Main Nav

Of the folks who are allowing users to do bonjour services over wifi. Either thru native multicast , or the enhancements from the various wifi vendors. Has anyone noticed spectrum issues in dense classrooms? I have a department who is proposing 12 screens with 12 apple tvs in room with 180 seats and I'm can't see how this can work given the crowded spectrum in large seat rooms. Has anyone tried multiple apple tvs in the same room with multiple users mirroring different content simultaneously ? Sent from my iPhone ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Message from jcoehoorn@york.edu

I think most of all, they wouldn't like the results even if the wireless worked. I imagine instructors will at some point expect to be able to mirror a single device to all twelve screens at once, so they all show the same thing, and I don't believe that Apple's AirPlay will work that way. It's my understanding that if they have 12 Apple TVs, they'll need to be running 12 separate iPads/iPhones/Macs to take advantage of those screens. If that's what they want to do, that's one thing... but somehow I don't see it being used that way. It seems much more likely that what they really want is one AppleTV connected to a redistributor that will show a single instructor's iPad across all 12 screen with only one connection, or if you have a good enough controller system, just those screens that the instructor selects.

Now, about the wireless actually working... hahahaha, how cute. What you could do is run a network drop for each AppleTV, and make sure the wired network drop gets an address from your wireless range, or is exposed to your wireless range via a bonjour gateway. That would at least take a lot of the traffic out of the rf space.



Joel Coehoorn
Director of Information Technology
York College, Nebraska
402.363.5603
jcoehoorn@york.edu

 

The mission of York College is to transform lives through Christ-centered education and to equip students for lifelong service to God, family, and society



Yes that’s definitely the plan to wire the apple tvs.  The way they envision this is having 12 displays and have students break out into smaller study/collaboration groups on the fly, with modular furniture that they can move to accomadate.  So it wouldn’t be an individual instructor controlling all 12.  It could be anyone of the 180 users in the class all of which either have ipad or iphone or both.

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Coehoorn, Joel
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 12:27 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

 

I think most of all, they wouldn't like the results even if the wireless worked. I imagine instructors will at some point expect to be able to mirror a single device to all twelve screens at once, so they all show the same thing, and I don't believe that Apple's AirPlay will work that way. It's my understanding that if they have 12 Apple TVs, they'll need to be running 12 separate iPads/iPhones/Macs to take advantage of those screens. If that's what they want to do, that's one thing... but somehow I don't see it being used that way. It seems much more likely that what they really want is one AppleTV connected to a redistributor that will show a single instructor's iPad across all 12 screen with only one connection, or if you have a good enough controller system, just those screens that the instructor selects.

 

Now, about the wireless actually working... hahahaha, how cute. What you could do is run a network drop for each AppleTV, and make sure the wired network drop gets an address from your wireless range, or is exposed to your wireless range via a bonjour gateway. That would at least take a lot of the traffic out of the rf space.

 


 

Joel Coehoorn
Director of Information Technology
York College, Nebraska
402.363.5603
jcoehoorn@york.edu

 

The mission of York College is to transform lives through Christ-centered education and to equip students for lifelong service to God, family, and society

 

Message from jcoehoorn@york.edu

I've been **very** happy using AirServer (www.airserverapp.com) instead of AppleTVs for mirroring. The software installs to a PC or Mac, and allows the computer to act as an AppleTV. It even supports multiple-simultaneous connections and recording(!) - (recording is currently Mac only, coming soon for PC). What connected classroom doesn't already have a PC or Mac where you could just install this program? And it's only $4 per classroom. That's not a typo.

The downside is that this does make demands on your network... namely, that your classroom PCs be on the same subnet as your wireless devices, or that you complete the same kind of mDNS gateway setup for the classroom computer that you would have needed to do for an AppleTV. 

I know this sounds a bit like an advertisement, but I'm just a *very* happy customer. We started a pilot with 12 real AppleTVs in the summer/early fall of 2012, and within a few weeks of discovering this we had ripped all of the AppleTVs out and deployed this campus-wide, for less than the smaller pilot program cost.

The software can be set to run all the time, or start on demand, though either way the user must be logged into a PC before it will accept a stream. I've found it works best when started on demand... this cuts down on the number of classrooms that show available for mirroring from the iPad, making it easier to find what you're looking for, and it also solves the issue of a random student or passerby interrupting a lecture already using the computer by kicking off a stream. Also, there was a bug for the PC version back in 2012 (since fixed) with running as a service, so that's just part of the deployment we have now.




Joel Coehoorn
Director of Information Technology
York College, Nebraska
402.363.5603
jcoehoorn@york.edu

 

The mission of York College is to transform lives through Christ-centered education and to equip students for lifelong service to God, family, and society



Hi Bruce,

Yes, ClearPass and AirGroup allows a user to define up to 10 other users that can "see" their personal device.

 

 

 

Tim Cappalli  |  ACCP /  ACMP /  CCNA

Network Engineer  |  Brandeis University

cappalli@brandeis.edu | (617) 701-7149

 

Hi everyone,

We took a slightly different approach to solve our issue with the AppleTV specifically at Penn State. We do have a Doceri deployment but recently we have released a PSU Airplay iOS enterprise app to allow mirroring to AppleTVs w/o having bonjour enabled. Since I saw this topic come up I thought it was a good time to share.

If interested you can find out more on a recent blog entry I wrote up on the specifics. 


