FB page. There also seems to be several FB apps that lend themselves to creating online petitions, not that I have ever used them.

 

I think approaching EDUCAUSE to see what weight they can lend is a great idea.

 

Regards,


-- Jim



 

Jim Moskwa
Manager Networks

Information Technology Department


Johnson & Wales University


8 Abbott Park Place


Providence, RI 02903


Office: 401-598-1556

Mobile: 401-249-0579

eFax: 401-223-4998


Email: james.moskwa@jwu.edu

 

 

 

Message from avoelker@email.wcu.edu

That confuses me as well.  It is obviously built in to many other iOS devices (iPod Touch, iPad) and has been for some time.  Why the change?  I suspect it just due to the GUI difference.  If so, that’s easily fixable.

 

-- Andy Voelker

Manager of Student Computing in the Technology Commons

WCU Staff Senator

Western Carolina University

Check the status of your IT requests at any time at http://help.wcu.edu/ !

 

Please consider this- as we get to the point where we have an agreed on document, say by this Friday, and we find an online petition site to use where individuals can "sign" on in whatever form that takes before we close the signing window and present it to Apple- are each one of us able to do so on behalf of our institutions or organizations? If you need to seek permission, now is the time. If a CIO or Director is the only one allowed to make such public-facing declarations on behalf of your school/or org, it would be good to start working the notion. Ideally, no one would overstep their position by jumping on this worthy endeavor.

 

Lee H. Badman

Wireless Architect/Network Engineer

Information Technology and Services

Adjunct Instructor, iSchool

Syracuse University

315 443-3003

 

 

I think there is a point that is being missed here.

 

It appears that Apple may have *purposely* designed these devices & protocols for the consumer environment, not for the enterprise.

 

Since Apple TV supports WPA2-Personal, it would likely have not been much more effort to support WPA2-Enterprise. Perhaps enterprise was not their target market. If they supported WPA2-Enterprise they would also need robust management tools for Apple TV since WPA2-Enterprise is not used in the consumer market.

 

Perhaps Apple is intentionally ignoring the enterprise market segment. If that is the case, the petition may not have much effect.

 

Bruce Osborne

Network Engineer

IT Network Services

 

(434) 592-4229

 

LIBERTY UNIVERSITY

Training Champions for Christ since 1971

 

Not for the enterprise?

 

“AirPlay Mirroring is made for an audience. Because with a click, what’s on your Mac is also on your HDTV. It’s easy to set up with Apple TV. Show web pages and videos to friends on the couch, share lessons with a classroom, or present to a conference room. “

http://www.apple.com/osx/whats-new/

 

Also, there are plenty of devices that support wpa2 enterprise that don’t have robust management tools.

 

Pete M.

 

I’m in support of the collective request to help enable further operational flexibility, although also not sure Apple will feel enough pressure to assist.

 

To the first item:  ‘That Apple establish a way for  Apple TV's (and other Bonjour/Airplay enabled devices) be accessible across multiple IPv4 and IPv6 sub-nets.”

Isn’t this item solved to a degree by wide area DNS-SD?

If not, I assume this is left open to solve by either making it use a routable mcast addr or by creating some non-standard solution.

 

Controls will be needed to make sense of all the advertised services and possibly for security/privacy reasons. 

I would think navigating a large Bonjour enabled subnet for a production service must be an ugly exercise - nevermind if enabled to pass L2 boundaries.

Who remembers those IPX service filtering ACLs?  Request #2 might soon follow to network vendors to be able to support Bonjour service filtering.

 

For production services, wide area DNS-SD seems a better tool to me, as opposed to using the wild west of zeroconf end device advertisements or some special hardware solution.  We’ve trialed it (static entries) for printing and it seems to work well.  

This leverages our existing DNS infrastructure, allows for control of the advertised entries, and a uniform naming convention making it easier to identify the service. 

One could also opt to block 224.0.0.251 altogether, if there is concern about unnecessary device traffic. 

 

So in tandem to supporting this request, I’d also be interested in anyone’s recap of their wide area DNS-SD (WAB) environment, the services being advertised , how it is scaling, and any major stumbling blocks.

 

 

Message from bjohnson5@partners.org

How about 802.11r Fast Roaming/Proactive Key Caching? Thanks, Bruce T. Johnson | Network Engineer | Partners Healthcare 617.726.9662 | Pager: 31633 | bjohnson5@partners.org 149 13th Street, 10th Floor, Mailstop 10055B, Charlestown, Ma 02129
Message from jesse-rink@wi.rr.com

All this chat about the Apple Petition yet I don’t seem to find a link for it anywhere?  Did I miss this in past messages?  Can’t seem to locate anything..


