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Hi all,

In this short video, Sir John Daniels lays out his 3 trends to watch: shift from public HE to private for-profit, OER, and mobile learning.
I found the first section most interesting - the idea that there is higher quality in for-profit online learning due to division of labor and specialization.  It seems like most of the press on for-profits in this realm has been on enrollment strategies and financial aid issues rather than the actual quality of the end product - courses and degrees. Do you agree that having individual faculty members handle most aspects of online courses results in low economy of scale and inconsistency in quality? Are there models for course and degree development in some of your institutions which address such concerns?




Best,
Clark


Clark Shah-Nelson
Sr. Instructional Designer, CTLT
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Hey Clark (and everyone)

Great video and there's no arguing that these trends (scalable online programs mastered by for-profits, open educational resources for repurposing, and mobile technologies reshaping how/when we learn) but I'd argue there is an even more perfect storm brewing that's shaking up our long held institutions (industry). There's also:

* MOOCs - Massive Online Open Courses (and soon full programs) -- more than for-profits have mastered online courses, the MOOC movement (George Siemens, Sebastian Thurn formerly at Stanford now at Audacity, Coursera - Stanfords rush to compete with Audacity, Udemy, etc.) have really figured out the design of scaling courses to almost 100,000 students while maintaining high quality. It's real. 

* Big Data, Learning Analytics, and Predictive Analytics -- For the last decade, we all have 'saved money' at the grocery store using our club card which is basically the grocer paying us for our data so they can more effectively target market segments, manage inventory and distribution, mitigate risk, forecast, and develop new business strategies. This is starting to take off in education where we have systems that track student activity, profiles, etc. While there's all sorts of ethical issues involved, there is enormous opportunity to empower faculty and institutions to be more responsive to student learning needs, enrollment trends, but this will no doubt reshape educational strategies (and empower those who have the data analytics figured out.) 

* New Credentialing and/or Digital Badges - one reason universities have not changed while every other knowledge-based industry has turned upside down is because we've long held a monopoly in our closed system on credentialing (i.e. degrees.) But a new system that opens not just educational resources (OER) but also credentials that employers can really use. Right now, most employers still don't know what their new employees know or can do, because degrees are too inconsistent from institution to institution. So they've had to rely on name brand (ivy league hires only), their own assessments, or luck. Badges will break it down to demonstrable competencies which degrades the value of a degree. 

* Edupreneurs and Startups - In 2009, when we all were still crying in our beers about the economy, budget cuts (state schools), and shrinking enrollments (private schools), educational startups were reeling in record amounts of venture capital to unapologetically disrupt higher ed. In 2011, over $429-million venture capital sunk into new education startups. 

* Consumerization - we've all seen what the consumerization of IT has done -- where new vendors and service providers go straight to the consumer, skipping over an organization's IT department who long had control over what technology everyone in that organization used. Well, that's now happening with teaching and learning -- thanks to all these new startups. Universities have long had control over what students need to learn. But just like empowered consumers with affordable and powerful technology who ask "who needs our IT division'", the same consumers will soon be empowered by the startups who provide affordable yet high quality learning and credentials asking "who needs the university." 

* New Online Economies - We're all familiar with the new online platforms that help people help each other (and make money from the connections and transactions) -- craigslist, facebook, ebay, airbnb, yelp, etc. The same is starting to happen with education. The truth of the matter is there's more than just faculty in the world who are experts (or expert enough) to help people learn. Also, digital goods (video lectures, online assessments, etc) unlike material goods, do not follow the standard supply and demand models. They can be replicated and shared in scale without depleting inventory or devaluation. So the whole economics of online learning is vastly different when developed in a networked platform -- which is what 90% of the startups are. Online economies disrupting traditional models are analogous to quantumd physics did to newtonian physics. Perhaps the traditional models will still exist in a limited space, just like newtonian laws are not defunked, they're just vastly limited. 

If any of this is of interest to you, there's not a day that goes by where something's not hitting the news. I'm curating a site devoted to these disruptive trends you're welcome to follow:

Happy Monday.
Susan 


Susan – I subscribe to your scoop.it so I will attest to its value.

I am relatively new to the business of higher education, but I arrived here from an industry that has already gone through a great deal of upheaval due to the kinds of disruptions described here, and other factors (affordable powerful computers, inexpensive and powerful software, shifts away from TV to online communication). That is, broadcast production and post-production.

Without recounting the gory collapse of elite video editing facilities with $125,000 per-seat editing systems (that only we had), I will say here that the industry responses to these changes were diverse. Around 2001, a partner and I realized that we needed to shape a new business model that would survive whatever changes we were aware of, and those we could not.

The (counterintuitive) answer was to focus on talent – not technology. We were well aware that all of our clients could buy everything we already owned, and had the capacity to out-geek us in IT and communication infrastructure. What they didn't have was "us". We were able to make sense of the workflows, the methods for planning and execution, and then how to extend the client's experience beyond the "gig" and into ways to re-purpose their content for multiple platforms. Long story short, nearly every TV business I worked with or knew about in the 1990s and early 2000s is gone  – yet the one founded by my partner and myself carries on now, 10 tumultuous years and still focusing on talent:  digitaldoublewide.com

The point is here is that I wish we would all acknowledge that the tools and technologies in front of us will evolve beyond anything we can imagine, but teaching will remain an area of skill and knowledge that simply cannot be commodified. The human condition requires leadership in teaching in the modern milieu, with the greatest talent among us enduring it all.


- Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist
Granite State College
8 Old Suncook Road
Concord, NH 03301
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate
Scheduling: tungle.me/steve.granitestate

 

From: Susan Gautsch <susan.gautsch@PEPPERDINE.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2012 09:50:36 -0700
To: <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Interesting video: Three Developments That Are Transforming Online Learning

Hey Clark (and everyone)

Great video and there's no arguing that these trends (scalable online programs mastered by for-profits, open educational resources for repurposing, and mobile technologies reshaping how/when we learn) but I'd argue there is an even more perfect storm brewing that's shaking up our long held institutions (industry). There's also:

* MOOCs - Massive Online Open Courses (and soon full programs) -- more than for-profits have mastered online courses, the MOOC movement (George Siemens, Sebastian Thurn formerly at Stanford now at Audacity, Coursera - Stanfords rush to compete with Audacity, Udemy, etc.) have really figured out the design of scaling courses to almost 100,000 students while maintaining high quality. It's real. 

* Big Data, Learning Analytics, and Predictive Analytics -- For the last decade, we all have 'saved money' at the grocery store using our club card which is basically the grocer paying us for our data so they can more effectively target market segments, manage inventory and distribution, mitigate risk, forecast, and develop new business strategies. This is starting to take off in education where we have systems that track student activity, profiles, etc. While there's all sorts of ethical issues involved, there is enormous opportunity to empower faculty and institutions to be more responsive to student learning needs, enrollment trends, but this will no doubt reshape educational strategies (and empower those who have the data analytics figured out.) 

* New Credentialing and/or Digital Badges - one reason universities have not changed while every other knowledge-based industry has turned upside down is because we've long held a monopoly in our closed system on credentialing (i.e. degrees.) But a new system that opens not just educational resources (OER) but also credentials that employers can really use. Right now, most employers still don't know what their new employees know or can do, because degrees are too inconsistent from institution to institution. So they've had to rely on name brand (ivy league hires only), their own assessments, or luck. Badges will break it down to demonstrable competencies which degrades the value of a degree. 

* Edupreneurs and Startups - In 2009, when we all were still crying in our beers about the economy, budget cuts (state schools), and shrinking enrollments (private schools), educational startups were reeling in record amounts of venture capital to unapologetically disrupt higher ed. In 2011, over $429-million venture capital sunk into new education startups. 

* Consumerization - we've all seen what the consumerization of IT has done -- where new vendors and service providers go straight to the consumer, skipping over an organization's IT department who long had control over what technology everyone in that organization used. Well, that's now happening with teaching and learning -- thanks to all these new startups. Universities have long had control over what students need to learn. But just like empowered consumers with affordable and powerful technology who ask "who needs our IT division'", the same consumers will soon be empowered by the startups who provide affordable yet high quality learning and credentials asking "who needs the university." 

* New Online Economies - We're all familiar with the new online platforms that help people help each other (and make money from the connections and transactions) -- craigslist, facebook, ebay, airbnb, yelp, etc. The same is starting to happen with education. The truth of the matter is there's more than just faculty in the world who are experts (or expert enough) to help people learn. Also, digital goods (video lectures, online assessments, etc) unlike material goods, do not follow the standard supply and demand models. They can be replicated and shared in scale without depleting inventory or devaluation. So the whole economics of online learning is vastly different when developed in a networked platform -- which is what 90% of the startups are. Online economies disrupting traditional models are analogous to quantumd physics did to newtonian physics. Perhaps the traditional models will still exist in a limited space, just like newtonian laws are not defunked, they're just vastly limited. 

If any of this is of interest to you, there's not a day that goes by where something's not hitting the news. I'm curating a site devoted to these disruptive trends you're welcome to follow:

Happy Monday.
Susan 


Thank you, Susan for the insightful post - and link to your disruptive trends site!(http://www.scoop.it/t/higher-education-disrupted-or-disruptor-your-choice) I was looking for an RSS feed to subscribe to. Does it exist?)

Regarding MOOCs, I recently saw another acronym I'm fond of: MOOS (where s = seminar) :)

Your post brought this fairly recent article from The Wall Street Journal to mind:

I found it particularly interesting that Udacity (note, not the audio editor, Audacity :) rewarded the top 200 performing students by forwarding their resumés to several major companies. 

I'm glad you put a figure to the educational startups - this is fascinating and should drive much innovation. 

Best,
Clark



Clark Shah-Nelson
Sr. Instructional Designer, CTLT
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health



Message from jolinfield@gmail.com

Fantastic summary, thanks Susan! - Jo Meyertons

Thanks for the WSJ article, Clark. And great topic to bring up with us all. 

Like the MOOS ... I know folks at Georgia Tech are doing interesting things in that regard. 

and yes, the increased attention on employment as (one of) the ROI's of students' time and money is a key ingredient. 

Steve Covello: I think you're so right on the mark with the enduring and even increased value in teaching excellence. Being one of the 60,000+ students in Dave Evans and Sebastian Thrun's CS101 MOOC, one of the things that makes this course so successful is these guys understand teaching -- their personable in their videos, they know their stuff (globally recognized experts), they're responsive to questions (making videos with their TA answering the most popular questions posted), they're human (sometimes making mistakes, but owning it and doing their best to quickly rectify.) So yes, I do believe the really excellent teachers will be the ones who rise to the top quickly! 

lastly, sorry for all my thinking/typing-too-quick typos and senseless sentences. Jeez, just reread my post. 

Happy Tuesday all. 
Susan 









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Hello Folks, I am working on a doctoral dissertation for Northeastern University. It would be a case study on whether blended learning can enhance student self-efficacy. I had heard from some schools in Massachusetts that may be interested in collaborating; however, I lost the contact information. I had heard from two community colleges. I live in New Bedford, MA, so somewhere close by would be great. I am sorry to bother the list with this. I do need to get moving on my study. Thank you all very much! Gary Gomes ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
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