Thanks,
Jason

p: (814) 865-1840, c: (814) 777-7665
Systems Administrator
Teaching and Learning with Technology, Information Technology Services
The Pennsylvania State University

Apple just released discovery over bluetooth in iOS 6.1. This is a major hurdle for most institutions as it no longer requires bonjour for discovery but instead relies on bluetooth. I’ve tested it and it works well. I wonder if they will add this support into OSX soon. http://gadgets.ndtv.com/tv/news/apple-tv-61-update-brings-airplay-securi... This certainly doesn't invalidate our work on our Mirror App, but for some it may be the missing piece which we were also providing. Mirror will also allow you to use AirServer and provides a way to connect to AppleTVs from remote locations. Either way, it’s about time Apple! Jason
Rather that should have read AppleTV 6.1 with iOS 7.1 is the winning combination. Both updates are required to use discovery over bluetooth.
Have you been able to get an osx 10.9 to see the apple tv via Bluetooth? -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Jason Heffner Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 8:48 AM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi Apple just released discovery over bluetooth in iOS 6.1. This is a major hurdle for most institutions as it no longer requires bonjour for discovery but instead relies on bluetooth. I've tested it and it works well. I wonder if they will add this support into OSX soon. http://gadgets.ndtv.com/tv/news/apple-tv-61-update-brings-airplay-securi... This certainly doesn't invalidate our work on our Mirror App, but for some it may be the missing piece which we were also providing. Mirror will also allow you to use AirServer and provides a way to connect to AppleTVs from remote locations. Either way, it's about time Apple! Jason
I'll bet support in 10.9 will be in the next patch. I don't think Apple even mentions this new feature in the release notes.
 
Jeff
 
>>> On Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 11:13 AM, in message <108BE36F63E8CC4C8C84A5DCE1C0D2A1B33C72B7@EXMBX07.ad.louisville.edu>, "Hurt,Trenton W." <trent.hurt@LOUISVILLE.EDU> wrote:
Have you been able to get an osx 10.9 to see the apple tv via Bluetooth?

-----Original Message-----
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Jason Heffner
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 8:48 AM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

Apple just released discovery over bluetooth in iOS 6.1. This is a major hurdle for most institutions as it no longer requires bonjour for discovery but instead relies on bluetooth. I've tested it and it works well. I wonder if they will add this support into OSX soon.

http://gadgets.ndtv.com/tv/news/apple-tv-61-update-brings-airplay-security-option-discovery-over-bluetooth-and-more-494249

This certainly doesn't invalidate our work on our Mirror App, but for some it may be the missing piece which we were also providing. Mirror will also allow you to use AirServer and provides a way to connect to AppleTVs from remote locations.

Either way, it's about time Apple!

Jason


Seems to be that way I can’t get my osx to see the apple tv but can see it from iOS 7.1 devices via Bluetooth.

 

Here is different website with some screens of doing airplay via Bluetooth

 

http://www.afp548.com/2014/03/10/hidden-airplay-feature-in-the-appletv-6-1-ios-7-1-update/

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Sessler
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 2:21 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

 

I'll bet support in 10.9 will be in the next patch. I don't think Apple even mentions this new feature in the release notes.

 

Jeff

 

>>> On Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 11:13 AM, in message <108BE36F63E8CC4C8C84A5DCE1C0D2A1B33C72B7@EXMBX07.ad.louisville.edu>, "Hurt,Trenton W." <trent.hurt@LOUISVILLE.EDU> wrote:

Have you been able to get an osx 10.9 to see the apple tv via Bluetooth?

-----Original Message-----
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Jason Heffner
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 8:48 AM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

Apple just released discovery over bluetooth in iOS 6.1. This is a major hurdle for most institutions as it no longer requires bonjour for discovery but instead relies on bluetooth. I've tested it and it works well. I wonder if they will add this support into OSX soon.

http://gadgets.ndtv.com/tv/news/apple-tv-61-update-brings-airplay-security-option-discovery-over-bluetooth-and-more-494249

This certainly doesn't invalidate our work on our Mirror App, but for some it may be the missing piece which we were also providing. Mirror will also allow you to use AirServer and provides a way to connect to AppleTVs from remote locations.

Either way, it's about time Apple!

Jason


I’ve not seen anything in OSX yet, but I’ve not installed the very latest 10.9.3 update. I came across the bluetooth discovery in iOS when I was testing out the beta. It hasn’t gotten any hype and was hoping that it would be leaked so I could talk about before it was released. We talked about doing the same thing with Bluetooth LE, then held off since Apple was going to release it.

Has anyone else had an issue getting the iPad to pair with the AppleTV via BlueTooth?  I've udpated both to the required versions, but they both just sit there spinning their wheels when trying to discover.

Respectfully,

Matthew "Will" Williams
Assistant Director, Networking
Bucknell University
570.577.1491


Have not done it myself yet, but a computing staff member here has it going nicely, with little effort.

Sent from my Android phone using TouchDown (www.nitrodesk.com)

-----Original Message-----
From: Matt Williams [mcw015@BUCKNELL.EDU]
Received: Wednesday, 12 Mar 2014, 16:03
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU]
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

Has anyone else had an issue getting the iPad to pair with the AppleTV via BlueTooth?  I've udpated both to the required versions, but they both just sit there spinning their wheels when trying to discover.

Respectfully,

Matthew "Will" Williams
Assistant Director, Networking
Bucknell University
570.577.1491


The AppleTV doesn’t need to paired via bluetooth. What is necessary for bluetooth discovery.

AppleTV: AppleTV 6.1 software update. You can install this through the updates menu. An active connection to a network.
iPad: iOS 7.1 and an active network connection accessible to the AppleTV to verify connectivity. Bluetooth enabled.

Once these two are met the AppleTV will be displayed the control center on the iPad for mirroring. I don’t know all the technical specifics of how the connection is made or how the bluetooth is sent and picked up by the iPad. Perhaps someone will pull it completely apart soon enough.