Thanks

J

 

Message from neil-johnson@uiowa.edu

We looked into DNS-SD,   but with entries like this (example taken from an earlier e-mail from Oscar Silva at the Univ. or Texas , and confirmed by our own testing):

_airplay._tcp PTR utnet-appletv._airplay._tcp utnet-appletv._airplay._tcp SRV 0 0 7000 utnet-appletv.bonjour.utexas.edu. ; Replace with unicast FQDN of target host utnet-appletv._airplay._tcp TXT "deviceid=28:E7:CF:DB:6E:E0" "features=0x39f7" "model=AppleTV2,1" "pw=1" "srcvers=120.2" _raop._tcp PTR 28E7CFDB6EE0@utnet-appletv._raop._tcp 28E7CFDB6EE0@utnet-appletv._raop._tcp SRV 0 0 49152 utnet-appletv.bonjour.utexas.edu. ; Replace with unicast FQDN of target host 28E7CFDB6EE0@utnet-appletv._raop._tcp TXT "txtvers=1" "ch=2" "cn=0,1,2,3" "da=true" "et=0,3" "md=0,1,2" "pw=true" "sv=false" "sr=44100" "ss=16" "tp=UDP" "vn=65537" "vs=120.2" "am=AppleTV2,1" "sf=0x4" _appletv-v2._tcp PTR 35CF2488F02660B1._appletv-v2._tcp 35CF2488F02660B1._appletv-v2._tcp SRV 0 0 3689 utnet- appletv.bonjour.utexas.edu. ; Replace with unicast FQDN of target host 35CF2488F02660B1._appletv-v2._tcp TXT "txtvers=1" "hG=00000000-06f6-4f5d-0171-0bcc51d34d14" "MniT=167845888" "fs=2" "Name=utnet-appletv" "PrVs=65538" "DFID=2" "EiTS=1" "MiTPV=196611" _sleep-proxy._udp PTR 70-35-60-63\032utnet-appletv._sleep-proxy._udp 70-35-60-63\032utnet-appletv._sleep-proxy._udp SRV 0 0 55597 utnet-appletv.bonjour.utexas.edu. ; Replace with unicast FQDN of target host 70-35-60-63\032utnet-appletv._sleep-proxy._udp TXT ""

required for every Apple TV  (and no direction from Apple on what entries/fields are actually required) our DNS admins  were ready with pitch forks and torches if we attempted saddle them with the the responsibility of trying to maintain records for 100's such devices (not to mention printers, etc.).

-Neil

-- 
Neil Johnson
Network Engineer
The University of Iowa
Phone: 319 384-0938
Fax: 319 335-2951
Mobile: 319 540-2081
E-Mail: neil-johnson@uiowa.edu


Message from neil-johnson@uiowa.edu

This is where I have been keeping the latest draft.


-Neil

-- 
Neil Johnson
Network Engineer
The University of Iowa
Phone: 319 384-0938
Fax: 319 335-2951
Mobile: 319 540-2081
E-Mail: neil-johnson@uiowa.edu


Message from jcoehoorn@york.edu

If those entries work, and are all that is needed, then we're not far from full support. It seems like we could get a tool or set of scripts to automate creating/modifying the needed records.

Sent from my iPad

Message from neil-johnson@uiowa.edu


My concern is that certain fields appear to contain dynamic information like the software version (see "srcvers=120.2) and other information (what does "35CF2488F02660B1" mean ?).

The only way it seems to collect this information is to connect the device to local net, run Bonjour Browser or run "dns-sd –Z" command on a MAC and copy and paste results into your DNS configs.

If certain data is dynamic then, you are out of luck.

-Neil

-- 
Neil Johnson
Network Engineer
The University of Iowa
Phone: 319 384-0938
Fax: 319 335-2951
Mobile: 319 540-2081
E-Mail: neil-johnson@uiowa.edu


From: Joel Coehoorn <jcoehoorn@YORK.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv <WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 7:22 PM
To: "WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Petition

If those entries work, and are all that is needed, then we're not far from full support. It seems like we could get a tool or set of scripts to automate creating/modifying the needed records.

Sent from my iPad

I might be misunderstanding something; if so please correct me. When I setup a Linux MDNS server the bonjour devices all auto registered with the DNS server so there were no entries I had to manually create. I used a subdomain to keep them from cluttering up the our root domain for all bonjour devices, but I only tested with a handful of devices and found that some devices would not query MDNS for the resource records. -Brian ________________________________________ From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Johnson, Neil M [neil-johnson@UIOWA.EDU] Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 8:41 PM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: Apple Petition My concern is that certain fields appear to contain dynamic information like the software version (see "srcvers=120.2) and other information (what does "35CF2488F02660B1" mean ?). The only way it seems to collect this information is to connect the device to local net, run Bonjour Browser or run "dns-sd –Z" command on a MAC and copy and paste results into your DNS configs. If certain data is dynamic then, you are out of luck. -Neil -- Neil Johnson Network Engineer The University of Iowa Phone: 319 384-0938 Fax: 319 335-2951 Mobile: 319 540-2081 E-Mail: neil-johnson@uiowa.edu From: Joel Coehoorn > Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv > Date: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 7:22 PM To: "WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" > Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Petition If those entries work, and are all that is needed, then we're not far from full support. It seems like we could get a tool or set of scripts to automate creating/modifying the needed records. Sent from my iPad
Message from jmdanner@samford.edu

