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Message from tmh9@msstate.edu

This has been discussed in the past, but it has been a long time. We're at the point that we have to turn off the lower connection rates on our campus. I'm curious what other schools have done and the positive/negative results from the changes. We have disabled 1, 2, 5.5, and 11 Mbps in some of our buildings with great success, but some might argue to just eliminate 1 & 2 Mbps rates. Also, I'd be interested to hear from schools that have not disabled these rates and why not. -- Todd M. Hall Sr. Network Analyst Information Technology Services Mississippi State University tmh9@msstate.edu ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

We have axed 1, 2, and 5.5. But... in one case had to locally re-enable for retail bar scanners, in another for ticket scanners, and just this week dealing with Vernier Labquest2 scientific probes that will only work if lowest rates are on. Lee H. Badman Network Architect/Wireless TME Information Technology and Services (ITS) Syracuse University 315 443-3003    
We too were thinking of disabling the B rates. But I read (post below) that some people run into Apple devices dropping connection when they did this so I am still looking at this. Post: If you're using Cisco one thing to check is that the MCS0 data rate is enabled. I had a lot of problems with Macs and iThings dropping after I disabled the 802.11b rates and MCS0. Per TAC's suggestion I re-enabled the MCS0 rate and have not been experiencing the problems since. Apparently it has to do with the OS dropping the data rate to MCS0 to save power, but not checking if that rate is supported before doing it. Randy Ethridge Network Engineer V Information Services Eastern Illinois University rlethridge@eiu.edu Office Ph. 217-581-7640 Proud to say "I am EIU" EIU THINKS GREEN: Before printing this e-mail think if it is necessary
Hi Todd, Disabling 802.11b is not an option but a must nowadays. You get much better overall performance with all data traffic over OFDM. There's a lot of time (Airtime)that gets lot if you allow old legacy protocols. We have had 802.11b off for over a year and nobody complains. Cheers Anders Nilsson -----Ursprungligt meddelande----- Från: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] För Todd M. Hall Skickat: den 27 september 2012 14:55 Till: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Ämne: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds This has been discussed in the past, but it has been a long time. We're at the point that we have to turn off the lower connection rates on our campus. I'm curious what other schools have done and the positive/negative results from the changes. We have disabled 1, 2, 5.5, and 11 Mbps in some of our buildings with great success, but some might argue to just eliminate 1 & 2 Mbps rates. Also, I'd be interested to hear from schools that have not disabled these rates and why not. -- Todd M. Hall Sr. Network Analyst Information Technology Services Mississippi State University tmh9@msstate.edu ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
We've eliminated all the b rates on our wireless with no significant issues. We had lots of connections to our wireless at 802.11b rates, but it was users out of range from the APs, or clients with outdated drivers - both problems which were easily corrected. Our wireless is entirely 1X, so consumer devices like TVs and game consoles, some of which I've heard require at least the 11Mb rate, were not a concern here because they couldn't authenticate anyway. Chuck Enfield Sr. Communications Engineer Telecommunications & Networking Services The Pennsylvania State University 110H, USB2, UP, PA 16802 ph: 814.863.8715 fx: 814.865-3988
Message from jfwilson1@uclan.ac.uk

We've disabled 1,2 and 5.5 rates but left everything else on (inc. 6 and 9 Mbps on g and 7 Mbps (MCS 0) on n). Working fine for us so far. 44 Buildings (inc. Halls of Residence and campus in Cyprus), 1000 Cisco APs, 3500 peak users/devices, 8000 unique users/devices per day, 1 TB traffic per day. Jennifer Wilson Networks officer University of Central Lancashire 01772 89 2116
Message from j2robert@odu.edu

That post belonged to me. You can still disable the 802.11b data rates (1, 2, 5.5, 11), which I have done at our campuses. You just need to leave the 802.11n MCS0 rate (6.5/7) in order to keep the iThingies happy. Josh Robertson Network Systems Senior Engineer Old Dominion University Office of Computing & Communications Services (757)683-5046 j2robert@odu.edu http://occs.odu.edu/
We only disable 1 and 2 as we like to get all of the consumer wireless stuff the students bring on campus connected to wireless. We use DHCP fingerprinting to auth most of the stuff that can't do 802.1X or captive portal. -Brian
Message from dannyeaton@rice.edu

