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Message from michelle.l.chandler@lonestar.edu

Dear Colleagues,

 

Apologies for the cross posting.

 

Our institution is currently in the process of revising our faculty certification and training required for all our faculty who will teach online. Currently, our training consists of synchronous LMS tool training (delivered via webinars) and an asynchronous online portion that requires, on average, two hours to complete.

 

After reviewing feedback from faculty and administration and researching certification programs at other institutions, we see there is a need for more robust preparation and training for our online faculty. Our goal is for this revamped training to be unique and innovative but also based on best practices, research, proven models, etc.

 

How is your institution preparing faculty to teach online? Particularly, what sort of training and/or certification does your institution offer its online faculty?

 

Any feedback is appreciated.

 

Michelle L. Chandler, MBA
Online Instructional Designer
Lone Star College-Online
Michelle.L.Chandler@LoneStar.Edu

281.318.4345 Phone

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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Message from michelle.l.chandler@lonestar.edu

Dear Colleagues,

 

Apologies for the cross posting.

 

Our institution is currently in the process of revising our faculty certification and training required for all our faculty who will teach online. Currently, our training consists of synchronous LMS tool training (delivered via webinars) and an asynchronous online portion that requires, on average, two hours to complete.

 

After reviewing feedback from faculty and administration and researching certification programs at other institutions, we see there is a need for more robust preparation and training for our online faculty. Our goal is for this revamped training to be unique and innovative but also based on best practices, research, proven models, etc.

 

How is your institution preparing faculty to teach online? Particularly, what sort of training and/or certification does your institution offer its online faculty?

 

Any feedback is appreciated.

 

Michelle L. Chandler, MBA
Online Instructional Designer
Lone Star College-Online
Michelle.L.Chandler@LoneStar.Edu

281.318.4345 Phone

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from michelle.l.chandler@lonestar.edu

Dear Colleagues,

 

Apologies for the cross posting.

 

Our institution is currently in the process of revising our faculty certification and training required for all our faculty who will teach online. Currently, our training consists of synchronous LMS tool training (delivered via webinars) and an asynchronous online portion that requires, on average, two hours to complete.

 

After reviewing feedback from faculty and administration and researching certification programs at other institutions, we see there is a need for more robust preparation and training for our online faculty. Our goal is for this revamped training to be unique and innovative but also based on best practices, research, proven models, etc.

 

How is your institution preparing faculty to teach online? Particularly, what sort of training and/or certification does your institution offer its online faculty?

 

Any feedback is appreciated.

 

Michelle L. Chandler, MBA
Online Instructional Designer
Lone Star College-Online
Michelle.L.Chandler@LoneStar.Edu

281.318.4345 Phone

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from michelle.l.chandler@lonestar.edu

Dear Colleagues,

 

Apologies for the cross posting.

 

Our institution is currently in the process of revising our faculty certification and training required for all our faculty who will teach online. Currently, our training consists of synchronous LMS tool training (delivered via webinars) and an asynchronous online portion that requires, on average, two hours to complete.

 

After reviewing feedback from faculty and administration and researching certification programs at other institutions, we see there is a need for more robust preparation and training for our online faculty. Our goal is for this revamped training to be unique and innovative but also based on best practices, research, proven models, etc.

 

How is your institution preparing faculty to teach online? Particularly, what sort of training and/or certification does your institution offer its online faculty?

 

Any feedback is appreciated.

 

Michelle L. Chandler, MBA
Online Instructional Designer
Lone Star College-Online
Michelle.L.Chandler@LoneStar.Edu

281.318.4345 Phone

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Here is a brochure on our faculty development options.  You can find more information at:  http://teach.ucf.edu/professional-development/

 

Michelle, I would be happy to discuss details of our program.

 

Linda S. Futch, Ed.D.

Associate Department Head, Instructional Design

Center for Distributed Learning

University of Central Florida

4000 Central Florida Blvd, Lib 107

Orlando  FL 32816-2810

linda.futch@ucf.edu

407-882-0028

 

 

 

Sorry for taking so long to reply. There is a lot to say about this issue.

Here at Granite State College, our undergraduate faculty are all adjunct. Enrollment is comprised mostly of adult learners completing a degree, and over 50% of enrollment in online courses. We just launched our graduate programs last year, and recently completed a full migration from Blackboard to Moodle.