But it's still link-local and requires management of an enterprise-wide flat VLAN architecture. No IP addresses I can see. Just the hardware address. Don't we want something IP based similar to dynamic DNS? Microsoft provided WINS and then Active Directory to allow their OSes to move from local subnet broadcast based discovery. Novell used SLP when they moved from IPX to IP. Don't we want Apple to provide us with something similar? Mearl -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Kellogg, Brian D. Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 8:03 PM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Petition I might be misunderstanding something; if so please correct me. When I setup a Linux MDNS server the bonjour devices all auto registered with the DNS server so there were no entries I had to manually create. I used a subdomain to keep them from cluttering up the our root domain for all bonjour devices, but I only tested with a handful of devices and found that some devices would not query MDNS for the resource records. -Brian ________________________________________ From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Johnson, Neil M [neil-johnson@UIOWA.EDU] Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 8:41 PM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: Apple Petition My concern is that certain fields appear to contain dynamic information like the software version (see "srcvers=120.2) and other information (what does "35CF2488F02660B1" mean ?). The only way it seems to collect this information is to connect the device to local net, run Bonjour Browser or run "dns-sd -Z" command on a MAC and copy and paste results into your DNS configs. If certain data is dynamic then, you are out of luck. -Neil -- Neil Johnson Network Engineer The University of Iowa Phone: 319 384-0938 Fax: 319 335-2951 Mobile: 319 540-2081 E-Mail: neil-johnson@uiowa.edu From: Joel Coehoorn > Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv > Date: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 7:22 PM To: "WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" > Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Petition If those entries work, and are all that is needed, then we're not far from full support. It seems like we could get a tool or set of scripts to automate creating/modifying the needed records. Sent from my iPad
Message from chris@mit.edu

Honestly, if I could just enter a FQDN for an Apple TV or a printer I'd be ecstatic. -Chris
Message from neil-johnson@uiowa.edu

So, even if you setup static DNS-SD records, the Airplay receiver (Apple TV) and Airplay transmitter (iPad, iPhone, or Mac running Mountain Lion) have to be in the same subnet. That is the reason for the 1st request in the petition. -Neil -- Neil Johnson Network Engineer The University of Iowa Phone: 319 384-0938 Fax: 319 335-2951 Mobile: 319 540-2081 E-Mail: neil-johnson@uiowa.edu On 7/11/12 8:47 AM, "Chris Murphy" wrote: >Honestly, if I could just enter a FQDN for an Apple TV or a printer I'd >be ecstatic. > >-Chris > >
From what I read the MDNS registration is link local, but once registered than other Bonjour clients can query the MDNS records and connect across VLANs. The issue I ran into is that most Bonjour clients I tested could not connect across VLANs. I thought the original post was more of a complaint on creating the resource records manually, sorry. -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Danner, Mearl Sent: Wednesday, July 11, 2012 9:44 AM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: Apple Petition But it's still link-local and requires management of an enterprise-wide flat VLAN architecture. No IP addresses I can see. Just the hardware address. Don't we want something IP based similar to dynamic DNS? Microsoft provided WINS and then Active Directory to allow their OSes to move from local subnet broadcast based discovery. Novell used SLP when they moved from IPX to IP. Don't we want Apple to provide us with something similar? Mearl -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Kellogg, Brian D. Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 8:03 PM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Petition I might be misunderstanding something; if so please correct me. When I setup a Linux MDNS server the bonjour devices all auto registered with the DNS server so there were no entries I had to manually create. I used a subdomain to keep them from cluttering up the our root domain for all bonjour devices, but I only tested with a handful of devices and found that some devices would not query MDNS for the resource records. -Brian ________________________________________ From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Johnson, Neil M [neil-johnson@UIOWA.EDU] Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 8:41 PM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: Apple Petition My concern is that certain fields appear to contain dynamic information like the software version (see "srcvers=120.2) and other information (what does "35CF2488F02660B1" mean ?). The only way it seems to collect this information is to connect the device to local net, run Bonjour Browser or run "dns-sd -Z" command on a MAC and copy and paste results into your DNS configs. If certain data is dynamic then, you are out of luck. -Neil -- Neil Johnson Network Engineer The University of Iowa Phone: 319 384-0938 Fax: 319 335-2951 Mobile: 319 540-2081 E-Mail: neil-johnson@uiowa.edu From: Joel Coehoorn > Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv > Date: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 7:22 PM To: "WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" > Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Petition If those entries work, and are all that is needed, then we're not far from full support. It seems like we could get a tool or set of scripts to automate creating/modifying the needed records. Sent from my iPad
Yep -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Chris Murphy Sent: Wednesday, July 11, 2012 9:48 AM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: Apple Petition Honestly, if I could just enter a FQDN for an Apple TV or a printer I'd be ecstatic. -Chris
I agree. The ability to enter a FQDN or ip would be a huge (and sufficient) step forward. I can imagine all sorts of more complicated discovery methods (ideally where some central server gives one access to specific AppleTVs based on location and credentials) but that doesn't seem like a request that would get very far with apple. I think asking for a way to have the client specify by IP or host name is a very modest request, and probably the only reason apple hasn't done it is because they don't think their customers "want" that. A petition would be a way to show them that a large number of their customers do want that. Ethan On 07/11/2012 08:47 AM, Chris Murphy wrote: > Honestly, if I could just enter a FQDN for an Apple TV or a printer I'd be ecstatic. > > -Chris > >
Like it or not, Bonjour exists and users desire the service discovery promoted and which they have in their home/local subnet as they move within the enterprise. All enterprise solutions seem kludgey to different degrees, but we're trying to make a non-routed protocol act like one. A current solution might therefore involve using more than one method. Native Bonjour: uses link-local mDNS , not going to work across subnets without help. Direct FQDN use: It may be a nice option to have but I don't think it scales well as it would increase endUser support. The service discovery method is to call the NOC to find out the FQDN. DNS-SD: static, manageable service entries across subnets utilizing standard DNS procedures. Dynamic ad-hoc entries trickier. Fail for AppleTV - cannot be used for AppleTV/Airplay by Apple design (see Oscar@UTexas msg 12/20/11). Cisco: McastVlan feature forwards the advertisement through from remote subnet to the clients WLANs, with VlanSelect enabling Airplay 'across' subnets (bridge with one-way m/bcast? Not 100% sure what's going on here). Be wary of sleeping Bonjour devices. As documented, VlanSelect does not solve all uses, ex. where bidirectional (Bonjour) flow would be required (messaging/iTunes sharing). Their Bonjour solution for these services would make use of an Avahi gateway. Nevermind adding another appliance to the mix, without an ability to granularly filter services it seems like a looming problem to me. Aruba/Others: Perhaps those using other infrastructures can add their vendor's solutions. If Bonjour advertisements are bridged/reflected or someday using routed mcast, I'd think we'll need filtering controls to limit confusion and perhaps for security & privacy concerns. The same issue as the Avahi gateway above. As I finish this, I see we just got a request from a campus dept to help with Airplay/wireless for their AppleTV device they just installed. ;-) Perhaps if Apple cannot assist us in making this any more manageable within an enterprise, we'll be driven to find other solutions and say BonVoyage. > -----Original Message----- > From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv > [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Chris > Murphy > Sent: Wednesday, July 11, 2012 9:48 AM > To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU > Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Petition > > Honestly, if I could just enter a FQDN for an Apple TV or a printer I'd be > ecstatic. > > -Chris > >
Neil et al.,