Jason

On Mar 12, 2014, at 4:02 PM, Matt Williams <mcw015@BUCKNELL.EDU> wrote:

Has anyone else had an issue getting the iPad to pair with the AppleTV via BlueTooth?  I've udpated both to the required versions, but they both just sit there spinning their wheels when trying to discover.

Respectfully,

Matthew "Will" Williams
Assistant Director, Networking
Bucknell University
570.577.1491


What version of ipad are you using? I tried it with an ipad 2 running latest ios with apple tv 3rd gen with latest os and couldn't get it to find the apple tv via airplay. It does work with ipad 3 and above. Also you don't really pair the device, it just discovers the apple tv over bluetooth. ------------------------------- Craig Pluchinsky IT Services Indiana University of Pennsylvania 724-357-3327 On Wed, 12 Mar 2014, Matt Williams wrote: > Has anyone else had an issue getting the iPad to pair with the AppleTV via BlueTooth?  I've udpated both to the required > versions, but they both just sit there spinning their wheels when trying to discover. > > Respectfully, > > Matthew "Will" Williams > Assistant Director, Networking > Bucknell University > 570.577.1491 > > >
On Wed Mar 12 2014 15:09:36 CDT, Jason Heffner wrote: > AppleTV: AppleTV 6.1 software update. You can install this through the updates menu. An active connection to a network. > iPad: iOS 7.1 and an active network connection accessible to the AppleTV to verify connectivity. Bluetooth enabled. > I don’t think that all AppleTV units have Bluetooth. I’m not exactly sure which revs do or don’t offhand unfortunately. -- Julian Y. Koh Acting Associate Director, Telecommunications and Network Services Northwestern University Information Technology (NUIT) 2001 Sheridan Road #G-166 Evanston, IL 60208 847-467-5780 NUIT Web Site: PGP Public Key: ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thanks for the information, everyone.  I have an ipad2 and i don't even know what generation the appletv is (its a loaner from another department).  I'll get my hands on a newer ipad and try again.

Respectfully,

Matthew "Will" Williams
Assistant Director, Networking
Bucknell University
570.577.1491


On Wed Mar 12 2014 15:11:34 CDT, Julian Y Koh wrote: > I don’t think that all AppleTV units have Bluetooth. I’m not exactly sure which revs do or don’t offhand unfortunately. Another thing is that I would imagine that both the iOS device and the AppleTV need to be able to reach each other directly using unicast. So if the AppleTV is behind a NAT device with respect to the iOS device, or if you have somehow blocked unicast traffic between clients on your wireless network, you might be able to do the discovery via Bluetooh but not actually stream any traffic. -- Julian Y. Koh Acting Associate Director, Telecommunications and Network Services Northwestern University Information Technology (NUIT) 2001 Sheridan Road #G-166 Evanston, IL 60208 847-467-5780 NUIT Web Site: PGP Public Key: ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
I’ve found the bluetooth discovery doesn’t work if the iPad can’t see the AppleTV over unicast. It must make a call to check connectivity after getting the bluetooth broadcast.
I can confirm that NAT does throw this for a loop. This morning I tried connecting my iPhone 5S that was behind a NAT device to an AppleTV on the other side. I could see the AppleTV in the AirPlay list, I could select it but then it wouldn't complete the mirroring. It would just default back to the "iPhone" option. I did a packet capture and found that the AppleTV was trying to open up a UDP stream to my iPhone, presumably for audio, and the NAT device was not letting the UDP packet in. Apparently if the UDP stream doesn't get established, the devices will just give up. -dan Dan Brisson Network Engineer University of Vermont (Ph) 802.656.8111 dbrisson@uvm.edu
Thanks.  We don't have any NAT in the way and I can ping the AppleTV from the iPad. 

Respectfully,

Matthew "Will" Williams
Assistant Director, Networking
Bucknell University
570.577.1491


On Wed, Mar 12, 2014 at 4:19 PM, Dan Brisson <dbrisson@uvm.edu> wrote:
I can confirm that NAT does throw this for a loop.  This morning I tried connecting my iPhone 5S that was behind a NAT device to an AppleTV on the other side.  I could see the AppleTV in the AirPlay list, I could select it but then it wouldn't complete the mirroring.  It would just default back to the "iPhone" option.  I did a packet capture and found that the AppleTV was trying to open up a UDP stream to my iPhone, presumably for audio, and the NAT device was not letting the UDP packet in.  Apparently if the UDP stream doesn't get established, the devices will just give up.

-dan


Dan Brisson
Network Engineer
University of Vermont
(Ph) 802.656.8111
dbrisson@uvm.edu


Message from frnkblk@iname.com

Interesting. I wonder if Apple could address that NAT issue by sending the traffic from the opposite direction, essentially punching a hole in the NAT so that bi-directional communication could be established. Frank -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dan Brisson Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 3:20 PM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi I can confirm that NAT does throw this for a loop. This morning I tried connecting my iPhone 5S that was behind a NAT device to an AppleTV on the other side. I could see the AppleTV in the AirPlay list, I could select it but then it wouldn't complete the mirroring. It would just default back to the "iPhone" option. I did a packet capture and found that the AppleTV was trying to open up a UDP stream to my iPhone, presumably for audio, and the NAT device was not letting the UDP packet in. Apparently if the UDP stream doesn't get established, the devices will just give up. -dan Dan Brisson Network Engineer University of Vermont (Ph) 802.656.8111 dbrisson@uvm.edu
Yah, or the router vendors will need to do some fancy inspection to watch for the initial TCP connection that gets made so it knows to let the UDP connection back in. Like for FTP and the other protocols that behave in a similar manner. -dan Dan Brisson Network Engineer University of Vermont (Ph) 802.656.8111 dbrisson@uvm.edu
Isn't that exactly the way this is supposed to happen? Apple creates something that doesn't work well, and all the other vendors burn up a bunch of development hours that could have been spent fixing bugs and controlling code quality, contriving workarounds to make the Apple device work. Pete Morrissey -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dan Brisson Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 8:51 PM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi Yah, or the router vendors will need to do some fancy inspection to watch for the initial TCP connection that gets made so it knows to let the UDP connection back in. Like for FTP and the other protocols that behave in a similar manner. -dan Dan Brisson Network Engineer University of Vermont (Ph) 802.656.8111 dbrisson@uvm.edu
Message from frnkblk@iname.com

