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Keith, Sloan defines blended as anywhere between 30-79% online, so there is a pretty wide range. (I attached a document with the reference). The following are from a Blended Workshop I attended by Dr. Norman Vaughan

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1MZbe8xi-ckHjkkgJzEMKDB_JC2pNA4eFt2ZY7_vlp3Q/edit

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Ky_AEciMmKdbftEymD0lsZglX0uhA-DhPsMaXwvJOrI/edit

 

Patrice

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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Keith, 

You may also find this report from Next Generation Learning Challenges helpful. NGLC studied 10 different blended learning models and reported on its findings here: https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/attachment/u/0/s/?view=att&th=141bc8070f98149e&attid=0.3&disp=attd&safe=1&zw&saduie=AG9B_P80GJWbfSUO6noYi30kKLCY&sadet=1381894428530&sads=QxXpiNqD-B3ITHtNcSdzMQWhFL4

Good luck.
Emily



On Tuesday, October 15, 2013, Patrice Torcivia Prusko wrote:

Keith, Sloan defines blended as anywhere between 30-79% online, so there is a pretty wide range. (I attached a document with the reference). The following are from a Blended Workshop I attended by Dr. Norman Vaughan

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1MZbe8xi-ckHjkkgJzEMKDB_JC2pNA4eFt2ZY7_vlp3Q/edit

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Ky_AEciMmKdbftEymD0lsZglX0uhA-DhPsMaXwvJOrI/edit

 

Patrice

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.



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********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Thanks Patrice.  Are there any standards for quantifying the online component of blended courses to combine with the seat time of the face to face component to come up with these percentages?  Or do we just claim that e.g., 50% of the work is happening online?

For example, if we start with our typical format of two 100 minute class sessions each week for our 4 credit face to face courses, we could go to one 100 minute class session plus online work to claim a 50% blended course for 4 credits.  But it really depends on having some measure of the online component that can be compared to the 100 minute face to face session that is being eliminated each week.  Watching a 5 minute online video and answering a 10 question multiple choice quiz is presumably not enough online work to eliminate the one 100 minute face to face session each week and still justify this as a 4 credit course.

How do you determine how much online learning activity is needed to balance the loss of say 30%, 50% or 75% of the face time for a comparable face to face class, and still justify that the course merits the same number of credit hours?

If we had well defined learning outcomes and mapped the learning activities that students could/should do to demonstrate attainment of those outcomes in a competency-based framework, it wouldn't matter how much time a student was spending in class or working online.  As long as they accomplished the goals of the class.  But we're not there yet, certainly not on our campus.

Thx again, keith

keith landa, director
teaching, learning, and technology center
purchase college suny

Hi Keith, and all,

This is a great thread, thanks for posting, Keith, and others for participating!

I'll share this graphic that was designed here at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health by Tracy Thompson and vetted by our team to help show how learning activities might be distributed to in class, online, and homework time. It may be useful for others or foster more discussion:


In terms of determining how to quantify the amount of online work - it's fairly easy with lectures that are longer - or equivalent to the same amount in the classroom, but does get a little more blurry for the other activities. You just have to try to figure out what the approximate amount of time is which can be hard, as you know. I think a lot of times the first run may be somewhat experimental to get feedback from students about the amounts of time spent on various activities that are not lectures. 


Best,

Clark Shah-Nelson


Clark Shah-Nelson
clarkshahnelson@gmail.com
IM, Skype, Twitter: clarkshahnelson



Thanks Clark, this is very useful.

A follow-up question for the list.  We have fully online courses that we help faculty develop within the frameworks of Community of Inquiry, Quality Matters rubric, learning taxonomies (e.g., Bloom's, etc), promoting student engagement, etc.  Now that we are beginning to develop hybrid/blended courses offered by those same online instructors, I get a lot of "well, that's just my online course with a few face to face meetings thrown in".  I don't get the feeling that our faculty are very intentional about what learning activities best take advantage of the face to face component vs the online component of the blended courses.

I'm planning a workshop to look at the distinction between fully online courses and blended courses.  Do any of you have recommendations for articles in this area that would be good to share with faculty?  Thanks.  keith

keith landa, director
teaching, learning, and technology center
purchase college suny

On Oct 16, 2013, at 8:35 AM, Clark Shah-Nelson <clarkshahnelson@GMAIL.COM>
 wrote:

Hi Keith, and all,

This is a great thread, thanks for posting, Keith, and others for participating!

I'll share this graphic that was designed here at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health by Tracy Thompson and vetted by our team to help show how learning activities might be distributed to in class, online, and homework time. It may be useful for others or foster more discussion:


In terms of determining how to quantify the amount of online work - it's fairly easy with lectures that are longer - or equivalent to the same amount in the classroom, but does get a little more blurry for the other activities. You just have to try to figure out what the approximate amount of time is which can be hard, as you know. I think a lot of times the first run may be somewhat experimental to get feedback from students about the amounts of time spent on various activities that are not lectures. 


Best,

Clark Shah-Nelson


Clark Shah-Nelson
clarkshahnelson@gmail.com
IM, Skype, Twitter: clarkshahnelson



Hi Keith and all, 

I apologize the link I sent last night to the New Generation report on blended learning didn't work.  I attached the article (NG - Blended Learning).  I also attached a report & infographic from Educause Center of Analysis and Research that investigated student use patterns and perceptions of technology in the classroom. Good luck with the workshop. 