About the petition, I would like to provide two comments:
(sorry for the delay, I was enjoying a few days off in NYC... man what a city!)

1) l would propose not  to ask to support  in "enterprise networks" but in "Academic Environments".
    Though many of our networks are run like enterprise networks, we are unique in three ways for this petition:
   - We have one of the largest Apple Devices penetration one can imagine (as you mention already in the petition)
  - The vast majority of the devices on our networks do not belong to the enterprise but to users (we were doing BYOD
     before Wi-Fi existed)
   -Our users want to use every cool gadget that Apple can think of, the day of the release.

Apple persists in saying that they do not support "enterprise" deployments, but they do emphasize "education".
So, let's use the lingo to convince them to help us.

2) To introduce our demands, why not list our use cases first (I'll start by listing the two use cases that we have encountered so far, more can be listed)

e.g.:

Use case #1
-Our faculty insists on bringing AppleTV in conference rooms, but we run WPA2-enterprise and cannot support large Multicast domains
 This brings two problems: 
 -The Apple TV cannot join our existing networks without using ugly network "detours" (we can temporally support a few exceptions but noting campus wide)
-Those Apple TVs cannot be controlled by i-devices, only the infrared remote control (and the password can be seen being typed by all members of the audience)

Use case #2
-Students want to operate Apple TVs in dormitories. Unlike private houses, our dormitories are run as large networks.
 As in use case #1 this generates 2 problems: join the network and control the device using "Bonjour".

This will make the petition a little longer, but can make the reader understand our challenges a little better.

Philippe

Philippe Hanset
University of Tennessee, Knoxville



the current text of the petition :
We the undersigned academic and research institutions request that Apple provide support for Bonjour/Airplay technology in enterprise networks.

 

With an Apple client device penetration of 50% or more on the typical campus, this amounts to thousands of Apple client devices whose owners desire to use their Apple TV and other Bonjour/Airplay based devices in classrooms, conference rooms, and in other locations on standards-based, enterprise-secure networks.

 

Specifically, we request the following (in order of priority):

 

  • That Apple establish a way for  Apple TV's (and other Bonjour/Airplay enabled devices) be accessible across multiple IPv4 and IPv6 sub-nets.
  • That the Apple TV support Enterprise Wireless Encryption and Authentication (WPA2-Enterprise).
  • That authentication to the Apple TV be able to utilize enterprise Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA) services.

 

Any enterprise Bonjour/Airplay solution needs to meet the following criteria:

 

  • It must scale to 100's-1000's of Bonjour/Airplay enabled devices.
  • It must work with wired and wireless networks from different vendors.
  • It must not significantly negatively impact network traffic (wired and wireless).
  • It must be easily manageable at scale.
  • If it requires a separate hardware solution, that the solution must be enterprise grade (rack mountable, dual power supplies, etc.)
  • It must be provided at a reasonable cost

 

Providing support for Boujour and Airplay Technologies on enterprise networks would benefit both our institutions and Apple by allowing Apple device owners the ability to use their devices as teaching and research aids, increasing the utility of and desirability of those devices.

 

We would be happy to collaborate with Apple in the development of enterprise support for these devices.

 

Thank you.

Message from neil-johnson@uiowa.edu

Okay, based on the comments that I have received, I've modified the text as below.  If there are any major issues please let me know.

 

I know there are a lot of other things people would like to request from Apple in terms of Enterprise support for their products, but let's start with this and see where it goes.

 

Thanks for all your feedback!

 

-Neil

 

We the undersigned academic and research institutions request that Apple provide improved support for Airplay and Bonjour technologies in our academic environments.