One thing about application adoption is that you don't want to have to force the network to change if you want mass adoption. Better to design the application around the existing network paradigms. Frank -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dan Brisson Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 7:51 PM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi Yah, or the router vendors will need to do some fancy inspection to watch for the initial TCP connection that gets made so it knows to let the UDP connection back in. Like for FTP and the other protocols that behave in a similar manner. -dan Dan Brisson Network Engineer University of Vermont (Ph) 802.656.8111 dbrisson@uvm.edu
Unless your name is Apple. :) I do agree with you, though. -dan Dan Brisson Network Engineer University of Vermont (Ph) 802.656.8111 dbrisson@uvm.edu
Apple is not innocent, but let's not forget that those AppleTVs and other Bonjour enabled devices were really intended for home usage initially. The fact that faculty use it in the classroom or students use it in the dormitories is a side effect of its success. NetBEUI and IPX were killing our networks and they claimed to be for the enterprise! (sorry I had to bring those monsters out of the closet) Philippe Philippe Hanset www.eduroam.us On Mar 12, 2014, at 9:58 PM, Frank Bulk wrote: > One thing about application adoption is that you don't want to have to force > the network to change if you want mass adoption. Better to design the > application around the existing network paradigms. > > Frank > > -----Original Message----- > From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv > [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dan Brisson > Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 7:51 PM > To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU > Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD > wifi > > Yah, or the router vendors will need to do some fancy inspection to > watch for the initial TCP connection that gets made so it knows to let > the UDP connection back in. Like for FTP and the other protocols that > behave in a similar manner. > > -dan > > > Dan Brisson > Network Engineer > University of Vermont > (Ph) 802.656.8111 > dbrisson@uvm.edu > >
Agree Philippe, but I guess those iDevices are here to stay. Let's just hope that something comes out of IETF DNSsd http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/dnssd/charter/ IPX? You're such a "Novel(l)" person mr Hanset. :) Cheers Anders -----Ursprungligt meddelande----- Från: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] För Hanset, Philippe C Skickat: den 13 mars 2014 03:21 Till: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Ämne: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi Apple is not innocent, but let's not forget that those AppleTVs and other Bonjour enabled devices were really intended for home usage initially. The fact that faculty use it in the classroom or students use it in the dormitories is a side effect of its success. NetBEUI and IPX were killing our networks and they claimed to be for the enterprise! (sorry I had to bring those monsters out of the closet) Philippe Philippe Hanset www.eduroam.us On Mar 12, 2014, at 9:58 PM, Frank Bulk wrote: > One thing about application adoption is that you don't want to have to > force the network to change if you want mass adoption. Better to > design the application around the existing network paradigms. > > Frank > > -----Original Message----- > From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv > [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dan Brisson > Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 7:51 PM > To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU > Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in > HD wifi > > Yah, or the router vendors will need to do some fancy inspection to > watch for the initial TCP connection that gets made so it knows to let > the UDP connection back in. Like for FTP and the other protocols that > behave in a similar manner. > > -dan > > > Dan Brisson > Network Engineer > University of Vermont > (Ph) 802.656.8111 > dbrisson@uvm.edu > >
I would agree, except for the fact that Apple chose to promote these devices in their ads to be used in conference rooms. -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Hanset, Philippe C Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 10:21 PM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi Apple is not innocent, but let's not forget that those AppleTVs and other Bonjour enabled devices were really intended for home usage initially. The fact that faculty use it in the classroom or students use it in the dormitories is a side effect of its success. NetBEUI and IPX were killing our networks and they claimed to be for the enterprise! (sorry I had to bring those monsters out of the closet) Philippe Philippe Hanset www.eduroam.us On Mar 12, 2014, at 9:58 PM, Frank Bulk wrote: > One thing about application adoption is that you don't want to have to > force the network to change if you want mass adoption. Better to > design the application around the existing network paradigms. > > Frank > > -----Original Message----- > From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv > [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dan Brisson > Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 7:51 PM > To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU > Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in > HD wifi > > Yah, or the router vendors will need to do some fancy inspection to > watch for the initial TCP connection that gets made so it knows to let > the UDP connection back in. Like for FTP and the other protocols that > behave in a similar manner. > > -dan > > > Dan Brisson > Network Engineer > University of Vermont > (Ph) 802.656.8111 > dbrisson@uvm.edu > >
Message from neil-johnson@uiowa.edu



There has been an update to an article that explains devices must support Bluetooth 4.0.

That means you must have a 3rd gen Apple TV and later generations of iPads and iPhones.\

I don't have a 3rd gen ATV to test in our lab, so I'm waiting on someone else to verity.



-Neil



On Mar 13, 2014, at 8:52 AM, Peter P Morrissey <ppmorris@SYR.EDU> wrote:

I would agree, except for the fact that Apple chose to promote these devices in their ads to be used in conference rooms.

-----Original Message-----
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Hanset, Philippe C
Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 10:21 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

Apple is not innocent,  but let's not forget that those AppleTVs and other Bonjour enabled devices were really intended for home usage initially.

The fact that faculty use it in the classroom or students use it in the dormitories is a side effect of its success.

