Main Nav

I am hard pressed to explain this.  We’ve had a good number of reports of PS3s not being able to connect to wired or wireless in our residence halls.  This corresponded to a pervasive wireless initiative that resulted in all new switches and Aruba access points installed for about 8,000 resident students.  The PS3s would not show any wireless networks available, but more surprisingly, they would not establish a physical connection to switch ports, either.  I brought a PS3 back to my office, and completely ignoring the wireless side, attempted to figure out what was happening to the wired side.  I connected it, with success, to every type of switch I could find, new and old.  I sent it back.  We got more reports, and now I was forced to go into the field to look at the issue.  I went to a dorm with a troubled unit, reset it, and configured it for a wired connection.  It would not establish a link.  Could it be a switch negotiation incompatibility issue?  I turned off negotiation and manually set the config on both sides to no success.  I then used an old hub that I knew would work to bridge the PS3 to our network.  No link to the hub from the PS3.  At this point, we took the same device and hub to a new location on campus.  Booted up the PS3, with it ONLY connected to the hub (the hub wasn’t connected to anything), and we got a physical link.  I went into network settings to see if I could see wireless networks (I saw a good number).  But then it dawned on me that we were in a significantly less dense wireless environment in the environment where the device was working.  It should have no effect on the device since we were configured for wired, but I was grasping at straws.   Was it possible that the density of Aps (and subsequent beacons) back at the original dorm was throwing the PS3 into a bad state caused the wired port to not work?

 

So, we went back to the dorm, shut down ALL of the access points in the building that were near it, and then booted it up.  LINKED FIRST TRY.  It linked directly to the switch, and then indirectly through the hub.  I started to power back on access points, and about halfway through, the physical link went away.  We then reversed course, turned the Aps back off and rebooted the PS3 to verify it would get a link again.  It did.  I then turned all the Aps back on, to lose the PS3 link.  We then rebooted the PS3 with all Aps back on, and it would not establish a link.  There was no bridging occurring through the PS3 that would cause a spantree lock (verified). 

 

I am at a loss to explain this.

 

Ryan H Turner

Senior Network Engineer

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

CB 1150 Chapel Hill, NC 27599

+1 919 445 0113 Office

+1 919 274 7926 Mobile

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Message from pmauretti@massasoit.mass.edu

Very interesting. 

 

How many AP’s are we talking about?  How many SSID’s? 

 

 

Patrick Mauretti

Sr. Network Admin

Massasoit Community College

1 Massasoit Blvd

Brockton, MA 02302

508-588-9100 x1660

“On the internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.”

 

Wow.... I'm not sure what to even think of this.   I had to read it twice just to be sure I understood it.  I'll be honest, I haven't a clue and would be inclined to say I wouldn't have believed it!  Do PS3's use the same MAC address for both wired and wireless I recall?  Might be some clue in there somewhere.



Take a look at this link:

 

http://community.arubanetworks.com/t5/Education/PS3-dropping-off-the-network/gpm-p/126499/highlight/true#M565

 

Once we disabled ARM OTA in the residence halls the older PS3 devices were able to connect wired and wirelessly.

 

“The PS3 (CL917784871-CECH-L01) that we have been working with falls under first generation and its version(s) are CECH-LXX, CECH-KXX and CECH-MXX. WLAN NIC in older PS3s(First Generation) do not handle OTA frames which will be "unrecognized frames" correctly.

 

Ideally, the PS3 should IGNORE these frames and carry on, but it results in connection drop.

 

As it’s a client inability at this point to handle such frames, we have successfully worked around this issue by disabling OTA which would be a potential fix as such for client side issue.”

 

 

Eric Rose

Network Engineer

Salisbury University

Office: 410.677.5367

 

 

 

Just fyi,

this was discussed on the resnet mailing list, same as Eric mentioned.

30 Jan 2014
Resnet Forum <RESNET-L@LISTSERV.ND.EDU>
> We recently disabled OTA updates and the feedback we've gotten from students has been positive. It appears that was our issue. Thanks for the suggestions. ~~ > We have seen this issue as well with some of the first generation PS3’s. > Some of them we are able to update the code manually to the newest ps3 version and they will start working. Then others when we updated they still do not work. Still trying to figure out what the issue maybe…. Doesn’t seem very consistent. best! jim


On 2/26/2014 12:47 PM, Eric Rose wrote:

Take a look at this link:

 

http://community.arubanetworks.com/t5/Education/PS3-dropping-off-the-network/gpm-p/126499/highlight/true#M565

 

Once we disabled ARM OTA in the residence halls the older PS3 devices were able to connect wired and wirelessly.