 

Our institutions are seeing an Apple client device penetration of 50% on our campuses. This amounts to thousands of Apple client devices whose owners desire to use their Apple TV and other Bonjour enabled devices in a variety of scenarios:

 

  • Based on Apple's own advertising, our faculty, staff, and students are  requesting that we provide Apple TVs in our conference rooms, laboratories, and auditoriums so that they may use Airplay technology for presentations and demonstrations.
  • Our faculty, staff, and students are requesting the ability to utilize Airprint to print from their Apple devices on our enterprise networks.
  • Our students want to operate Apple TVs in their dormitory rooms which often utilize our institutions' enterprise wireless and wired networks.

 

Unfortunately, the following limitations of Apple's Apple TV, Airplay, and Bonjour technologies make it very difficult to support these scenarios on our standard's based enterprise networks:

 

  • Airplay does not work when Apple TV's and Apple client devices are on different IP subnets. It is common for the enterprise wireless and wired networks in our institutions to utilize different IP subnets.
  • Bonjour technologies also do not work in a scalable, sustainable fashion between different IP subnets. Work arounds such as Wide-Area Bonjour (DNS-SD) and Dynamic DNS updates  have  major scalability and security issues in enterprise networks.
  • For performance and security reasons, many of our institutions do not enable  IP multicast on their enterprise wireless networks. This limits the usefulness of current Bonjour technologies.
  • The majority of our institutions' enterprise wireless networks utilize WPA2-Enterprise authentication and encryption.  Current Apple TV's cannot connect to these networks even though the majority of Apple's other devices can.
  • The security method used to connect Apple devices to Apple TVs (a single password per Apple TV) opens the devices to "hijacking" by unauthorized users.

 

 Specifically, we request the following:

 

  • That Apple establish a way for Apple TV's  be accessible from Apple's client devices across multiple IPv4 and IPv6 sub-nets.
  • That Apple improve Bonjour technology so that it will work in scalable and supportable fashion in large enterprise wireless and wired networks.
  • That the Apple TV support enterprise wireless encryption and authentication (WPA2-Enterprise).
  • That authentication between Apple devices and the Apple TV be able to utilize enterprise Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA) services.

 

Any enterprise Airplay/ Bonjour solution needs to meet the following criteria:

 

  • It must scale to 100's - 1000's of Airplay and Bonjour enabled devices.
  • It must work with wired and wireless networks from different vendors.
  • It must not significantly negatively impact network traffic (wired and wireless).
  • It must be easily manageable at an enterprise scale.
  • If it requires a separate hardware solution, that the solution must be enterprise grade (rack mountable, dual power supplies, etc.)
  • It must be provided at a reasonable cost

 

Providing support for Bonjour and Airplay Technologies on enterprise networks would benefit both our institutions and Apple by allowing Apple device owners the ability to use their devices as teaching and research aids, increasing the utility of and desirability of those devices.

 

We would be happy to collaborate with Apple in improving the support for these devices in our environments.

 

Thank you.


 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] on behalf of Hanset, Philippe C [phanset@UTK.EDU]
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 3:55 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Petition

Neil et al.,

About the petition, I would like to provide two comments:
(sorry for the delay, I was enjoying a few days off in NYC... man what a city!)

1) l would propose not  to ask to support  in "enterprise networks" but in "Academic Environments".
    Though many of our networks are run like enterprise networks, we are unique in three ways for this petition:
   - We have one of the largest Apple Devices penetration one can imagine (as you mention already in the petition)
  - The vast majority of the devices on our networks do not belong to the enterprise but to users (we were doing BYOD
     before Wi-Fi existed)
   -Our users want to use every cool gadget that Apple can think of, the day of the release.

Apple persists in saying that they do not support "enterprise" deployments, but they do emphasize "education".
So, let's use the lingo to convince them to help us.

2) To introduce our demands, why not list our use cases first (I'll start by listing the two use cases that we have encountered so far, more can be listed)

e.g.:

Use case #1
-Our faculty insists on bringing AppleTV in conference rooms, but we run WPA2-enterprise and cannot support large Multicast domains
 This brings two problems: 
 -The Apple TV cannot join our existing networks without using ugly network "detours" (we can temporally support a few exceptions but noting campus wide)
-Those Apple TVs cannot be controlled by i-devices, only the infrared remote control (and the password can be seen being typed by all members of the audience)

Use case #2
-Students want to operate Apple TVs in dormitories. Unlike private houses, our dormitories are run as large networks.
 As in use case #1 this generates 2 problems: join the network and control the device using "Bonjour".

This will make the petition a little longer, but can make the reader understand our challenges a little better.

Philippe

Philippe Hanset
University of Tennessee, Knoxville



the current text of the petition :
We the undersigned academic and research institutions request that Apple provide support for Bonjour/Airplay technology in enterprise networks.

 

With an Apple client device penetration of 50% or more on the typical campus, this amounts to thousands of Apple client devices whose owners desire to use their Apple TV and other Bonjour/Airplay based devices in classrooms, conference rooms, and in other locations on standards-based, enterprise-secure networks.

 

Specifically, we request the following (in order of priority):

 

  • That Apple establish a way for  Apple TV's (and other Bonjour/Airplay enabled devices) be accessible across multiple IPv4 and IPv6 sub-nets.
  • That the Apple TV support Enterprise Wireless Encryption and Authentication (WPA2-Enterprise).
  • That authentication to the Apple TV be able to utilize enterprise Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA) services.

