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Message from brian.david@bc.edu

All,

I wanted to get peoples perspective on their PTP wireless deployment.

How reliable is it for you. How much does the weather affect it?

How much through put are you getting and in what frequency are you using?

We are looking to have a temporary deployment for a particular building that is less than

a mile away and has excellent line of sight.

Any input would be great.

Thank you in advance.

 

Brian J David

Network Systems Engineer

Boston College

 

 

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Comments

Brian


If you plan to use 802.11 technology, I would recommend the following:

1.       Assume you will be in the 5.8 Ghz band – 2.4 is too crowded and severely affected by anything with water molecules (trees, leaves, fog, rain, etc).

2.       Get on the roofs of each building with a WiFi tester (anything that can tell you what channels it sees – free apps are available on smartphones) to see if you have any clear channels (you probably do).

3.       Select very directional antenna for each site to minimize outside interference.  A grid antenna like these will get you a good connection:  http://www.terra-wave.com/shop/5-ghz-antennas-5-ghz-parabolic-dish-grid-antennas-c-33_62_67.html

Note: these antennae are NOT MIMO and will connect to only ONE antenna port on your AP.  You will need to disable the remaining ports.

 

Finally, recognize that you will be limited to 802.11 throughput which could become a bottleneck if you have a lot of users at the remote site.

 

Hope that helps

 

Ron Walczak    PMP, RCDD, CWNA/CWSP
Walczak Technology Consultants, Inc
(724) 865-2740

"Not to speak is to speak.  Not to act is to act." -  Dietrich Bonhoeffer 

"The great aim of education is not knowledge but action." - Herbert Spencer

Anyone can count the seeds in an apple; 
but only God can count the apples in a seed


We use Ubiquity Bullets for PTP stuff.  They do single-stream N (about 80 Mbps real life).  We buy antennas, lightning protectors, and coax cables from L-Com.

If you use Bullets, don't buy the Ubiquiti power supplies.  Use the TP-POE-18 from Tycon Power Systems (here is one site that has them:  http://www.streakwave.com/Itemdesc.asp?ic=TP-POE-18)
The Ubuiqiti power supplies are junk and won't last very long.  I use the 18 V unit from Tycon because the max voltage for the bullets is 24V and they are very finicky about it being no more than 24V.

I would use a 5 Ghz channel.  I have a couple running 2.4, but 5 Ghz has more options so you don't interfere with the 2.4 wireless inside the building for the clients.

These setups have been very reliable.

Nathan


We use Ruckus PTP on occasion and have found the deployment simple and reliable. Our distances were approx. 900 meters and bandwidth was at 100+ throughput. The antennas use 5GHz. and are normally sold in pairs.

The reliability and tenacity to hold a signal was illustrated when a receiving antenna was blown off the roof while still connected (a temp. setup for a couple of weeks) to it's ethernet cable. We didn't realize anything was amiss until Facilities called to inform us of the incident. The antenna was facing away from it's partner and was still getting a strong signal. The distance on this incident was about 800 yards and the building did not realize the issue since they were getting the network at normal speeds.

Here's the specs from Ruckus:

Wire-like, long range throughput

  • Integration, dual-polarized directional smart antenna
  • 802.11n, operating in the 5GHz band
  • Up to 190 Mbps at 1.5 km/1 mi
  • Up to 165 Mbps at 3 km/2 mi
  • Up to 100 Mbps at 5 km/3 mi
  • Up to 50 Mbps at 10 km/6 mi
  • 15km maximum range

Easy installation and pairing

  • No external antennas
  • Lightweight design (877 grams / 1.93 lbs.)
  • Flexible mounting options
  • Finds peer automatically

Secure and scalable

  • AES-based, the wireless bridge link is secure and can scale to support multiple networks segmented by VLANs

Robust operation

  • IP-65 rated
  • Operates in conditions from -40°C – 65° C (-40°F – 149°F)
  • 802.3af power over Ethernet support
  • Internal 14dBi directional antenna

Ultra simple positioning and aiming

  • Liberal 30-degree, 3dB beam width antenna
  • Sophisticated LED-based aiming software

Harry Rauch Sr. Network Analyst Eckerd College 4200 - 54th Ave S St. Petersburg, FL 33711

Brian,

We haven't done a point to point with 802.11n yet but our considerations, before 802.11n, were the following:

-We usually prefer a complete embedded solution (AP+Antennas in one enclosure) rather than an outdoor AP with connected antennas
 (e.g. Proxim used to do that with their Tsunami products, we have a QuickBridge 60 that has been up for 8 years without a glitch). Connectors tend to corrode (you can put all the tar-tape you want around an N-Type connector, eventually it will take moisture ;-). Embedded solution only have one Cat5 or cat6 with rugged connectors (O-ring and screw-on adapter). 
Especially with 802.11n, I would imagine that an embedded would be easier to handle than
an outdoor AP with at least 2 antennas, if not 3!