NetBEUI and IPX were killing our networks and they claimed to be for the enterprise!
(sorry I had to bring those monsters out of the closet)

Philippe

Philippe Hanset
www.eduroam.us




On Mar 12, 2014, at 9:58 PM, Frank Bulk <frnkblk@iname.com> wrote:

One thing about application adoption is that you don't want to have to
force the network to change if you want mass adoption. Better to
design the application around the existing network paradigms.

Frank

-----Original Message-----
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv
[mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dan Brisson
Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 7:51 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in
HD wifi

Yah, or the router vendors will need to do some fancy inspection to
watch for the initial TCP connection that gets made so it knows to let
the UDP connection back in. Like for FTP and the other protocols that
behave in a similar manner.

-dan


Dan Brisson
Network Engineer
University of Vermont
(Ph) 802.656.8111
dbrisson@uvm.edu

Damn!! I need to upgrade to a newer iPad  my iPad2 won’t cut it. L

 

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/apple

 

 

Cheers

Anders

 

 

 

Från: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] För Johnson, Neil M
Skickat: den 13 mars 2014 18:01
Till: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Ämne: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

 

 

 

There has been an update to an article that explains devices must support Bluetooth 4.0.

 

That means you must have a 3rd gen Apple TV and later generations of iPads and iPhones.\

 

I don't have a 3rd gen ATV to test in our lab, so I'm waiting on someone else to verity.

 

 

 

-Neil

 

 

 

On Mar 13, 2014, at 8:52 AM, Peter P Morrissey <ppmorris@SYR.EDU> wrote:



I would agree, except for the fact that Apple chose to promote these devices in their ads to be used in conference rooms.

-----Original Message-----
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Hanset, Philippe C
Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 10:21 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

Apple is not innocent,  but let's not forget that those AppleTVs and other Bonjour enabled devices were really intended for home usage initially.

The fact that faculty use it in the classroom or students use it in the dormitories is a side effect of its success.

NetBEUI and IPX were killing our networks and they claimed to be for the enterprise!
(sorry I had to bring those monsters out of the closet)

Philippe

Philippe Hanset
www.eduroam.us




On Mar 12, 2014, at 9:58 PM, Frank Bulk <frnkblk@iname.com> wrote:


One thing about application adoption is that you don't want to have to
force the network to change if you want mass adoption. Better to
design the application around the existing network paradigms.

Frank

-----Original Message-----
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv
[mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dan Brisson
Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 7:51 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in
HD wifi

Yah, or the router vendors will need to do some fancy inspection to
watch for the initial TCP connection that gets made so it knows to let
the UDP connection back in. Like for FTP and the other protocols that
behave in a similar manner.

-dan


Dan Brisson
Network Engineer
University of Vermont
(Ph) 802.656.8111
dbrisson@uvm.edu

Hi Neil,

One of our Apple-minded staff has it working well.

Lee

Sent from my Android phone using TouchDown (www.nitrodesk.com)

-----Original Message-----
From: Johnson, Neil M [neil-johnson@UIOWA.EDU]
Received: Thursday, 13 Mar 2014, 13:01
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU]
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi



There has been an update to an article that explains devices must support Bluetooth 4.0.

That means you must have a 3rd gen Apple TV and later generations of iPads and iPhones.\

I don't have a 3rd gen ATV to test in our lab, so I'm waiting on someone else to verity.



-Neil



On Mar 13, 2014, at 8:52 AM, Peter P Morrissey <ppmorris@SYR.EDU> wrote:

I would agree, except for the fact that Apple chose to promote these devices in their ads to be used in conference rooms.

-----Original Message-----
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Hanset, Philippe C
Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 10:21 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

Apple is not innocent,  but let's not forget that those AppleTVs and other Bonjour enabled devices were really intended for home usage initially.

The fact that faculty use it in the classroom or students use it in the dormitories is a side effect of its success.

NetBEUI and IPX were killing our networks and they claimed to be for the enterprise!
(sorry I had to bring those monsters out of the closet)

Philippe

Philippe Hanset
www.eduroam.us




On Mar 12, 2014, at 9:58 PM, Frank Bulk <frnkblk@iname.com> wrote:

One thing about application adoption is that you don't want to have to
force the network to change if you want mass adoption. Better to
design the application around the existing network paradigms.

Frank

-----Original Message-----
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv
[mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dan Brisson
Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 7:51 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in
HD wifi

Yah, or the router vendors will need to do some fancy inspection to
watch for the initial TCP connection that gets made so it knows to let
the UDP connection back in. Like for FTP and the other protocols that
behave in a similar manner.

-dan


Dan Brisson
Network Engineer
University of Vermont
(Ph) 802.656.8111
dbrisson@uvm.edu

Of the folks who are allowing users to do bonjour services over wifi. Either thru native multicast , or the enhancements from the various wifi vendors. Has anyone noticed spectrum issues in dense classrooms? I have a department who is proposing 12 screens with 12 apple tvs in room with 180 seats and I'm can't see how this can work given the crowded spectrum in large seat rooms. Has anyone tried multiple apple tvs in the same room with multiple users mirroring different content simultaneously ? Sent from my iPhone ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Message from jcoehoorn@york.edu

I think most of all, they wouldn't like the results even if the wireless worked. I imagine instructors will at some point expect to be able to mirror a single device to all twelve screens at once, so they all show the same thing, and I don't believe that Apple's AirPlay will work that way. It's my understanding that if they have 12 Apple TVs, they'll need to be running 12 separate iPads/iPhones/Macs to take advantage of those screens. If that's what they want to do, that's one thing... but somehow I don't see it being used that way. It seems much more likely that what they really want is one AppleTV connected to a redistributor that will show a single instructor's iPad across all 12 screen with only one connection, or if you have a good enough controller system, just those screens that the instructor selects.