 

Any enterprise Bonjour/Airplay solution needs to meet the following criteria:

 

  • It must scale to 100's-1000's of Bonjour/Airplay enabled devices.
  • It must work with wired and wireless networks from different vendors.
  • It must not significantly negatively impact network traffic (wired and wireless).
  • It must be easily manageable at scale.
  • If it requires a separate hardware solution, that the solution must be enterprise grade (rack mountable, dual power supplies, etc.)
  • It must be provided at a reasonable cost

 

Providing support for Boujour and Airplay Technologies on enterprise networks would benefit both our institutions and Apple by allowing Apple device owners the ability to use their devices as teaching and research aids, increasing the utility of and desirability of those devices.

 

We would be happy to collaborate with Apple in the development of enterprise support for these devices.

 

Thank you.

Thanks very much, Neil and everyone. At the risk of sounding too formal, we're calling the agreed upon comment period closed. If we get any traction with Apple, it stands to reason that we should be able to identify other discussion points and perhaps address them as well, but for now, Neil's latest draft is what we'll work with.

We now have two CIOs also interested in lending weight to the effort, and so it will be going to the CIO Educause group next. Ideally, they would be as quick and responsive as we have all been in moving this along. Getting the top IT functionaries from each institution should make that much more effective of a point (if it is at all possible to get Apple's attention at all).

Updates to follow.

-Lee


Lee H. Badman
Wireless/Network Engineer, ITS
Adjunct Instructor, iSchool
Syracuse University
315.443.3003
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] on behalf of Johnson, Neil M [neil-johnson@UIOWA.EDU]
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2012 2:54 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Petition

Okay, based on the comments that I have received, I've modified the text as below.  If there are any major issues please let me know.

 

I know there are a lot of other things people would like to request from Apple in terms of Enterprise support for their products, but let's start with this and see where it goes.

 

Thanks for all your feedback!

 

-Neil

 

We the undersigned academic and research institutions request that Apple provide improved support for Airplay and Bonjour technologies in our academic environments.

 

Our institutions are seeing an Apple client device penetration of 50% on our campuses. This amounts to thousands of Apple client devices whose owners desire to use their Apple TV and other Bonjour enabled devices in a variety of scenarios:

 

  • Based on Apple's own advertising, our faculty, staff, and students are  requesting that we provide Apple TVs in our conference rooms, laboratories, and auditoriums so that they may use Airplay technology for presentations and demonstrations.
  • Our faculty, staff, and students are requesting the ability to utilize Airprint to print from their Apple devices on our enterprise networks.
  • Our students want to operate Apple TVs in their dormitory rooms which often utilize our institutions' enterprise wireless and wired networks.

 

Unfortunately, the following limitations of Apple's Apple TV, Airplay, and Bonjour technologies make it very difficult to support these scenarios on our standard's based enterprise networks:

 

  • Airplay does not work when Apple TV's and Apple client devices are on different IP subnets. It is common for the enterprise wireless and wired networks in our institutions to utilize different IP subnets.
  • Bonjour technologies also do not work in a scalable, sustainable fashion between different IP subnets. Work arounds such as Wide-Area Bonjour (DNS-SD) and Dynamic DNS updates  have  major scalability and security issues in enterprise networks.
  • For performance and security reasons, many of our institutions do not enable  IP multicast on their enterprise wireless networks. This limits the usefulness of current Bonjour technologies.
  • The majority of our institutions' enterprise wireless networks utilize WPA2-Enterprise authentication and encryption.  Current Apple TV's cannot connect to these networks even though the majority of Apple's other devices can.
  • The security method used to connect Apple devices to Apple TVs (a single password per Apple TV) opens the devices to "hijacking" by unauthorized users.

 

 Specifically, we request the following:

 

  • That Apple establish a way for Apple TV's  be accessible from Apple's client devices across multiple IPv4 and IPv6 sub-nets.
  • That Apple improve Bonjour technology so that it will work in scalable and supportable fashion in large enterprise wireless and wired networks.
  • That the Apple TV support enterprise wireless encryption and authentication (WPA2-Enterprise).
  • That authentication between Apple devices and the Apple TV be able to utilize enterprise Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA) services.

 

Any enterprise Airplay/ Bonjour solution needs to meet the following criteria:

 

  • It must scale to 100's - 1000's of Airplay and Bonjour enabled devices.
  • It must work with wired and wireless networks from different vendors.
  • It must not significantly negatively impact network traffic (wired and wireless).
  • It must be easily manageable at an enterprise scale.
  • If it requires a separate hardware solution, that the solution must be enterprise grade (rack mountable, dual power supplies, etc.)
  • It must be provided at a reasonable cost

 

Providing support for Bonjour and Airplay Technologies on enterprise networks would benefit both our institutions and Apple by allowing Apple device owners the ability to use their devices as teaching and research aids, increasing the utility of and desirability of those devices.

 

We would be happy to collaborate with Apple in improving the support for these devices in our environments.

 

Thank you.


 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] on behalf of Hanset, Philippe C [phanset@UTK.EDU]
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 3:55 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Petition

Neil et al.,

About the petition, I would like to provide two comments:
(sorry for the delay, I was enjoying a few days off in NYC... man what a city!)