 

“The PS3 (CL917784871-CECH-L01) that we have been working with falls under first generation and its version(s) are CECH-LXX, CECH-KXX and CECH-MXX. WLAN NIC in older PS3s(First Generation) do not handle OTA frames which will be "unrecognized frames" correctly.

 

Ideally, the PS3 should IGNORE these frames and carry on, but it results in connection drop.

 

As it’s a client inability at this point to handle such frames, we have successfully worked around this issue by disabling OTA which would be a potential fix as such for client side issue.”

 

 

Eric Rose

Network Engineer

Salisbury University

Office: 410.677.5367

 

 

 

The dorm is on the small side.  We have around 30 Aps.  I shut down the middle of the building and about 10 Aps.  Running 3 SSIDs.

 

I see there are some good responses of similar issues, so I’m off to research some of the solutions others have posted J

 

Ryan H Turner

Senior Network Engineer

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

CB 1150 Chapel Hill, NC 27599

+1 919 445 0113 Office

+1 919 274 7926 Mobile

 

Yeah, PS3s use the same mac on both wired and wireless.

 

Ryan H Turner

Senior Network Engineer

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

CB 1150 Chapel Hill, NC 27599

+1 919 445 0113 Office

+1 919 274 7926 Mobile

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Michael Sjulstad
Sent: Wednesday, February 26, 2014 12:47 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Ripley's Believe it or not, wireless edition

 

Wow.... I'm not sure what to even think of this.   I had to read it twice just to be sure I understood it.  I'll be honest, I haven't a clue and would be inclined to say I wouldn't have believed it!  Do PS3's use the same MAC address for both wired and wireless I recall?  Might be some clue in there somewhere.

 

 

Thank you so much for posting this!

 

Ryan H Turner

Senior Network Engineer

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

CB 1150 Chapel Hill, NC 27599

+1 919 445 0113 Office

+1 919 274 7926 Mobile

 

Interesting. – We are also experiencing the same issue with PS3.   Turned off OTA and now the PS3 works.

 

 

Eric Kurtz
Network Engineer

Office of Information Technology
Susquehanna University
514 University Avenue
Selinsgrove, PA 17870-1164
570.372.4537
kurtz@susqu.edu

 

Yeah, we are going to hopefully try that this afternoon.

 

Ryan H Turner

Senior Network Engineer

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

CB 1150 Chapel Hill, NC 27599

+1 919 445 0113 Office

+1 919 274 7926 Mobile

 

Ok.  We turned off the OTA and it fixed the PS3.  For some amusement, one of our resnet staffers wrapped their PS3 in aluminum foil, and it also appears to work J  So, if you don’t want to disable OTA, you know what to tell them to do J

 

Ryan H Turner

Senior Network Engineer

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

CB 1150 Chapel Hill, NC 27599

+1 919 445 0113 Office

+1 919 274 7926 Mobile

 

  What is the ARM OTA setting called?  We're on 6.1.3.9.
Thanks, 
- Don 


I don’t think the feature was implemented until late 6.2.

 

-Eric

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Wright, Don
Sent: Wednesday, February 26, 2014 9:57 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Ripley's Believe it or not, wireless edition

 

  What is the ARM OTA setting called?  We're on 6.1.3.9.

Thanks, 

- Don 

 

Don,

On 6.3.1.1 it is under 802.11a/b radio >ARM > Advanced > “ARM Over the Air Updates”

 

 

 

Eric Kurtz
Network Engineer

Office of Information Technology
Susquehanna University
514 University Avenue
Selinsgrove, PA 17870-1164
570.372.4537
kurtz@susqu.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Wright, Don
Sent: Wednesday, February 26, 2014 9:57 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Ripley's Believe it or not, wireless edition

 

  What is the ARM OTA setting called?  We're on 6.1.3.9.

Thanks, 

- Don 

 

Close
Close


Annual Conference
September 29–October 2
View Proceedings

Events for all Levels and Interests

Whether you're looking for a conference to attend face-to-face to connect with peers, or for an online event for team professional development, see what's upcoming.

Close

Digital Badges
Member recognition effort
Earn yours >

Career Center


Leadership and Management Programs

EDUCAUSE Institute
Project Management

 

 

Jump Start Your Career Growth

Explore EDUCAUSE professional development opportunities that match your career aspirations and desired level of time investment through our interactive online guide.

 

Close
EDUCAUSE organizes its efforts around three IT Focus Areas

 

 

Join These Programs If Your Focus Is

Close

Get on the Higher Ed IT Map

Employees of EDUCAUSE member institutions and organizations are invited to create individual profiles.
 

 

Close

2014 Strategic Priorities

  • Building the Profession
  • IT as a Game Changer
  • Foundations


Learn More >

Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good™

EDUCAUSE is the foremost community of higher education IT leaders and professionals.