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Message from dannyeaton@rice.edu

There seems to be a growing demand, and with the holiday season upon us, I’m expecting more than a few requests when we all come back.  Is anyone allowing residential students to register game consoles on a wireless SSID?  If so, how?  WPA2-PSK?  MAC address registration? 

 

 

 

               Respectfully,

 

               Danny Eaton

 

               Snr. Network Architect

               Networking, Telecommunications, & Operations

               Rice University, IT

               Mudd Bldg, RM #205

               Jones College Associate

               Office - 713-348-5233

               Cellular - 832-247-7496

               dannyeaton@rice.edu

 

               Soli Deo Gloria

               Matt 18:4-6

 

G.K. Chesterton, “Christianity has not been tried and found wanting.  It’s been found hard and left untried.”

 

 

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

On 12/23/2013 4:43 PM, Danny Eaton wrote:

There seems to be a growing demand, and with the holiday season upon us, I’m expecting more than a few requests when we all come back.  Is anyone allowing residential students to register game consoles on a wireless SSID?  If so, how?  WPA2-PSK?  MAC address registration?


We "tolerate" it, but we strongly encourage wired connections for game consoles, TVs, BluRays, etc.

We have game console registration support based on MAC address OID verification.  The others we are at this point manually registering (they enter a helpdesk ticket).

If you have a spectrum analyzer sort of device that will give you a "timeslice breakdown" of a given radio channel, you'll quickly be alarmed by the utilization of these silly devices :(

Jeff
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We recommend that students use a “wired connection” as well.  For PS3 units they use a built in browser which hits our captive portal with our student network agreement and they have to sign in with their credentials, which registers the console.  We manage this using Netreg (an automated DHCP registration system) available at http://netreg.sourceforge.net/.

 

For other devices like Xbox that don’t have the built in browser, we have Residential Technology Assistants place a ticket with the MAC address and I manually add them into the Netreg system.

 

We have a miscellaneous wireless network, which changes passwords every semester that they can join their gaming consoles to.

 

Best,

 

Joe

 

 

 

Register then connect to our open SSID

 
Tim Cappalli  |  ACCP /  ACMP /  CCNA
Network Engineer  |  Brandeis University
cappalli@brandeis.edu | (617) 701-7149


We have them register it on our home made device registration page. We currently have a separate SSID for game consoles and devices that don't have a web browser. The SSID is open but we use mac-authentication for it so when they register, the mac address goes into our system.


On 12/23/2013 4:43 PM, Danny Eaton wrote:

There seems to be a growing demand, and with the holiday season upon us, I’m expecting more than a few requests when we all come back.  Is anyone allowing residential students to register game consoles on a wireless SSID?  If so, how?  WPA2-PSK?  MAC address registration? 

 

 

 

               Respectfully,

 

               Danny Eaton

 

               Snr. Network Architect

               Networking, Telecommunications, & Operations

               Rice University, IT

               Mudd Bldg, RM #205

               Jones College Associate

               Office - 713-348-5233

               Cellular - 832-247-7496

               dannyeaton@rice.edu

 

               Soli Deo Gloria

               Matt 18:4-6

 

G.K. Chesterton, “Christianity has not been tried and found wanting.  It’s been found hard and left untried.”

 

 

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


-- Vlade Ristevski Network Manager IT Services Ramapo College (201)-684-6854 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We do not supply PSK connectivity, but there is an open guest network if they want to attempt to use it.  That guest network is severely rate-limited.  Like most of the respondents so far, we push them to wired connections.

There was a discussion about this a couple years ago.  the gist of the discussion was to create a gaming network where you blocked things like social-media, email and access to your student systems.  The theory was to block these to discourage every-day use by other mobile devices.

There's probably a nice NAC solution to this.

-Brian

On 12/24/2013 2:14 PM, Brian Helman wrote:
There was a discussion about this a couple years ago.  the gist of the discussion was to create a gaming network where you blocked things like social-media, email and access to your student systems.  The theory was to block these to discourage every-day use by other mobile devices.

There's probably a nice NAC solution to this.

We are "half-way" there.  We have the front-end NAC registration, and classify all game consoles with a common role, but have not yet done the specific vlan assignment of that role.  Our default network arrangement places them in a common vlan per residential complex, but the intent was to have the "gaming" vlan common across all of Resnet.  Not quite there but the pieces are in place.

We have done similar registration/classification of BYOD things, and we DO have them isolated from PCs/Macs/etc computers.  But we are not actively treating them any differently at this time.

Jeff
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

The problem with blocking commonly used services is that the game systems now have apps and baked in features that need to access those services.

 

 

Tim Cappalli  |  ACCP /  ACMP /  CCNA
Network Engineer  |  Brandeis University
cappalli@brandeis.edu | (617) 701-7149

 

We haven't tried this solution yet, so I haven't experienced the downside.  Based on what you are saying, I think the solution could be a mix of identification, isolation and rate shaping (of the "commonly used services").