1) l would propose not  to ask to support  in "enterprise networks" but in "Academic Environments".
    Though many of our networks are run like enterprise networks, we are unique in three ways for this petition:
   - We have one of the largest Apple Devices penetration one can imagine (as you mention already in the petition)
  - The vast majority of the devices on our networks do not belong to the enterprise but to users (we were doing BYOD
     before Wi-Fi existed)
   -Our users want to use every cool gadget that Apple can think of, the day of the release.

Apple persists in saying that they do not support "enterprise" deployments, but they do emphasize "education".
So, let's use the lingo to convince them to help us.

2) To introduce our demands, why not list our use cases first (I'll start by listing the two use cases that we have encountered so far, more can be listed)

e.g.:

Use case #1
-Our faculty insists on bringing AppleTV in conference rooms, but we run WPA2-enterprise and cannot support large Multicast domains
 This brings two problems: 
 -The Apple TV cannot join our existing networks without using ugly network "detours" (we can temporally support a few exceptions but noting campus wide)
-Those Apple TVs cannot be controlled by i-devices, only the infrared remote control (and the password can be seen being typed by all members of the audience)

Use case #2
-Students want to operate Apple TVs in dormitories. Unlike private houses, our dormitories are run as large networks.
 As in use case #1 this generates 2 problems: join the network and control the device using "Bonjour".

This will make the petition a little longer, but can make the reader understand our challenges a little better.

Philippe

Philippe Hanset
University of Tennessee, Knoxville



the current text of the petition :
We the undersigned academic and research institutions request that Apple provide support for Bonjour/Airplay technology in enterprise networks.

 

With an Apple client device penetration of 50% or more on the typical campus, this amounts to thousands of Apple client devices whose owners desire to use their Apple TV and other Bonjour/Airplay based devices in classrooms, conference rooms, and in other locations on standards-based, enterprise-secure networks.

 

Specifically, we request the following (in order of priority):

 

  • That Apple establish a way for  Apple TV's (and other Bonjour/Airplay enabled devices) be accessible across multiple IPv4 and IPv6 sub-nets.
  • That the Apple TV support Enterprise Wireless Encryption and Authentication (WPA2-Enterprise).
  • That authentication to the Apple TV be able to utilize enterprise Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA) services.

 

Any enterprise Bonjour/Airplay solution needs to meet the following criteria:

 

  • It must scale to 100's-1000's of Bonjour/Airplay enabled devices.
  • It must work with wired and wireless networks from different vendors.
  • It must not significantly negatively impact network traffic (wired and wireless).
  • It must be easily manageable at scale.
  • If it requires a separate hardware solution, that the solution must be enterprise grade (rack mountable, dual power supplies, etc.)
  • It must be provided at a reasonable cost

 

Providing support for Boujour and Airplay Technologies on enterprise networks would benefit both our institutions and Apple by allowing Apple device owners the ability to use their devices as teaching and research aids, increasing the utility of and desirability of those devices.

 

We would be happy to collaborate with Apple in the development of enterprise support for these devices.

 

Thank you.

Message from fligor@illinois.edu

I really thought that Philipe's comments about not using the term "enterprise network" was well founded. The change was made in the first sentence below, but not carried throughout the full document.  That update needs to be made consistently.  Sorry I didn't get this comment in more quickly.

-- 
-debbie
Sent from my iPad

On Jul 16, 2012, at 11:50, "Lee H Badman" <lhbadman@SYR.EDU> wrote:

Thanks very much, Neil and everyone. At the risk of sounding too formal, we're calling the agreed upon comment period closed. If we get any traction with Apple, it stands to reason that we should be able to identify other discussion points and perhaps address them as well, but for now, Neil's latest draft is what we'll work with.

We now have two CIOs also interested in lending weight to the effort, and so it will be going to the CIO Educause group next. Ideally, they would be as quick and responsive as we have all been in moving this along. Getting the top IT functionaries from each institution should make that much more effective of a point (if it is at all possible to get Apple's attention at all).

Updates to follow.

-Lee


Lee H. Badman
Wireless/Network Engineer, ITS
Adjunct Instructor, iSchool
Syracuse University
315.443.3003
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] on behalf of Johnson, Neil M [neil-johnson@UIOWA.EDU]
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2012 2:54 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Petition

Okay, based on the comments that I have received, I've modified the text as below.  If there are any major issues please let me know.

 

I know there are a lot of other things people would like to request from Apple in terms of Enterprise support for their products, but let's start with this and see where it goes.

 

Thanks for all your feedback!

 

-Neil

 

We the undersigned academic and research institutions request that Apple provide improved support for Airplay and Bonjour technologies in our academic environments.

 

Our institutions are seeing an Apple client device penetration of 50% on our campuses. This amounts to thousands of Apple client devices whose owners desire to use their Apple TV and other Bonjour enabled devices in a variety of scenarios:

 

  • Based on Apple's own advertising, our faculty, staff, and students are  requesting that we provide Apple TVs in our conference rooms, laboratories, and auditoriums so that they may use Airplay technology for presentations and demonstrations.
  • Our faculty, staff, and students are requesting the ability to utilize Airprint to print from their Apple devices on our enterprise networks.
  • Our students want to operate Apple TVs in their dormitory rooms which often utilize our institutions' enterprise wireless and wired networks.