Now, about the wireless actually working... hahahaha, how cute. What you could do is run a network drop for each AppleTV, and make sure the wired network drop gets an address from your wireless range, or is exposed to your wireless range via a bonjour gateway. That would at least take a lot of the traffic out of the rf space.



Joel Coehoorn
Director of Information Technology
York College, Nebraska
402.363.5603
jcoehoorn@york.edu

 

The mission of York College is to transform lives through Christ-centered education and to equip students for lifelong service to God, family, and society



Yes that’s definitely the plan to wire the apple tvs.  The way they envision this is having 12 displays and have students break out into smaller study/collaboration groups on the fly, with modular furniture that they can move to accomadate.  So it wouldn’t be an individual instructor controlling all 12.  It could be anyone of the 180 users in the class all of which either have ipad or iphone or both.

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Coehoorn, Joel
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 12:27 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

 

I think most of all, they wouldn't like the results even if the wireless worked. I imagine instructors will at some point expect to be able to mirror a single device to all twelve screens at once, so they all show the same thing, and I don't believe that Apple's AirPlay will work that way. It's my understanding that if they have 12 Apple TVs, they'll need to be running 12 separate iPads/iPhones/Macs to take advantage of those screens. If that's what they want to do, that's one thing... but somehow I don't see it being used that way. It seems much more likely that what they really want is one AppleTV connected to a redistributor that will show a single instructor's iPad across all 12 screen with only one connection, or if you have a good enough controller system, just those screens that the instructor selects.

 

Now, about the wireless actually working... hahahaha, how cute. What you could do is run a network drop for each AppleTV, and make sure the wired network drop gets an address from your wireless range, or is exposed to your wireless range via a bonjour gateway. That would at least take a lot of the traffic out of the rf space.

 


 

Joel Coehoorn
Director of Information Technology
York College, Nebraska
402.363.5603
jcoehoorn@york.edu

 

The mission of York College is to transform lives through Christ-centered education and to equip students for lifelong service to God, family, and society

 

We aren’t doing anything to that density but are implementing something somewhat similar right now.  Would certainly be interested to see hear how you go.

 

We are doing 3 rooms with these as a bit of a pilot http://www.mersive.com/products/solstice/

It’s basically software that runs on Windows and allows multiple users and device types to connect and share content. Our most dense room will be 60 users with 8 of these boxes, 2 fixed on wired network and 6 trolleys running wireless. Designed to be flexible small group learning spaces.

 

Lee,

I notice you’re looking at Mersive as well, how are you setting yours up?

 

--

Jason Cook

The University of Adelaide, AUSTRALIA 5005

Ph    : +61 8 8313 4800

e-mail: jason.cook@adelaide.edu.au<mailto:jason.cook@adelaide.edu.au>

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Hurt,Trenton W.
Sent: Thursday, 16 January 2014 4:02 AM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

 

Yes that’s definitely the plan to wire the apple tvs.  The way they envision this is having 12 displays and have students break out into smaller study/collaboration groups on the fly, with modular furniture that they can move to accomadate.  So it wouldn’t be an individual instructor controlling all 12.  It could be anyone of the 180 users in the class all of which either have ipad or iphone or both.

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Coehoorn, Joel
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 12:27 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

 

I think most of all, they wouldn't like the results even if the wireless worked. I imagine instructors will at some point expect to be able to mirror a single device to all twelve screens at once, so they all show the same thing, and I don't believe that Apple's AirPlay will work that way. It's my understanding that if they have 12 Apple TVs, they'll need to be running 12 separate iPads/iPhones/Macs to take advantage of those screens. If that's what they want to do, that's one thing... but somehow I don't see it being used that way. It seems much more likely that what they really want is one AppleTV connected to a redistributor that will show a single instructor's iPad across all 12 screen with only one connection, or if you have a good enough controller system, just those screens that the instructor selects.

 

Now, about the wireless actually working... hahahaha, how cute. What you could do is run a network drop for each AppleTV, and make sure the wired network drop gets an address from your wireless range, or is exposed to your wireless range via a bonjour gateway. That would at least take a lot of the traffic out of the rf space.

 


 

Joel Coehoorn
Director of Information Technology
York College, Nebraska
402.363.5603
jcoehoorn@york.edu

 

The mission of York College is to transform lives through Christ-centered education and to equip students for lifelong service to God, family, and society

 

Our initial idea is for Solstice on our teaching station PCs, generally one per room (hundreds of them). Then there will likely be other creative uses to be discovered. Works elegantly on LAN/WLAN with nothing unique required of the network, so you can envision all sorts of collaboration configs.

Lee Badman
Network Architect/Wireless TME
ITS, Syracuse University
315.443.3003

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason Cook [jason.cook@ADELAIDE.EDU.AU]
Received: Wednesday, 15 Jan 2014, 17:50
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU]
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

We aren’t doing anything to that density but are implementing something somewhat similar right now.  Would certainly be interested to see hear how you go.

 

We are doing 3 rooms with these as a bit of a pilot http://www.mersive.com/products/solstice/

It’s basically software that runs on Windows and allows multiple users and device types to connect and share content. Our most dense room will be 60 users with 8 of these boxes, 2 fixed on wired network and 6 trolleys running wireless. Designed to be flexible small group learning spaces.

 

Lee,

I notice you’re looking at Mersive as well, how are you setting yours up?