Academic Affairs and Ed. Tech have been working together to identify the areas of PD needed to be credentialed for teaching online. Here is what we have discovered (and you will hear "three tiers" a lot. Just a warning ;-):
  • There are cultural factors to consider when communicating to adjunct faculty/SMEs – some of whom have been teaching for many years – that they need to somehow meet some kind of approval from AA in order to be credentialed (and to explain what "credentialed" means in terms of performance review). We are challenged with articulating that teaching online is unique, and that developing a course for online learning requires an expanded set of skills beyond traditional teaching methods. There have been mixed responses to this, but mostly positive.
  • There was a great deal of discussion about whether "grading the teacher" on their online course development would be met with resistance (and possible flight), and whether there ought to be hard or soft requirements that must be met in order to teach online. We have developed, tentatively, a rating system that AA applies to each course during its development phase, with "traffic lights" on certain factors that cue a conversation. I am not directly involved with this discourse, so I cannot attest to how faculty have received this practice or whether it is continuing.
  • We have recognized that there are three tiers of faculty proficiency in developing and teaching an online course: (1) New faculty who are new to Moodle and to teaching online; (2) Initiated faculty (who passed our 4-wk teaching with Moodle course) who need occasional technical assistance, and need guidance and oversight with course development/teaching online; (3) Faculty who are mostly independent in both technical and pedagogical aspects. We have systems in place to serve faculty at each of these levels but we need more formal research to document all of the skills and sub-skills encompassed in our concept of credentialing. For example, we could qualify each of these levels with specific skills, or create, say, a Top 50 list, designate 5 of them as foundation/critical skills, and then rate one's level according to having achieved a certain percentage of the rest, regardless of what is remaining (aside from the critical 5). More discussion is forthcoming on this. 
  • We have struggled with our model of expecting faculty to develop their own online course versus having exclusively ID staff developing the courses and simply hiring faculty to teach. We now recognize that there are three tiers of proficiency in our course development goal: (1) Faculty who can simply teach what they are given to teach, but cannot/will not develop the course much beyond that; (2) Faculty who can be given a course and then elaborate or modify it to their preferences or needs; (3) Faculty who can create a course from scratch. Naturally, our ID staffing would need to be rethought if we were to accommodate this model. We have initiated a PD model for elevating faculty to Level 3 proficiency, which would include ongoing cycles of awareness, introduction, instruction, authentic practice, feedback & improvement, peer-to-peer community building, and showcasing exemplary work. This model could be applied to many other facets of teaching online, such as…
  • We have introduced rich media into this mix as a teaching strategy, which has, in itself, levels of proficiency: (1) Foundation theories of teaching online with non-text media, and curating appropriate content; (2) Curating media and manipulating it in some way to shape it as needed; (3) Creating media as needed. We have published a series of videos (where you can see what I look like ;-) that introduce these concepts and models both internally on Kaltura (within our Moodle PD course), and on our YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4060FF40A65CF1C5&feature=plcp  These videos and a parallel webinar version are preludes to in-person workshops where faculty can work on authentic situations with peers and an instructor (as described in the model above).
  • We have recognized that promoting faculty PD for teaching online must be coordinated in some way with academic coaches and student success teams. If we promote certain principles and practice for online teaching, we ought to promote those same principles as characteristics of online learning, and then support students to be successful at them. We have yet to have a "big" discussion about what this means, but it points to an area of attention needed for GSC to be perceived by students as "The place to learn online".
  • We have not discussed incentives for our (busy, part-time, working other jobs) faculty to advance to higher levels of proficiency. This is a major topic. On one hand, teachers need to earn a living, and if the recent article in the Chronicle is any indication, adjunct faculty seem to be willing to put up with a lot of "imbalance" in order to make ends meet. But we also realize that GSC wants to be a national leader in online learning, and in order to do that, there must be both intrinsic and financial incentives for better instructors (or those who wish to be) to work with us – all while retaining the value proposition for our students and serving our local communities. The greatest risk in our longterm efforts is that we will be seen as a commodity, with little differentiating value to the customer, unless the points of contact with them are valuable, engaging, supportive, and most of all positively distinguishable from our competition. No doubt, most of you have read the recent WIRED Magazine article? It's hard to take this article as gospel, but my previous career in broadcast production has been an appropriate model of the potential bloodletting that can occur within highly established industries – in a very short period of time, I might add!
Whew! That was lot! Hope you all made it through to the end. Thank you for reading.

- Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist
Granite State College
8 Old Suncook Road
Concord, NH 03301
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate
Scheduling: tungle.me/steve.granitestate




From: "Chandler, Michelle L" <Michelle.L.Chandler@LONESTAR.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2012 17:31:34 -0500
To: <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [BLEND-ONLINE] Certifying Faculty to Teach Online

Dear Colleagues,

 

Apologies for the cross posting.

 

Our institution is currently in the process of revising our faculty certification and training required for all our faculty who will teach online. Currently, our training consists of synchronous LMS tool training (delivered via webinars) and an asynchronous online portion that requires, on average, two hours to complete.

 

After reviewing feedback from faculty and administration and researching certification programs at other institutions, we see there is a need for more robust preparation and training for our online faculty. Our goal is for this revamped training to be unique and innovative but also based on best practices, research, proven models, etc.

 

How is your institution preparing faculty to teach online? Particularly, what sort of training and/or certification does your institution offer its online faculty?

 

Any feedback is appreciated.

 

Michelle L. Chandler, MBA
Online Instructional Designer
Lone Star College-Online
Michelle.L.Chandler@LoneStar.Edu

281.318.4345 Phone

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from arbogasts@middlesex.mass.edu

Michelle

At Middlesex Community College, we require all new faculty to go through an 8-wek course on online pedagogy and the LMS. Then our eLearning manager must approve of the courses structure then have the dean/department chair approve of the courses content before the course can be taught online.

Sanford Arbogast

Academic Technology Analyst

Middlesex Community College

 

Message from crystalx@verizon.net

Sanford,

This sounds interesting; I was wondering if I could discuss this program with you. I doing my doctoral thesis as to whether self-efficacy can be increased through on-line education. May I talk with you about this?

Thank you.

Gary Gomes

On 4/6/2012 11:28 AM, Sanford Arbogast wrote:

Michelle

At Middlesex Community College, we require all new faculty to go through an 8-wek course on online pedagogy and the LMS. Then our eLearning manager must approve of the courses structure then have the dean/department chair approve of the courses content before the course can be taught online.

Sanford Arbogast

Academic Technology Analyst

Middlesex Community College

 

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