Here at Rice (Cisco WAPs, 1142's, 1252's, and 3502's) we've disabled the 1 Mbps and 2 Mbps rates, but left 5.5 and above. We've had no complaints. However, like Chuck we do not have a lot of consumer devices (one 802.1x network and one "Click-to-Accept" network).
We disabled all the b speeds several years ago. Had no complaints then and continue to not have any. -jcw ------------------------------------- John Watters    UA: OIT  205-348-3992
We will probably end most of the B rates at the end of this school year. They have not been a problem since switching to Ruckus wireless. We get a LOT of BYODs on campus, we support TVs, Game Consoles, wireless printers, etc. Most of our slower B traffic has been Android devices. Harry Rauch Sr. Network Analyst Eckerd College 4200 - 54th Ave S St. Petersburg, FL 33711 On 9/27/12 9:30 AM, Watters, John wrote: > We disabled all the b speeds several years ago. Had no complaints then and continue to not have any. > > -jcw > > ------------------------------------- > John Watters UA: OIT 205-348-3992 > > >
Message from marcelo.lew@du.edu

In my experience, disabling b rates only help in areas with high AP density, in particular, Apple devices that like to be very close to the APs. In areas with low AP density, it could create issues for devices such as Macbooks. Marcelo Lew Wireless Enterprise Administrator University Technology Services University of Denver Desk: (303) 871-6523 Cell: (303) 669-4217 Fax:  (303) 871-5900 Email: mlew@du.edu
Message from marcelo.lew@du.edu

Forgot to mention, if you run Aruba (and I'm sure many others support a similar feature), you can check a flag called Broadcast/Multicast Optimization and even when leaving b rates on, broadcast and multicast won't be sent at the lowest basic rate, but the minimum supported rate by the stations connected to a particular AP (so the AP keeps track of the stations connected to him and what is the lowest rate they can do). Marcelo Lew Wireless Enterprise Administrator University Technology Services University of Denver Desk: (303) 871-6523 Cell: (303) 669-4217 Fax:  (303) 871-5900 Email: mlew@du.edu
We turned off all B rates this summer along with "802.11b protection" (we are an Aruba campus). We did it during the summer and saw immediate improvements in speed. To be effective, you need all B rates off, the goal isn't to kill the lower speeds, the goal is to kill B altogether. It's an older and less efficient protocol. Part of the reason for the increase of speed even during the quiet time of summer is that the AP's will use the lower speeds 1Mps/2Mps for management / broadcasting / Beacons / etc. By dropping B, the slowest speed is now 6 Mbps for all the base level management traffic, etc. No complaints so far, we have both open and wpa2 and all sorts of devices. Stats from last semester showed almost no B usage, so we felt pretty safe in shutting it down. I have heard that the Wii's want B/1Mbps to find the AP and then can ramp up, but haven't confirmed / seen this yet. Carl Oakes California State University Sacramento
Message from craigsimons@sfu.ca

We dropped 802.11b this time last year. I haven't received one complaint, and the performance increase was dramatic. Your mileage may vary, but I found that APs would go into b/g protection mode if they thought an 11b client "might" be around. What resulted was a situation where about half of our APs were in protection mode at any given time, even though not a single 802.11b client was connected. 

- Craig

SFU SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY
Network Services

Craig Simons
Network and Systems Administrator

Phone: 778-782-8036
Cell: 604-649-7977
Email: craigsimons@sfu.ca
Twitter: simonscraig


From: "Todd M. Hall" <tmh9@MSSTATE.EDU>
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent: Thursday, 27 September, 2012 05:54:59
Subject: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds

This has been discussed in the past, but it has been a long time.

We're at the point that we have to turn off the lower connection rates on our
campus.  I'm curious what other schools have done and the positive/negative
results from the changes.  We have disabled 1, 2, 5.5, and 11 Mbps in some of
our buildings with great success, but some might argue to just eliminate 1 & 2
Mbps rates.  Also, I'd be interested to hear from schools that have not disabled
these rates and why not.

--
Todd M. Hall
Sr. Network Analyst
Information Technology Services
Mississippi State University
tmh9@msstate.edu

**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

What about Nintendo Wii? We disabled 1 & 2 Mbps a couple of years ago and found that Wiis could no longer connect. Found that they required 1Mbps. Maybe this is no longer the case and I can back to turning it off. 

