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We’ll be moving to an Aruba wireless solution this summer which will give us a lot of capabilities we haven’t had.  One of the objectives is to allow gaming consoles on the wireless network in order to eventually remove wired ports from the dorms.

 

Has anyone put together some information on what is needed to get the consoles on the WLAN that would be will to share it?  I believe the Wii may require 1Mbps and 2Mbps (which obviously sucks for dense deployments).  Wondering if this is true and what other caveats there may be with other consoles that others have come across.

 

Thanks,

Brian

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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Message from toivo@usf.edu

A couple of observations, in no order of importance:

-Getting people to buy the dual-band wireless adapters, instead of 2.4 GHz –only ones, for consoles that aren’t natively wireless.

-NAT will kill a lot of games. Unless there’s a magic way to support uPnP in an enterprise wireless system, you may have to put the consoles on public address space or come up with some other workaround, or give people limited functionality (unless you already enforced NAT on the wired consoles and people are used to it.)

-Wiis have been a problem, and require slowest 802.11b rates. Some Nintendos also didn’t work well with some load balancing algorithms. We’ve told Wii users to pay up for the wired adapter, as we can’t support them on wireless anymore. (Which, of course, is opposite of what you want to do.)

 

-Toivo, speaking for himself.

 

 

We allow all game systems on our open SSID with the exception of Wii (we removed the 1 and 2 rates). Starting in the fall, we will be providing wired ports by request only.

 

We use a combination of DHCP fingerprinting and MAC OUI prefixes to assign game systems to a gaming role and VLAN.

 

 

Tim Cappalli, ACMP CCNA | (802) 626-6456

Office of Information Technology (OIT) | Lyndon

» cappalli@lyndonstate.edu | oit.lyndonstate.edu

 

 

Message from russ.leathe@gordon.edu

Our goal was to support game consoles, but keep the traffic off of our production WAN.  Also, we had a flood of LG070 VOIP phones as well.  Here’s what we did…

 

1.)    Create a separate WAN for game consoles and VOIP phones (specifically the LG070).

2.)    Create a separate SSID (hidden) for this purpose

3.)    Gamers must contact us and register their MAC

4.)    We enter their MAC as username and password in the internal DB. – for authentication, we zero this out each year so students need to re-register.

 

Alcatel/Aruba shop with 6000 and M3, AP105’s

 

Hope this helps

 

russ

 

Message from r_harris@culinary.edu

We have an issue with Xbox units not wanting to connect because they see more than one AP broadcasting an SSID, it's some security feature M$ has placed into the xbox code. I have to assume it's so if you and your neighbors all have "netgear" as your ssid, you have to make your unique so you know what network you're really on. It doesn't happen to all of them (which is odd) but it's a pain for the ones that do experience it.
 
If anyone has a work around for that, I would be very happy to hear it.
 
Robert Harris
Manager of Network
and Audio/Video
Culinary Institute of America
1946 Campus Drive
Hyde Park, NY
845-451-1681

Food is Life

Create and Savor Yours.™

 

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.



>>> "Kellogg, Brian D." <bkellogg@SBU.EDU> 5/17/2012 2:35 PM >>>

We’ll be moving to an Aruba wireless solution this summer which will give us a lot of capabilities we haven’t had.  One of the objectives is to allow gaming consoles on the wireless network in order to eventually remove wired ports from the dorms.

 

Has anyone put together some information on what is needed to get the consoles on the WLAN that would be will to share it?  I believe the Wii may require 1Mbps and 2Mbps (which obviously sucks for dense deployments).  Wondering if this is true and what other caveats there may be with other consoles that others have come across.

 

Thanks,

Brian

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Hi Robert,

 

We have at least a couple hundred Xbox 360s connecting regularly, but I have never seen that issue. Does that happen when the network setup is done manually, as opposed to choosing the network from the list of available networks?

 

Matt Barber ‘06

Network and Systems Manager

Morrisville State College

315-684-6053

 

Doesn't the 3DS also need the lower rates? I had heard that but haven't confirmed.



On 5/17/2012 1:35 PM, Kellogg, Brian D. wrote:

We’ll be moving to an Aruba wireless solution this summer which will give us a lot of capabilities we haven’t had.  One of the objectives is to allow gaming consoles on the wireless network in order to eventually remove wired ports from the dorms.

 

Has anyone put together some information on what is needed to get the consoles on the WLAN that would be will to share it?  I believe the Wii may require 1Mbps and 2Mbps (which obviously sucks for dense deployments).  Wondering if this is true and what other caveats there may be with other consoles that others have come across.

 

Thanks,

Brian

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.



--
Heath Barnhart, CCNA
Network Administrator
Information Technology Services
Washburn University
Topeka, KS
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from bosborne@liberty.edu

I am not sure about the 3DS.

 

Here is what we have been running on Aruba here at Liberty University. It has worked well with everything.  The Wii needs 2 mbit basic rate, but you do not need to transmit that rate.

 

wlan ssid-profile "Lxxxx"

   essid "xxxx"

   g-basic-rates 2 5

   g-tx-rates 5 6 9 11 12 18 24 36 48 54

   wmm

   wmm-vo-dscp 46

   wmm-vi-dscp 34

   wmm-be-dscp 0

!

 

Bruce Osborne

Network Engineer

IT Network Services

 

(434) 592-4229

 

LIBERTY UNIVERSITY

Training Champions for Christ since 1971

 

From: Heath Barnhart [mailto:heath.barnhart@WASHBURN.EDU]
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2012 9:31 AM
Subject: Re: gaming consoles

 

Doesn't the 3DS also need the lower rates? I had heard that but haven't confirmed.



On 5/17/2012 1:35 PM, Kellogg, Brian D. wrote:

We’ll be moving to an Aruba wireless solution this summer which will give us a lot of capabilities we haven’t had.  One of the objectives is to allow gaming consoles on the wireless network in order to eventually remove wired ports from the dorms.

 

Has anyone put together some information on what is needed to get the consoles on the WLAN that would be will to share it?  I believe the Wii may require 1Mbps and 2Mbps (which obviously sucks for dense deployments).  Wondering if this is true and what other caveats there may be with other consoles that others have come across.

 

Thanks,

Brian

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

 

--
Heath Barnhart, CCNA
Network Administrator
Information Technology Services
Washburn University
Topeka, KS

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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