-Brian

Message from dannyeaton@rice.edu

There seems to be a growing demand, and with the holiday season upon us, I’m expecting more than a few requests when we all come back.  Is anyone allowing residential students to register game consoles on a wireless SSID?  If so, how?  WPA2-PSK?  MAC address registration? 

 

 

 

               Respectfully,

 

               Danny Eaton

 

               Snr. Network Architect

               Networking, Telecommunications, & Operations

               Rice University, IT

               Mudd Bldg, RM #205

               Jones College Associate

               Office - 713-348-5233

               Cellular - 832-247-7496

               dannyeaton@rice.edu

 

               Soli Deo Gloria

               Matt 18:4-6

 

G.K. Chesterton, “Christianity has not been tried and found wanting.  It’s been found hard and left untried.”

 

 

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

On 12/23/2013 4:43 PM, Danny Eaton wrote:

There seems to be a growing demand, and with the holiday season upon us, I’m expecting more than a few requests when we all come back.  Is anyone allowing residential students to register game consoles on a wireless SSID?  If so, how?  WPA2-PSK?  MAC address registration?


We "tolerate" it, but we strongly encourage wired connections for game consoles, TVs, BluRays, etc.

We have game console registration support based on MAC address OID verification.  The others we are at this point manually registering (they enter a helpdesk ticket).

If you have a spectrum analyzer sort of device that will give you a "timeslice breakdown" of a given radio channel, you'll quickly be alarmed by the utilization of these silly devices :(

Jeff
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We recommend that students use a “wired connection” as well.  For PS3 units they use a built in browser which hits our captive portal with our student network agreement and they have to sign in with their credentials, which registers the console.  We manage this using Netreg (an automated DHCP registration system) available at http://netreg.sourceforge.net/.

 

For other devices like Xbox that don’t have the built in browser, we have Residential Technology Assistants place a ticket with the MAC address and I manually add them into the Netreg system.

 

We have a miscellaneous wireless network, which changes passwords every semester that they can join their gaming consoles to.

 

Best,

 

Joe

 

 

 

Register then connect to our open SSID

 
Tim Cappalli  |  ACCP /  ACMP /  CCNA
Network Engineer  |  Brandeis University
cappalli@brandeis.edu | (617) 701-7149


We have them register it on our home made device registration page. We currently have a separate SSID for game consoles and devices that don't have a web browser. The SSID is open but we use mac-authentication for it so when they register, the mac address goes into our system.


On 12/23/2013 4:43 PM, Danny Eaton wrote:

There seems to be a growing demand, and with the holiday season upon us, I’m expecting more than a few requests when we all come back.  Is anyone allowing residential students to register game consoles on a wireless SSID?  If so, how?  WPA2-PSK?  MAC address registration? 

 

 

 

               Respectfully,

 

               Danny Eaton

 

               Snr. Network Architect

               Networking, Telecommunications, & Operations

               Rice University, IT

               Mudd Bldg, RM #205

               Jones College Associate

               Office - 713-348-5233

               Cellular - 832-247-7496

               dannyeaton@rice.edu

 

               Soli Deo Gloria

               Matt 18:4-6

 

G.K. Chesterton, “Christianity has not been tried and found wanting.  It’s been found hard and left untried.”

 

 

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


-- Vlade Ristevski Network Manager IT Services Ramapo College (201)-684-6854 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We do not supply PSK connectivity, but there is an open guest network if they want to attempt to use it.  That guest network is severely rate-limited.  Like most of the respondents so far, we push them to wired connections.

There was a discussion about this a couple years ago.  the gist of the discussion was to create a gaming network where you blocked things like social-media, email and access to your student systems.  The theory was to block these to discourage every-day use by other mobile devices.

There's probably a nice NAC solution to this.

-Brian

On 12/24/2013 2:14 PM, Brian Helman wrote:
There was a discussion about this a couple years ago.  the gist of the discussion was to create a gaming network where you blocked things like social-media, email and access to your student systems.  The theory was to block these to discourage every-day use by other mobile devices.

There's probably a nice NAC solution to this.

We are "half-way" there.  We have the front-end NAC registration, and classify all game consoles with a common role, but have not yet done the specific vlan assignment of that role.  Our default network arrangement places them in a common vlan per residential complex, but the intent was to have the "gaming" vlan common across all of Resnet.  Not quite there but the pieces are in place.

We have done similar registration/classification of BYOD things, and we DO have them isolated from PCs/Macs/etc computers.  But we are not actively treating them any differently at this time.

Jeff
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

The problem with blocking commonly used services is that the game systems now have apps and baked in features that need to access those services.

 

 

Tim Cappalli  |  ACCP /  ACMP /  CCNA
Network Engineer  |  Brandeis University
cappalli@brandeis.edu | (617) 701-7149

 

We haven't tried this solution yet, so I haven't experienced the downside.  Based on what you are saying, I think the solution could be a mix of identification, isolation and rate shaping (of the "commonly used services").

-Brian

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