Dan Mahar
Network Manager
Information Technology Services

Peschel Computing Center off  (518) 388-8050
807 Union St. Fax (518) 388-6458
Schenectady, NY 12308 mahard@union.edu





I have also killed "b" data rates as well. The issue with the Wii is true here is article describing the issue. We have had a few complaints in the residence halls regarding the Wii. For those folks we just educate them to get a wired lan adapter for their Wii system. The only place we had to keep b data rates was for ticketmaster scanners at our stadiums using rf profiles in 7.2 code helped us localize these data rates to only those aps. http://nostringsattachedshow.com/2012/01/18/nintendo-vs-cisco/ Thanks Trent
FYI- Ticketmaster has a new Janam dual-band scanner that does nicely on 5 GHz in my testing. ________________________________________ From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] on behalf of Hurt,Trenton W. [trent.hurt@LOUISVILLE.EDU] Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2012 1:38 PM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds I have also killed "b" data rates as well. The issue with the Wii is true here is article describing the issue. We have had a few complaints in the residence halls regarding the Wii. For those folks we just educate them to get a wired lan adapter for their Wii system. The only place we had to keep b data rates was for ticketmaster scanners at our stadiums using rf profiles in 7.2 code helped us localize these data rates to only those aps. http://nostringsattachedshow.com/2012/01/18/nintendo-vs-cisco/ Thanks Trent
When I disabled the lower rates it broke the wii.  That was last year so maybe the wii has improved.  I re-enabled 1,2 and the wii started working.

We have the 1 Mbps rate turned off and the Wiis still work OK. I believe they need 2, though.

 

Bruce Osborne

Network Engineer

IT Network Services

 

(434) 592-4229

 

LIBERTY UNIVERSITY

Training Champions for Christ since 1971

 

From: John Kaftan [mailto:jkaftan@UTICA.EDU]
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2012 4:54 PM
Subject: Re: Disabling 802.11b speeds

 

When I disabled the lower rates it broke the wii.  That was last year so maybe the wii has improved.  I re-enabled 1,2 and the wii started working.

Yep, 2MBps is what they need. We advertise 2 as a basic rate, but disable it as a transmit rate in our Aruba config. The Wii's seem to work fine with this config. We haven't had any complaints of any older Wii's not working at the least. -Brian ________________________________________ From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Osborne, Bruce W [bosborne@LIBERTY.EDU] Sent: Friday, September 28, 2012 7:40 AM To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: Disabling 802.11b speeds We have the 1 Mbps rate turned off and the Wiis still work OK. I believe they need 2, though. Bruce Osborne Network Engineer IT Network Services (434) 592-4229 LIBERTY UNIVERSITY Training Champions for Christ since 1971 From: John Kaftan [mailto:jkaftan@UTICA.EDU] Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2012 4:54 PM Subject: Re: Disabling 802.11b speeds When I disabled the lower rates it broke the wii. That was last year so maybe the wii has improved. I re-enabled 1,2 and the wii started working.
Message from mark.duling@biola.edu

In our environment (Cisco WLC) I could never get Wii's on our wireless working anyway and recommended using a wired adapter so there were no clients that we ever reported to be effected by turning off lower data rates.

I never understood why I couldn't get Wii's to work on an unencrypted network, and yet in some other universities with similar environments so far as I know the admins report they work.


So if you have a dense deployment of AP's, then leaving the lower rates enabled should not present an issue - at least I've not seen one. Additionally, as my campus is 75% Macintosh, they tend to connect at 5GHz, so I don't mind having the lower rates enabled in 2.4GHz to help out all the gaming devices and such.
 
Jeff

>>> On Thursday, September 27, 2012 at 5:54 AM, in message <Pine.OSX.4.64.1209270744420.614@thall.its.msstate.edu>, "Todd M. Hall" <tmh9@MSSTATE.EDU> wrote:
This has been discussed in the past, but it has been a long time.

We're at the point that we have to turn off the lower connection rates on our
campus.  I'm curious what other schools have done and the positive/negative
results from the changes.  We have disabled 1, 2, 5.5, and 11 Mbps in some of
our buildings with great success, but some might argue to just eliminate 1 & 2
Mbps rates.  Also, I'd be interested to hear from schools that have not disabled
these rates and why not.

