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Message from c.baugh@tcu.edu

Good morning,

 

Does anyone have a sanitized Wireless Device Policy, used at a large campus, stating what types of devices are allowed and not allowed?

 

With the influx of wireless devices and demands, TCU is considering re-vamping their policy and we are curious what other  colleges are doing.

 

Any guidance would be appreciated.

 

Regards,

//Craig Baugh

Information Technology Division

Network Engineer

c.baugh@tcu.edu

(o) 817-257-4546

 

 

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Comments

Message from toivo@usf.edu

(This is my take on things, not official policy, not speaking for the university etc.)

 

Our view has traditionally been that as long as a 802.11 device isn’t a security risk and doesn’t negatively affect the network and other users, it’s fine. Especially our residence halls are people’s homes, and they expect to use the same devices there that they would in any other residential setting. The notable exception are wireless access points other than those managed by the university and wireless routers. Obviously we do try to inform people about the problems they’re likely to encounter with wireless printers, time capsules etc. but they’re not prohibited.

 

Dealing with non-802.11 wireless devices is a bit trickier. Basically, if asked, we try to discourage anything that runs in the ISM bands that wifi uses. Anything that actually interferes with the university’s wifi network, like wireless cameras and such can be banned/taken down.

 

--

Toivo Voll

 

Message from dannyeaton@rice.edu

I realize this is a month or so behind, but I'd be interested in this as well, if anyone is willing to share.
>Thanks for the reminder that we technically have no authority over the radio spectrum, even in our own campuses.

The key word here is "technically."  This is (yet) another case where we should let the lawyers be the lawyers. Don't let the FCC spook you. Go talk to your general counsel.

You have broad discretion in defining community standards. We often offer to stop taking someone's tuition. That is usually a good incentive in our environment. 

           
Rand
 
Rand P. Hall
Director, Network Services                 askIT!
Merrimack College
978-837-3532

If I had an hour to save the world, I would spend 59 minutes defining the problem and one minute finding solutions. – Einstein


We are looking to revise our wireless policy on campus. We would like to ensure that we emphasize prohibiting Rogue and interfering devices in 2.4GHz and 5Ghz spectrum. Of course we do not want to recreate the wheel, so we are looking to the educational community to see what Wireless Policy you might have in place. Anyone care to share? Thanks, Max Lopez Senior Wireless Engineer Office of Information Technology University of Colorado www.colorado.edu max.lopez@colorado.edu
Message from dannyeaton@rice.edu

I realize this is a month or so behind, but I'd be interested in this as well, if anyone is willing to share.
All, I, too, would be interested in any discussion on this topic. It's something we may consider as well. Thank you to all in advance for your comments. Sincerely, J. Scot Prunckle Network Engineer University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Office: (414) 229-7206 Cell: (414) 208-6703 E-mail: prunckle@uwm.edu
Message from jack@mail.rockefeller.edu