 

Unfortunately, the following limitations of Apple's Apple TV, Airplay, and Bonjour technologies make it very difficult to support these scenarios on our standard's based enterprise networks:

 

  • Airplay does not work when Apple TV's and Apple client devices are on different IP subnets. It is common for the enterprise wireless and wired networks in our institutions to utilize different IP subnets.
  • Bonjour technologies also do not work in a scalable, sustainable fashion between different IP subnets. Work arounds such as Wide-Area Bonjour (DNS-SD) and Dynamic DNS updates  have  major scalability and security issues in enterprise networks.
  • For performance and security reasons, many of our institutions do not enable  IP multicast on their enterprise wireless networks. This limits the usefulness of current Bonjour technologies.
  • The majority of our institutions' enterprise wireless networks utilize WPA2-Enterprise authentication and encryption.  Current Apple TV's cannot connect to these networks even though the majority of Apple's other devices can.
  • The security method used to connect Apple devices to Apple TVs (a single password per Apple TV) opens the devices to "hijacking" by unauthorized users.

 

 Specifically, we request the following:

 

  • That Apple establish a way for Apple TV's  be accessible from Apple's client devices across multiple IPv4 and IPv6 sub-nets.
  • That Apple improve Bonjour technology so that it will work in scalable and supportable fashion in large enterprise wireless and wired networks.
  • That the Apple TV support enterprise wireless encryption and authentication (WPA2-Enterprise).
  • That authentication between Apple devices and the Apple TV be able to utilize enterprise Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA) services.

 

Any enterprise Airplay/ Bonjour solution needs to meet the following criteria:

 

  • It must scale to 100's - 1000's of Airplay and Bonjour enabled devices.
  • It must work with wired and wireless networks from different vendors.
  • It must not significantly negatively impact network traffic (wired and wireless).
  • It must be easily manageable at an enterprise scale.
  • If it requires a separate hardware solution, that the solution must be enterprise grade (rack mountable, dual power supplies, etc.)
  • It must be provided at a reasonable cost

 

Providing support for Bonjour and Airplay Technologies on enterprise networks would benefit both our institutions and Apple by allowing Apple device owners the ability to use their devices as teaching and research aids, increasing the utility of and desirability of those devices.

 

We would be happy to collaborate with Apple in improving the support for these devices in our environments.

 

Thank you.


 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] on behalf of Hanset, Philippe C [phanset@UTK.EDU]
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 3:55 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Petition

Neil et al.,

About the petition, I would like to provide two comments:
(sorry for the delay, I was enjoying a few days off in NYC... man what a city!)

1) l would propose not  to ask to support  in "enterprise networks" but in "Academic Environments".
    Though many of our networks are run like enterprise networks, we are unique in three ways for this petition:
   - We have one of the largest Apple Devices penetration one can imagine (as you mention already in the petition)
  - The vast majority of the devices on our networks do not belong to the enterprise but to users (we were doing BYOD
     before Wi-Fi existed)
   -Our users want to use every cool gadget that Apple can think of, the day of the release.

Apple persists in saying that they do not support "enterprise" deployments, but they do emphasize "education".
So, let's use the lingo to convince them to help us.

2) To introduce our demands, why not list our use cases first (I'll start by listing the two use cases that we have encountered so far, more can be listed)

e.g.:

Use case #1
-Our faculty insists on bringing AppleTV in conference rooms, but we run WPA2-enterprise and cannot support large Multicast domains
 This brings two problems: 
 -The Apple TV cannot join our existing networks without using ugly network "detours" (we can temporally support a few exceptions but noting campus wide)
-Those Apple TVs cannot be controlled by i-devices, only the infrared remote control (and the password can be seen being typed by all members of the audience)

Use case #2
-Students want to operate Apple TVs in dormitories. Unlike private houses, our dormitories are run as large networks.
 As in use case #1 this generates 2 problems: join the network and control the device using "Bonjour".

This will make the petition a little longer, but can make the reader understand our challenges a little better.

Philippe

Philippe Hanset
University of Tennessee, Knoxville



the current text of the petition :
We the undersigned academic and research institutions request that Apple provide support for Bonjour/Airplay technology in enterprise networks.

 

With an Apple client device penetration of 50% or more on the typical campus, this amounts to thousands of Apple client devices whose owners desire to use their Apple TV and other Bonjour/Airplay based devices in classrooms, conference rooms, and in other locations on standards-based, enterprise-secure networks.

 

Specifically, we request the following (in order of priority):

 

  • That Apple establish a way for  Apple TV's (and other Bonjour/Airplay enabled devices) be accessible across multiple IPv4 and IPv6 sub-nets.
  • That the Apple TV support Enterprise Wireless Encryption and Authentication (WPA2-Enterprise).
  • That authentication to the Apple TV be able to utilize enterprise Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA) services.

 

Any enterprise Bonjour/Airplay solution needs to meet the following criteria:

 

  • It must scale to 100's-1000's of Bonjour/Airplay enabled devices.
  • It must work with wired and wireless networks from different vendors.
  • It must not significantly negatively impact network traffic (wired and wireless).
  • It must be easily manageable at scale.
  • If it requires a separate hardware solution, that the solution must be enterprise grade (rack mountable, dual power supplies, etc.)
  • It must be provided at a reasonable cost

 

Providing support for Boujour and Airplay Technologies on enterprise networks would benefit both our institutions and Apple by allowing Apple device owners the ability to use their devices as teaching and research aids, increasing the utility of and desirability of those devices.

 

We would be happy to collaborate with Apple in the development of enterprise support for these devices.

 

Thank you.

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