--
Todd M. Hall
Sr. Network Analyst
Information Technology Services
Mississippi State University
tmh9@msstate.edu

**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Sorry to drum up an old thread, but I am contemplating disabling 802.11b.  We have not had any users on 'b' in the last 6 months and are confident about turning it off.  One question I do have for those of you that use Cisco controllers, is how are you turning 'b' off?  I talked to a network consultant and they said to go into each WLAN and set the "Radio Policy" option to "802.11a/g Only" and that would take care of it.  It looks like most in this thread change the data rates to disabled under Wireless > 802.11b/g/n > Network.  I am curious to know which method is better and what your settings look like.  We are running code line 7.0 but will be upgrading to 7.2 soon if that makes a difference.

Thanks,
Alan


Message from apage@nd.edu

We only went with the option of turning off the data rates, so I can’t attest to what your consultant is telling you, but the way we did it worked exactly as we intended. Here’s a look at the settings from one of our controllers.

 

 

Andy Page

University of Notre Dame

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Alan Nord
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2013 1:53 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds

 

Sorry to drum up an old thread, but I am contemplating disabling 802.11b.  We have not had any users on 'b' in the last 6 months and are confident about turning it off.  One question I do have for those of you that use Cisco controllers, is how are you turning 'b' off?  I talked to a network consultant and they said to go into each WLAN and set the "Radio Policy" option to "802.11a/g Only" and that would take care of it.  It looks like most in this thread change the data rates to disabled under Wireless > 802.11b/g/n > Network.  I am curious to know which method is better and what your settings look like.  We are running code line 7.0 but will be upgrading to 7.2 soon if that makes a difference.

 

Thanks,

Alan

 

We did the same as below except we also disabled the 6 Mbps rate and made 12 Mbps mandatory. Have been like this for about 3 years.

 

 

 

-jcw                            

-------------------------------------
John Watters    UA: OIT  205-348-3992

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Andy Page
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2013 1:08 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds

 

We only went with the option of turning off the data rates, so I can’t attest to what your consultant is telling you, but the way we did it worked exactly as we intended. Here’s a look at the settings from one of our controllers.

 

 

Andy Page

University of Notre Dame

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Alan Nord
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2013 1:53 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds

 

Sorry to drum up an old thread, but I am contemplating disabling 802.11b.  We have not had any users on 'b' in the last 6 months and are confident about turning it off.  One question I do have for those of you that use Cisco controllers, is how are you turning 'b' off?  I talked to a network consultant and they said to go into each WLAN and set the "Radio Policy" option to "802.11a/g Only" and that would take care of it.  It looks like most in this thread change the data rates to disabled under Wireless > 802.11b/g/n > Network.  I am curious to know which method is better and what your settings look like.  We are running code line 7.0 but will be upgrading to 7.2 soon if that makes a difference.

 

Thanks,

Alan

 

I just turned off 802.11b this past Sunday on our campus and this is how I did it. We disabled data rates 1-11 and made 12 Mandatory, and the rest supported.


LaMarr Baucom
Wireless Network Engineer
Murray State University
(270) 809-2299
lamarr.baucom@murraystate.edu

MSU Information Systems staff will never ask for your password or other confidential information via email. 


Message from j.d.f.palmer@swansea.ac.uk

Unless something has changed then I understand this is the way to do it if you intend to use Band Select, as Band Select makes it mandatory for all bands/Radio Policies to be enabled.

So you enable all Radio Policies (inc .11b), but disable the .11b speeds.

 

From the footnotes of WLAN > ‘SSID Name’ > Advanced on the controller management GUI.

8. Band Select is configurable only when Radio Policy is set to 'All'.

 

Thanks,

Jezz.

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Andy Page
Sent: 08 March 2013 19:08
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds

 

We only went with the option of turning off the data rates, so I can’t attest to what your consultant is telling you, but the way we did it worked exactly as we intended. Here’s a look at the settings from one of our controllers.