Emily


Hi Clark, Keith, and all,

Clark, your course comparison matrix is very helpful. In our faculty development activities and resources here at RIT we take an an approach that is similar to yours and de-emphasize the course mode (or course-delivery method) and focus instead on total time on task (by course and/or week). The New York State Department of Education takes this time-on-tas approach in its current policies for "distance education" (http://www.highered.nysed.gov/ocue/ded/policies.html). The relevant section is worth quoting in full:

Time on task is the total learning time spent by a student in a college course, including instructional time as well as time spent studying and completing course assignments (e.g., reading, research, writing, individual and group projects.) Regardless of the delivery method or the particular learning activities employed, the amount of learning time in any college course should meet the guideline of the Carnegie unit, a total of 45 hours for one semester credit (in conventional classroom education this breaks down into 15 hours of instruction plus 30 hours of student work/study out of class.)


"Instruction" is provided differently in online courses than in classroom-based courses. Despite the difference in methodology and activities, however, the total "learning time" online can usually be counted. Rather than try to distinguish between "in-class" and "outside-class" time for students, the faculty member developing and/or teaching the online course should calculate how much time a student doing satisfactory work would take to complete the work of the course, including:


·       reading course presentations/ "lectures"

·       reading other materials

·       participation in online discussions

·       doing research

·       writing papers or other assignments

·       completing all other assignments (e.g. Projects)


The total time spent on these tasks should be roughly equal to that spent on comparable tasks in a classroom-based course. Time spent downloading or uploading documents, troubleshooting technical problems, or in chat rooms (unless on course assignments such as group projects) should not be counted.


In determining the time on task for an online course, useful information include


·       the course objectives and expected learning outcomes

·       the list of topics in the course outline or syllabus; the textbooks, additional readings, and related education materials (such as software) required

·       statements in course materials informing students of the time and/or effort they are expected to devote to the course or individual parts of it

·       a listing of the pedagogical tools to be used in the online course, how each will be used, and the expectations for participation (e.g., in an online discussion, how many substantive postings will be required of a student for each week or unit?)


Theoretically, one should be able to measure any course, regardless of delivery method, by the description of content covered. However, this is difficult for anyone other than the course developer or instructor to determine accurately, since the same statement of content (in a course outline or syllabus) can represent many different levels of breadth and depth in the treatment of that content, and require widely varying amounts of time. 


From: Clark Shah-Nelson <clarkshahnelson@GMAIL.COM>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Wednesday, October 16, 2013 8:35 AM
To: "BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] calculating/justifying credit hours for blended learning model

Hi Keith, and all,

This is a great thread, thanks for posting, Keith, and others for participating!

I'll share this graphic that was designed here at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health by Tracy Thompson and vetted by our team to help show how learning activities might be distributed to in class, online, and homework time. It may be useful for others or foster more discussion:


In terms of determining how to quantify the amount of online work - it's fairly easy with lectures that are longer - or equivalent to the same amount in the classroom, but does get a little more blurry for the other activities. You just have to try to figure out what the approximate amount of time is which can be hard, as you know. I think a lot of times the first run may be somewhat experimental to get feedback from students about the amounts of time spent on various activities that are not lectures. 


Best,

Clark Shah-Nelson


Clark Shah-Nelson
clarkshahnelson@gmail.com
IM, Skype, Twitter: clarkshahnelson



Thank you, Emily! 

From: Emily Foote <emily@APPRENNET.COM>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Wednesday, October 16, 2013 8:19 AM
To: "BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [WARNING: MESSAGE ENCRYPTED]Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] calculating/justifying credit hours for blended learning model

Hi Keith and all, 

I apologize the link I sent last night to the New Generation report on blended learning didn't work.  I attached the article (NG - Blended Learning).  I also attached a report & infographic from Educause Center of Analysis and Research that investigated student use patterns and perceptions of technology in the classroom. Good luck with the workshop. 

Emily


Message from khbrow03@louisville.edu

This is great timing. On Monday, I found this article by Phil Ice and others at APUS called, “Quantifying Online Learning Contact Hours.” From the article: “APUS leaders developed the APUS Online Contact Hours Calculator to assist faculty and program directors with the assessment of total course contact hours. Core learning management system tools used to complete in-class and homework projects were apportioned time requirements toward contact hour calculations, thus streamlining the course review process, adhering to governmental and accreditation standards, and ensuring the overall quality and rigor of each online course.”

 

Has anyone seen this and applied it?

http://www.swosu.edu/academics/aij/2012/v2v2/powell-helm-layne-ice.pdf

 

Kristen Brown

Assistant Director for Online Learning

Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning

University of Louisville

p: 502.852.8565

e: kristen.brown@louisville.edu

http://louisville.edu/online

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Emily Foote
Sent: Wednesday, October 16, 2013 9:19 AM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] calculating/justifying credit hours for blended learning model

 

Hi Keith and all, 

 

I apologize the link I sent last night to the New Generation report on blended learning didn't work.  I attached the article (NG - Blended Learning).  I also attached a report & infographic from Educause Center of Analysis and Research that investigated student use patterns and perceptions of technology in the classroom. Good luck with the workshop. 

 

Emily

 

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