 

--

Jason Cook

The University of Adelaide, AUSTRALIA 5005

Ph    : +61 8 8313 4800

e-mail: jason.cook@adelaide.edu.au<mailto:jason.cook@adelaide.edu.au>

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Hurt,Trenton W.
Sent: Thursday, 16 January 2014 4:02 AM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

 

Yes that’s definitely the plan to wire the apple tvs.  The way they envision this is having 12 displays and have students break out into smaller study/collaboration groups on the fly, with modular furniture that they can move to accomadate.  So it wouldn’t be an individual instructor controlling all 12.  It could be anyone of the 180 users in the class all of which either have ipad or iphone or both.

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Coehoorn, Joel
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 12:27 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

 

I think most of all, they wouldn't like the results even if the wireless worked. I imagine instructors will at some point expect to be able to mirror a single device to all twelve screens at once, so they all show the same thing, and I don't believe that Apple's AirPlay will work that way. It's my understanding that if they have 12 Apple TVs, they'll need to be running 12 separate iPads/iPhones/Macs to take advantage of those screens. If that's what they want to do, that's one thing... but somehow I don't see it being used that way. It seems much more likely that what they really want is one AppleTV connected to a redistributor that will show a single instructor's iPad across all 12 screen with only one connection, or if you have a good enough controller system, just those screens that the instructor selects.

 

Now, about the wireless actually working... hahahaha, how cute. What you could do is run a network drop for each AppleTV, and make sure the wired network drop gets an address from your wireless range, or is exposed to your wireless range via a bonjour gateway. That would at least take a lot of the traffic out of the rf space.

 


 

Joel Coehoorn
Director of Information Technology
York College, Nebraska
402.363.5603
jcoehoorn@york.edu

 

The mission of York College is to transform lives through Christ-centered education and to equip students for lifelong service to God, family, and society

 

Sounds like a much bigger implementation plan than ours J

 

I feel we may end up on that kind of path, but to begin with it will just be a smaller pilot….. and see where it goes from there

 

I do like no effort in the network apart from ensuring ample bandwidth.

 

--

Jason Cook

The University of Adelaide, AUSTRALIA 5005

Ph    : +61 8 8313 4800

e-mail: jason.cook@adelaide.edu.au<mailto:jason.cook@adelaide.edu.au>

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Lee H Badman
Sent: Thursday, 16 January 2014 9:34 AM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

 

Our initial idea is for Solstice on our teaching station PCs, generally one per room (hundreds of them). Then there will likely be other creative uses to be discovered. Works elegantly on LAN/WLAN with nothing unique required of the network, so you can envision all sorts of collaboration configs.

Lee Badman
Network Architect/Wireless TME
ITS, Syracuse University
315.443.3003

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason Cook [jason.cook@ADELAIDE.EDU.AU]
Received: Wednesday, 15 Jan 2014, 17:50
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU]
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

We aren’t doing anything to that density but are implementing something somewhat similar right now.  Would certainly be interested to see hear how you go.

 

We are doing 3 rooms with these as a bit of a pilot http://www.mersive.com/products/solstice/

It’s basically software that runs on Windows and allows multiple users and device types to connect and share content. Our most dense room will be 60 users with 8 of these boxes, 2 fixed on wired network and 6 trolleys running wireless. Designed to be flexible small group learning spaces.

 

Lee,

I notice you’re looking at Mersive as well, how are you setting yours up?

 

--

Jason Cook

The University of Adelaide, AUSTRALIA 5005

Ph    : +61 8 8313 4800

e-mail: jason.cook@adelaide.edu.au<mailto:jason.cook@adelaide.edu.au>

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Hurt,Trenton W.
Sent: Thursday, 16 January 2014 4:02 AM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

 

Yes that’s definitely the plan to wire the apple tvs.  The way they envision this is having 12 displays and have students break out into smaller study/collaboration groups on the fly, with modular furniture that they can move to accomadate.  So it wouldn’t be an individual instructor controlling all 12.  It could be anyone of the 180 users in the class all of which either have ipad or iphone or both.

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Coehoorn, Joel
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 12:27 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple TV display mirroring spectrum use in HD wifi

 

I think most of all, they wouldn't like the results even if the wireless worked. I imagine instructors will at some point expect to be able to mirror a single device to all twelve screens at once, so they all show the same thing, and I don't believe that Apple's AirPlay will work that way. It's my understanding that if they have 12 Apple TVs, they'll need to be running 12 separate iPads/iPhones/Macs to take advantage of those screens. If that's what they want to do, that's one thing... but somehow I don't see it being used that way. It seems much more likely that what they really want is one AppleTV connected to a redistributor that will show a single instructor's iPad across all 12 screen with only one connection, or if you have a good enough controller system, just those screens that the instructor selects.

 

Now, about the wireless actually working... hahahaha, how cute. What you could do is run a network drop for each AppleTV, and make sure the wired network drop gets an address from your wireless range, or is exposed to your wireless range via a bonjour gateway. That would at least take a lot of the traffic out of the rf space.

 


 

Joel Coehoorn
Director of Information Technology
York College, Nebraska
402.363.5603
jcoehoorn@york.edu

 

The mission of York College is to transform lives through Christ-centered education and to equip students for lifelong service to God, family, and society

 

you might take a look at this white paper from Cisco. http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/wireless/ps5678/ps10981/desig... I've just been reading it and it contains some useful information, RE: reducing cell sizes by turning off some of the lower data rates, the use of directional antennas to limit cell size, and all kinds of other tricks. Hope this helps. >>> On 1/15/2014 at 08:37 AM, "Hurt,Trenton W." wrote: > Of the folks who are allowing users to do bonjour services over wifi. Either > thru native multicast , or the enhancements from the various wifi vendors. > Has anyone noticed spectrum issues in dense classrooms? I have a department > who is proposing 12 screens with 12 apple tvs in room with 180 seats and I'm > can't see how this can work given the crowded spectrum in large seat rooms. > Has anyone tried multiple apple tvs in the same room with multiple users > mirroring different content simultaneously ? > > Sent from my iPhone > ********** > Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent > Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. > ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
I give Cisco and Aerohive, etc. great credit for building in techniques that might help solve Apple's problems, but also not buying in to making the network jump through hoops for one device and client type.