 

 

Andy Page

University of Notre Dame

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Alan Nord
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2013 1:53 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds

 

Sorry to drum up an old thread, but I am contemplating disabling 802.11b.  We have not had any users on 'b' in the last 6 months and are confident about turning it off.  One question I do have for those of you that use Cisco controllers, is how are you turning 'b' off?  I talked to a network consultant and they said to go into each WLAN and set the "Radio Policy" option to "802.11a/g Only" and that would take care of it.  It looks like most in this thread change the data rates to disabled under Wireless > 802.11b/g/n > Network.  I am curious to know which method is better and what your settings look like.  We are running code line 7.0 but will be upgrading to 7.2 soon if that makes a difference.

 

Thanks,

Alan

 

Actually, only early OS Nntendo Wii needed 1 mbps. They need 2 mbps, though. We have had 1 mbps disabled for years with no adverse effects.

 

 
Bruce Osborne
Wireless Network Engineer
IT Network Services
 
(434) 592-4229
 
LIBERTY UNIVERSITY
40 Years of Training Champions for Christ: 1971-2011
 
From: Palmer J.D.F. [J.D.F.Palmer@SWANSEA.AC.UK]
Sent: Saturday, March 09, 2013 3:06 PM
Subject: Re: Disabling 802.11b speeds

You can run a report from within NCS (and no doubt WCS) to give you all users using a particular connection protocol, eg 802.11b.

Navigate to…

Reports > Report Launch Pad > Client > Unique Clients > Unique Clients Report Details

Then select ‘All’ for ‘Report by’ and ‘Report Criteria’, then select ‘802.11b’ from the ‘Connection Protocol’ from the respective dropdowns.

 

A side note, disabling 1mbs stop Nintendo Wii consoles from associating.

Is anyone aware of any other device that is known to suffer when disabling any of the faster speeds?  I have Kindle in my mind for some reason when disabling 6mbs.

 

Cheers,

Jezz.

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Tristan Gulyas
Sent: 09 March 2013 03:53
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds

 

Hi,

 

We're looking into this, too.

 

What's the best way to obtain data as to which clients are only 802.11b-capable on a Cisco environment?  I do see a few connections at 802.11b data rates but we'd ideally like to know how many legacy devices out there that we have.

 

Cheers,

Tristan

 

On 09/03/2013, at 8:22 AM, Alan Nord <anord@MACALESTER.EDU> wrote:



Thanks for the quick responses.  I like the idea of using client band select so I am going to go the same route as many of you and disable the specific data rates.  Going to give Andy's config a try.

 

Thanks again!

 

So Bruce,  

You disable the 1Mbps rate, and leave 2Mbps rate enabled so the Wii's can connect.  Do you disable any of the other 802.11b rates as well?

I turned off all of the B rates a few years ago but then quickly learned about the Wii issue.  While I like the solution of keeping the b rates off and telling the wii users to use an ethernet cable, we have a few locations where students live that are wireless only, so that option doesn't work for us. I ended up relenting and turning the B rates back on to make the Wii users happy.  Reading this conversation I'm thinking about taking another shot at disabling some of the slower rates, but leaving 2Mbps for the Wii people.

Message from iam@st-andrews.ac.uk

I wasn’t under the impression that a wii could connect to an enterprise wireless network? Am I wrong?

 

--

ian

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Adam Forsyth
Sent: 19 March 2013 14:00
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds

 

So Bruce,  

 

You disable the 1Mbps rate, and leave 2Mbps rate enabled so the Wii's can connect.  Do you disable any of the other 802.11b rates as well?

 

I turned off all of the B rates a few years ago but then quickly learned about the Wii issue.  While I like the solution of keeping the b rates off and telling the wii users to use an ethernet cable, we have a few locations where students live that are wireless only, so that option doesn't work for us. I ended up relenting and turning the B rates back on to make the Wii users happy.  Reading this conversation I'm thinking about taking another shot at disabling some of the slower rates, but leaving 2Mbps for the Wii people.

Hi,

To resurrect an old thread, we've run into an incompatibility that affects all Realtek chipsets (other than the 8188CE with latest drivers dated March 2013) which do not associate if we have 802.11b data rates present (mandatory or supported) but not ALL of them.

So, 1/2/5.5/11 enabled = works
11Mbit mandatory, all other 802.11b rates disabled (12Mbit/sec+ set to supported) = fail.

The 8188CE driver update released this March resolves the issue with the 8188CE but other Realtek chipset users are out of luck.

We're looking at disabling 802.11b entirely as this also resolves the issue.