-Beware of the Fresnel Zone and position your AP high enough. Line of Sight is not enough in some cases.

-Consider Management... If you use one vendor, you might want to stick to their solution (assuming that they
 have a decent p-t-p offering). The QB60 that I'm mentioning above requires a dedicated Java client that only runs on a Windows PC... that didn't age too well and only one or two people in our group still remember how that
thing works. 

Best,

Philippe Hanset
Univ. of TN, Knoxville

We’ve had great luck with the Exalt r5005- total of 160 Mbps that you can shape (100 down/60 up, 80/80,  120/40)- rock solid and reliable in 5 Ghz. Easy to align as well.

 

We have a number of high-end and crazy cheap bridges in use, and right now Exalt is the reigning champ here for value. We are getting ready to go down the Gig bridge road for the first time, but none of our current bridges (even the lowly 11gs) are anywhere near saturation.

 

-Lee

 

Lee H. Badman

Wireless/Network Engineer

Information Technology and Services

Adjunct Instructor, iSchool

Syracuse University

315 443-3003

 

 

We have used a Bridgewave PTP for a few years and it has performed very well.

 

http://www.bridgewave.com/products/ge60.cfm

 

Bruce Entwistle

Network Manager

University of Redlands

 

 

Message from ssmith@siu.edu

I've used a wide range of PTP solutions over the past 15yrs, but most recently we have a microwave (FCC licensed link) between our campus and our Airport, which is about 6 miles as the crow flies.  This link is a Trango 11/18GHz link, and 315Mbps-full duplex.  Rain, ice, snow, really don't bother this link much.  The only issue weather related we had was wind, as it would turn the dish.  We finally fixed that and it's been completely reliable since.  I should add we have direct line of sight and no trees even remotely close to the fresnel zone.

Recently we had a project pending with a Motorola PTP 600, I believe, and it's throughput was about the same and the price point was really attractive.

I've also looked at other solutions in the past, but these are the most recent ones I'm most familiar with.

Entwistle, Bruce wrote:

We have used a Bridgewave PTP for a few years and it has performed very well.

 

http://www.bridgewave.com/products/ge60.cfm

 

Bruce Entwistle

Network Manager

University of Redlands

 

 

Message from frnkblk@iname.com

We use Alvarion B-14’s for our broadband wireless network and Exalt for TDM backhaul on our cellular network.  They’ve both been working well for us.

 

Frank

 

Message from donald_wright@brown.edu

Brian,
    I know you're an Aruba shop as we are, and we've had success with a pair of AP-175's in a half mile line of sight link.  Rock solid. even passed voip over it.  What I didn't like was that it's setup as an outdoor mesh and needs a controller.  I'll be testing a pair MST-100 (formerly Azalea, now Aruba) bridges later this summer.  These are standalone units and don't need a controller.  I'll let you know how this works out the next time we talk. 
-
Don Wright
Brown University

Please consider the environment before printing this email.

`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸.·´¯`·...¸ ><((((º>`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸.·´¯`·...¸><((((º>



Don,
 
I am interested in knowing what model of antennas you are using for the Aruba line of sight link?
 
Thanks a million,
 


 
 
John V. Duran
Network Engineer
University of New Mexico
Information Technologies
Ph: (505) 249-7890
Fax: (505) 277-8101
>>> "Wright, Don" <donald_wright@BROWN.EDU> 7/8/2012 5:03 PM >>>
Brian,
I know you're an Aruba shop as we are, and we've had success with a pair of AP-175's in a half mile line of sight link. Rock solid. even passed voip over it. What I didn't like was that it's setup as an outdoor mesh and needs a controller. I'll be testing a pair MST-100 (formerly Azalea, now Aruba) bridges later this summer. These are standalone units and don't need a controller. I'll let you know how this works out the next time we talk.
-
Don Wright
Brown University

Please consider the environment before printing this email.

`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸.·´¯`·...¸ ><((((º>`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸.·´¯`·...¸><((((º>



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