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Hi everyone!

In our faculty development program, several instructors have been asking about specific resources or strategies that would be helpful in designing an online or blended course for a shortened term, like in the summer. Turning a 16-week course into an 8-week (or less) course can definitely be a challenge, and even though we have some advice to offer, I'm looking for more ideas.

Do you all have any recommendations that I could pass along?

Thanks!

Dylan

***********
Dylan Barth
Learning Technology Consultant
University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
Learning Technology Center, GML E175
djbarth@uwm.edu | 414-229-4319 | @dylanbarth

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

  1. Google "accelerated learning," "accelerated degree completion," and "compressed courses." 
  2. Search the POD listserv archive for these topics, if you subscribe to it. If you don't, you will want to! http://listserv.nd.edu/archives/pod.html
  3. If the course is blended and the face-to-face class times are extended (3-5 hours, for example), you might find our blog discussion topic valuable:  http://15ideasteachingevening.blogspot.com/   Per blog protocols, the last post is the first one that you will see when going to that URL, so to get an intro to this blog, scroll down to the bottom of the page and click the "Older posts" button and then scroll down again to read the first introductory post and all (11) subsequent ones bottom to top. We've gotten lots of positive feedback to this discussion on teaching evening and extended-time classes.
  4. Check out the book Teaching Intensive and Accelerated Courses (Wlodkowski and Ginsberg). I was a bit disappointed with this, not that it has poor info, but that it didn't have much info specifically directed at the accelerated course, but you might want to order through interlibrary loan to capture bits and pieces.
  5. I also have a biblio. on compressed courses assembled by Linda Nilson in about 2010 (Clemson Univ, Center for Teaching Effectiveness), but can't seem to locate the electronic version on her site or my hard drive right now.  


Length of Online Course and Student Satisfaction, Perceived Learning, and Academic Performance
Hi Dylan,

My group at RIT has been tasked with a similar project. For ideas about designing and teaching "short" (also called intensive, accelerated, or compressed) online and blended cources, I highly recommend the attached three articles.

The first—Scott_2003_Attributes of Intensive Courses.pdf—is one of the most cited articles on developing intensive courses in any mode. It's a great article to use in a faculty development workshop.


Regarding online intensive course design, one of the most useful/informative articles is the Chen_2007_Design Strategies for Intensive Online Courses.pdf. Abstract: “Due to the time constraints of intensive online courses, instructional design strategies should be modified in order to retain the quality of learning without reducing the quantity of the course content. This paper presents how a blended approach combining objectivist and constructivist instructional strategies was used in the design of an intensive summer online course in the context of a support-based online learning environment. The implementation results revealed that students had a positive learning experience in the course and were highly satisfied with their learning outcomes.”

 

Ferguson_2010_Length of Online Courses and Academic Performance.pdf is a close second to the Chen article in terms of designing and teaching intensive online and blended courses; it’s also a relatively recent article. According to the authors, “This research has broken new ground in the study of online learning in that it is the first to explore how different formats (full-semester versus five-week shortened courses) influence student attitudes and academic performance.”


Best of luck with your project!


Michael


Michael Starenko | Instructional Design Researcher & Consultant | Teaching & Learning Studio
Wallace 05-A654 | Rochester Institute of Technology | 585.475.5035 | mssetc@rit.edu





From: Dylan Barth <djbarth@UWM.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, April 29, 2013 12:24 PM
To: "BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [BLEND-ONLINE] Resources and Strategies for Online Teaching in the Summer

Hi everyone!

In our faculty development program, several instructors have been asking about specific resources or strategies that would be helpful in designing an online or blended course for a shortened term, like in the summer. Turning a 16-week course into an 8-week (or less) course can definitely be a challenge, and even though we have some advice to offer, I'm looking for more ideas.

Do you all have any recommendations that I could pass along?

Thanks!

Dylan

***********
Dylan Barth
Learning Technology Consultant
University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
Learning Technology Center, GML E175
djbarth@uwm.edu | 414-229-4319 | @dylanbarth

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Thank you Molly, Michael, and Edwige! In a review of these materials, it seems that the research indicates that much of what makes an online course successful is what also makes a shortened course successful: backward design focusing on learning objectives; student-centered, active learning; frequent, low-stakes assessments; managing student expectations; etc. I'll pass these ideas along. Your help is much-appreciated!

Take care,

Dylan

***********
Dylan Barth
Learning Technology Consultant
University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
Learning Technology Center, GML E175
djbarth@uwm.edu | 414-229-4319 | @dylanbarth


Thank you Molly, Michael, and Edwige! In a review of these materials, it seems that the research indicates that much of what makes an online course successful is what also makes a shortened course successful: backward design focusing on learning objectives; student-centered, active learning; frequent, low-stakes assessments; managing student expectations; etc. I'll pass these ideas along. Your help is much-appreciated!

Take care,

Dylan

***********
Dylan Barth
Learning Technology Consultant
University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
Learning Technology Center, GML E175
djbarth@uwm.edu | 414-229-4319 | @dylanbarth


Thank you Molly, Michael, and Edwige! In a review of these materials, it seems that the research indicates that much of what makes an online course successful is what also makes a shortened course successful: backward design focusing on learning objectives; student-centered, active learning; frequent, low-stakes assessments; managing student expectations; etc. I'll pass these ideas along. Your help is much-appreciated!

Take care,

Dylan

***********
Dylan Barth
Learning Technology Consultant
University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
Learning Technology Center, GML E175
djbarth@uwm.edu | 414-229-4319 | @dylanbarth


Thank you Molly, Michael, and Edwige! In a review of these materials, it seems that the research indicates that much of what makes an online course successful is what also makes a shortened course successful: backward design focusing on learning objectives; student-centered, active learning; frequent, low-stakes assessments; managing student expectations; etc. I'll pass these ideas along. Your help is much-appreciated!

Take care,

Dylan

***********
Dylan Barth
Learning Technology Consultant
University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
Learning Technology Center, GML E175
djbarth@uwm.edu | 414-229-4319 | @dylanbarth


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