The workaround on the device configuration with this RF profile present is to set the Realtek NIC to do 802.11b only.  For some reason, this works!

Has anybody else run into this issue?

Cheers,
Tristan
---
Tristan Gulyas                  Tristan.Gulyas@monash.edu
Wireless Network Engineer  
eSolutions division      
Building 205  Monash University   3800   Australia


On 20/03/2013, at 2:04 AM, Palmer J.D.F. <J.D.F.Palmer@SWANSEA.AC.UK> wrote:

It can’t, but can be connected to a PSK network.
 
We found that in certain halls and other high density use areas we had very high channel utilisation with 1 & 2mbs enabled, so disabling the them might have upset a couple of Wii’s (literally a couple) but it’s a small price to pay, channel utilisation dropped from 90%+ to around 50% when these speeds were disabled.
It would be nice to be able disable the other 11b speeds (and possibly 6mbs) if it was safe to do so with upsetting fussy devices.
 
Jezz.
 
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDUOn Behalf OfIan McDonald
Sent: 19 March 2013 14:57
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds
 
I wasn’t under the impression that a wii could connect to an enterprise wireless network? Am I wrong?
 
--
ian
 
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDUOn Behalf OfAdam Forsyth
Sent: 19 March 2013 14:00
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds
 
So Bruce,  
 
You disable the 1Mbps rate, and leave 2Mbps rate enabled so the Wii's can connect.  Do you disable any of the other 802.11b rates as well?
 

I turned off all of the B rates a few years ago but then quickly learned about the Wii issue.  While I like the solution of keeping the b rates off and telling the wii users to use an ethernet cable, we have a few locations where students live that are wireless only, so that option doesn't work for us. I ended up relenting and turning the B rates back on to make the Wii users happy.  Reading this conversation I'm thinking about taking another shot at disabling some of the slower rates, but leaving 2Mbps for the Wii people.

Hi,

To resurrect an old thread, we've run into an incompatibility that affects all Realtek chipsets (other than the 8188CE with latest drivers dated March 2013) which do not associate if we have 802.11b data rates present (mandatory or supported) but not ALL of them.

So, 1/2/5.5/11 enabled = works
11Mbit mandatory, all other 802.11b rates disabled (12Mbit/sec+ set to supported) = fail.

The 8188CE driver update released this March resolves the issue with the 8188CE but other Realtek chipset users are out of luck.

We're looking at disabling 802.11b entirely as this also resolves the issue.

The workaround on the device configuration with this RF profile present is to set the Realtek NIC to do 802.11b only.  For some reason, this works!

Has anybody else run into this issue?

Cheers,
Tristan
---
Tristan Gulyas                  Tristan.Gulyas@monash.edu
Wireless Network Engineer  
eSolutions division      
Building 205  Monash University   3800   Australia


On 20/03/2013, at 2:04 AM, Palmer J.D.F. <J.D.F.Palmer@SWANSEA.AC.UK> wrote:

It can’t, but can be connected to a PSK network.
 
We found that in certain halls and other high density use areas we had very high channel utilisation with 1 & 2mbs enabled, so disabling the them might have upset a couple of Wii’s (literally a couple) but it’s a small price to pay, channel utilisation dropped from 90%+ to around 50% when these speeds were disabled.
It would be nice to be able disable the other 11b speeds (and possibly 6mbs) if it was safe to do so with upsetting fussy devices.
 
Jezz.
 
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDUOn Behalf OfIan McDonald
Sent: 19 March 2013 14:57
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds
 
I wasn’t under the impression that a wii could connect to an enterprise wireless network? Am I wrong?
 
--
ian
 
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDUOn Behalf OfAdam Forsyth
Sent: 19 March 2013 14:00
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Disabling 802.11b speeds
 
So Bruce,  
 
You disable the 1Mbps rate, and leave 2Mbps rate enabled so the Wii's can connect.  Do you disable any of the other 802.11b rates as well?
 

I turned off all of the B rates a few years ago but then quickly learned about the Wii issue.  While I like the solution of keeping the b rates off and telling the wii users to use an ethernet cable, we have a few locations where students live that are wireless only, so that option doesn't work for us. I ended up relenting and turning the B rates back on to make the Wii users happy.  Reading this conversation I'm thinking about taking another shot at disabling some of the slower rates, but leaving 2Mbps for the Wii people.

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