Here's what we have: Network Requirements and Restrictions End-user devices (computers, network-ready scanners, printers, and similar devices) may be attached to the RU Network via a connection to an activated Network Attachment Point (“data jack”) with approval of the IT Department. Each data jack is intended to support only one end-user device. Cascading or daisy-chaining or attaching any network infrastructure device may compromise the RU Network and is not permitted. Examples of prohibited network infrastructure devices include: •hubs and switches • routers • repeaters • wireless access points • Apple Time Capsule servers • computers acting as routers • proxy servers • DHCP servers Users are not permitted to extend the network jack cables from one location to another through walls or between floors. Users may not engage the services of a third party for any network cabling. If a connection out of the immediate vicinity of the jack should be required, a request should be addressed to the IT Help Desk. If new installation of a data jack is required, submit a service request or contact the Help Desk. Network addresses are the property of the University and can only be issued by IT. Users cannot select or assign addresses themselves. IT will either manually or automatically disable service to any addresses that have not been properly assigned. In order to ensure network reliability, IT only supports the TCP/IP protocol. Other network protocols are not allowed. Requests for exceptions to the above requirements and policies will be reviewed on an individual basis in cases where critical need is impacted. However, first priorities are the security, integrity, and reliability of the campus network. Submit requests through the IT Help Desk's online service request form or by phone by calling ext. 8940.
Hello, Here are a few of the replies that I received: ________________________________ Max, I don't set policy here at Syracuse but I used to run the network group and I've worked pretty close with Lee Badman over the years. I remember the early years of wireless at SU when Lee was wrestling with this issue. It was a no-win situation and the only way to get people to stop deploying rogue AP's was to deploy a secure production wireless network, to take away the motivation. Of course, that took time and money. I now teach classes here at SU focused on wireless and we have been discussing this topic. My understanding of the law is that no University has the legal right to prohibit someone from using an unlicensed radio device as long as that device has been certified by the FCC. The FCC governs the public airwaves and Universities have no authority. However, in the case of traditional rogue APs/routers, a University can prevent these devices from being connected to its network or require users to remove them from its network. Where it gets trickier is the situation with personal Wi-Fi hotspots, which use 3G/4G as a the backhaul. My understanding is you cannot legally prohibit the use of these devices, even if they cause interference on your network. I have a team of students in my class who are evaluating these devices. We have discovered that at least some of them default to using Channel 2 in the 2.4 GHz band. This is a terrible situation if you are using a standard channel plan of 1-6-11. As you may know, the impact of adjacent channel interference (1-2) is actually worse than if both devices were on the same channel. I just thought I would share my thesis on this topic. I'd appreciate it if you could share any other insights you gain as it would be good background for my students. -- Dave Molta Associate Professor of Practice Director, Bachelor of Science, Information Management and Technology Director, Minor, Information Technology, Design, and Startup Syracuse University School of Information Studies ____________________________________________________ Hi, UCR's is here: http://fboapps.ucr.edu/policies/index.php?path=viewPolicies.php&policy=4... Thanks, --russ _____________________________________________________ Thanks, Max Lopez Senior Staff Authority for Wireless Office of Information Technology University of Colorado www.colorado.edu max.lopez@colorado.edu _____________________________________
One more: ____________________________ The University of Iowa has a couple of policies (http://cio.uiowa.edu/policy/) addressing this. IT-24 Wireless Networking is the most specific but IT-20 Airspace also helps. We also have statements prohibiting "extending the network" in several places including the Operations Manual. Thanks, Steve Steve-Troester@uiowa.edu
Message from jcoehoorn@york.edu

Thanks for the reminder that we technically have no authority over the radio spectrum, even in our own campuses. To add a wrinkle, Windows 7 ships with the ability to act as a wifi gateway. You can set up any PC with a wireless card to act as a router, without needing to install anything that didn't ship with the OS. Certainly linux (and macs by extension) have the same ability. Thankfully, this isn't common knowledge for most students, but it does make it trickier to craft a policy statement that prohibits rogue devices, when the rogue device may have double duty as the students' desktop, and this may itself be connected only via wifi. Sent from my iPad
Message from dannyeaton@rice.edu

thank you very much.  highly enlightening. 

Connected by Motorola


Max Lawrence Lopez <Max.Lopez@COLORADO.EDU> wrote:

One more:
____________________________

The University of Iowa has a couple of policies (http://cio.uiowa.edu/policy/) addressing this. IT-24 Wireless Networking is the most specific but IT-20 Airspace also helps. We also have statements prohibiting "extending the network" in several places including the Operations Manual.

Thanks, Steve
Steve-Troester@uiowa.edu

>Thanks for the reminder that we technically have no authority over the radio spectrum, even in our own campuses.

The key word here is "technically."  This is (yet) another case where we should let the lawyers be the lawyers. Don't let the FCC spook you. Go talk to your general counsel.

You have broad discretion in defining community standards. We often offer to stop taking someone's tuition. That is usually a good incentive in our environment. 

           
Rand
 
Rand P. Hall
Director, Network Services                 askIT!
Merrimack College
978-837-3532

If I had an hour to save the world, I would spend 59 minutes defining the problem and one minute finding solutions. – Einstein


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