To allow for display mirroring (and a lot more functionality) for ALL device types we are strongly leaning towards Mersive's Soltice software. It requires zero network reconfiguration, no multicast, and just fits like a glove. We are negotiating on $$ with Mersive after successful demos.

Lee Badman
Network Architect/Wireless TME
ITS, Syracuse University
315.443.3003

Hi Lee,
On 1/15/2014 10:57 PM, James Andrewartha wrote: > Hi Lee, > >
Hi James, Not sure what you're looking at, but AppleTV has nothing to do with Mersive. I'm not trying to sell their stuff, just quite fond of it after the frustrations of what the network needs to have done to it (bigger networks are worse) for AppleTV. I see TCO of AppleTV as $99 (for AppleTV) + lots of hours dorking with the network + lots of support issues when it becomes a service so relied on that it simply can't tolerate almost-guaranteed disruption/unpredictability + time spent trying to accommodate non-Apple devices = AppleTV actually costs hundreds (or thousands) of dollars and leaves you with a network you'd probably prefer not to have, and a fragmented "what device can do what" environment for diplay mirroring. I like the Mersive paradigm as an alternative- it asks nothing of the network. Although I'd still like to see Apple fix their own limitations. -Lee Lee H. Badman Network Architect/Wireless TME ITS, Syracuse University 315.443.3003 ________________________________________
Hi Lee,
Hi James, You are right it doesn't do mirroring as such for IOS. The mersive guys are pretty helpful, if you are interested it would be worth having a chat with them anyway, they might be pushing for such a feature in the future. As you say ultimately it's about choosing something that fits your requirements, IOS mirroring wasn't on our list as required but certainly nice to have... I'm sure it's only a matter of time until the requests pour in. I believe we are also looking at a couple of AB tutor licenses, don't know if this has anything of use https://abtutor.com/ios_features Regards Jason -- Jason Cook The University of Adelaide, AUSTRALIA 5005 Ph : +61 8 8313 4800 e-mail: jason.cook@adelaide.edu.au
Message from jcoehoorn@york.edu

I've been **very** happy using AirServer (www.airserverapp.com) instead of AppleTVs for mirroring. The software installs to a PC or Mac, and allows the computer to act as an AppleTV. It even supports multiple-simultaneous connections and recording(!) - (recording is currently Mac only, coming soon for PC). What connected classroom doesn't already have a PC or Mac where you could just install this program? And it's only $4 per classroom. That's not a typo.

The downside is that this does make demands on your network... namely, that your classroom PCs be on the same subnet as your wireless devices, or that you complete the same kind of mDNS gateway setup for the classroom computer that you would have needed to do for an AppleTV. 

I know this sounds a bit like an advertisement, but I'm just a *very* happy customer. We started a pilot with 12 real AppleTVs in the summer/early fall of 2012, and within a few weeks of discovering this we had ripped all of the AppleTVs out and deployed this campus-wide, for less than the smaller pilot program cost.

The software can be set to run all the time, or start on demand, though either way the user must be logged into a PC before it will accept a stream. I've found it works best when started on demand... this cuts down on the number of classrooms that show available for mirroring from the iPad, making it easier to find what you're looking for, and it also solves the issue of a random student or passerby interrupting a lecture already using the computer by kicking off a stream. Also, there was a bug for the PC version back in 2012 (since fixed) with running as a service, so that's just part of the deployment we have now.




Joel Coehoorn
Director of Information Technology
York College, Nebraska
402.363.5603
jcoehoorn@york.edu

 

The mission of York College is to transform lives through Christ-centered education and to equip students for lifelong service to God, family, and society



James, You said, Sure, I wish you could drop Apple TVs into a directory like printers (though AirPrint indicates that's going away too) and just choose from a list. I believe Aruba Networks' AirGroup feature can do exactly what you want, letting users choose from devices they are close to. You ca nalso limit what users have access to devices, so Students may not be able to display on classroom monitors, for example. See http://www.arubanetworks.com/pdf/technology/TB_AirGroupWLANServices.pdf for more information. Bruce Osborne Network Engineer - Wireless Team IT Network Services (434) 592-4229 LIBERTY UNIVERSITY Training Champions for Christ since 1971
Hi Bruce,

Yes, ClearPass and AirGroup allows a user to define up to 10 other users that can "see" their personal device.

 

 

 

Tim Cappalli  |  ACCP /  ACMP /  CCNA

Network Engineer  |  Brandeis University

cappalli@brandeis.edu | (617) 701-7149

 

Close
Close


Annual Conference
September 29–October 2
Register Now!

Events for all Levels and Interests

Whether you're looking for a conference to attend face-to-face to connect with peers, or for an online event for team professional development, see what's upcoming.

Close

Digital Badges
Member recognition effort
Earn yours >

Career Center


Leadership and Management Programs

EDUCAUSE Institute
Project Management

 

 

Jump Start Your Career Growth

Explore EDUCAUSE professional development opportunities that match your career aspirations and desired level of time investment through our interactive online guide.

 

Close
EDUCAUSE organizes its efforts around three IT Focus Areas

 

 

Join These Programs If Your Focus Is

Close

Get on the Higher Ed IT Map

Employees of EDUCAUSE member institutions and organizations are invited to create individual profiles.
 

 

Close

2014 Strategic Priorities

  • Building the Profession
  • IT as a Game Changer
  • Foundations


Learn More >

Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good™

EDUCAUSE is the foremost community of higher education IT leaders and professionals.