Main Nav

Message from khbrow03@louisville.edu

Greetings all.

 

I’m writing to see if any of you know how your university or campus tracks online students in PeopleSoft, e.g. does a student select an online program upon application or are they defined as online students after they have been admitted and if so, how?

 

If you could point me to the right person to discuss this with, I’d greatly appreciate it. We are looking to do it differently here at University of Louisville so I want to see how others are doing this first.

 

Best regards,

Kristen

 

 

Kristen Brown
Assistant Director for Online Learning
Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning
University of Louisville
p: (502) 852-8565
e: kristen.brown@louisville.edu

http://louisville.edu/online

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Just curious: what's the distinction between 'online students' and 'students in online courses'?
I would think you could collect the data on students defined the second way almost automatically from enrollment records?

Glenn Everett, PhD
Pembroke, MA
gseverett1@gmail.com
781-293-5857
617-688-2102
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/geverett
Blog:  http://gseverett1.wordpress.com/


Message from khbrow03@louisville.edu

Great question, Glenn. I should have been more explicit up front.

 

The key to what I’m looking for are students who are enrolled in the online programs we offer. Because some of our programs are not 100% (using the 80% rule here), there are students who may be enrolled in an on-campus course but would be considered an “online student” if they were enrolled in one of our online programs. However, because we don’t have unique program / plan codes for our online programs, we cannot effectively track them. We had thought of creating unique plan codes for the online programs, but we are exploring other options since there is some resistance to do this here. That is still my preference, but I’m trying to make sure I know what others are doing to make my case or to find an alternate solution that will be efficient and accurate.

 

We have reports that will tell us who is taking only online courses (as well as other reports) to get a sense of this population, but when it comes to answering the question, “How many unique online students do you have?” we cannot use the course enrollment since these students may or may not be enrolled in online courses (and the opposite is true if an online student took only a f2f course one term).

 

Thanks,

Kristen

 

 

Kristen Brown
Assistant Director for Online Learning
Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning
University of Louisville
p: (502) 852-8565
e: kristen.brown@louisville.edu

http://louisville.edu/online

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of G Everett
Sent: Monday, January 09, 2012 1:39 PM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] tracking online students in PeopleSoft

 

Just curious: what's the distinction between 'online students' and 'students in online courses'?
I would think you could collect the data on students defined the second way almost automatically from enrollment records?

Glenn Everett, PhD
Pembroke, MA
gseverett1@gmail.com
781-293-5857
617-688-2102
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/geverett
Blog:  http://gseverett1.wordpress.com/

Your questions raise issues which stretch from the administrative to the pedagogical.

Although I well understand the interest in classifying courses, and the students taking them, into f2f, blended, hybrid, online w/ synchronous elements, completely asynchronous, (and etc?), I can also understand the resistance to being typecast ahead of time.
As a faculty member, why would I want to be restricted to one and only one pedagogical mode?
As a student, I might *greatly prefer* one mode (don't the annual surveys show Blended as the perennial winner?), and I might find one mode (Online-Asynchronous) the only one practical for me, but apart from cost, why choose to be restricted to one and only one mode of instruction?

Now we're down to the nitty gritty.  Many institutions do in fact have different registration tracks, waiving certain (on-campus) fees for online or distant students.  But the distinction here to be accurate, should be whether or not the students are in residence, or close enough to participate in campus activities, not which mode they choose for their courses.

Still, there are a couple of compelling arguments for unique course codes.  Surely the registrar already insists on knowing whether or not a classroom must be scheduled? So some sort of coding must exist.
Then, how do students choose courses?  Unique coding communicates to students before registration which delivery mode will be used.  And although faculty might want all delivery options at the planning stage, most would recognize that they should not change the mode once course registration starts.

And given the increased use of both business and academic analytics, I would suspect that more sophisticated course coding is becoming a necessity.

Can any readers at those institutions well advanced in using analytics tell us if they have any way of classifying courses AFTER registration--that is, using something other than course codes?

Glenn Everett, PhD
Pembroke, MA
gseverett1@gmail.com
781-293-5857
617-688-2102
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/geverett
Blog:  http://gseverett1.wordpress.com/


I have stayed out of this because we don’t use PeopleSoft, but I think the issues cut across software. There are several attributes to be coded: students, courses, sections, programs. I got the idea from an AACRAO document about ten years ago that Registrars believe there should be nothing on a transcript (i.e. in a course title or number) to indicate delivery method. A course is a course, regardless. Sections, however, need to be coded so students know what they are getting into and so institutional research folks can provide data about the extent of online teaching (as Glenn indicates below). It may help all your conversations to be clear when you are speaking about sections vs. when you are speaking about courses. I once heard an associate registrar explain that courses are what students get credit for and classes are what they attend. I try to make that distinction in my own communications but I’m not sure how widespread it is.

 

We implemented section codes for online and blended a couple of years ago—they were already built into Banner, and all we had to do was agree on what each label meant and train those creating sections in Banner to use them correctly. In fact, I think there are three different places in Banner where delivery type may be specified. So you might see what PeopleSoft already has built-in, whether your institution uses it or not.

 

Students typically are coded by the program (major) they are pursuing, as well as admission status, state of residency, etc. We are now looking for a way to identify fully online students, again as Glenn suggests, to help with waiving on-campus fees and assessing distance learning fees. We are just beginning to think about how to do that, so I’m open to suggestions and examples. One sister institution in the state has a Banner script that looks at student’s course load for all online classes and then looks at address and if outside a certain limit, the student is coded as fully online. Sounds great, but isn’t fool-proof.

 

We are also now looking at program codes distinguishing the online version of a baccalaureate completion program from the campus-based one. We think this is necessary because we don’t want students admitted to the online program to get all the usual new student info about housing, orientation, etc.

 

There is no easy automated way to identify a student who is taking/hast taken all of his or her courses online. Counting students in fully online programs may be the best approximation. Databases are powerful things, but sometimes they make my head hurt. Good luck, Kristen!

 

Peg Wherry

Director of Online and Distance Learning

Extended University Montana State University

128 EPS Building, P. O. Box 173860

Bozeman, MT 59717-3860

Tel (406) 994-6685

Fax (406) 994-7856

margaret.wherry@montana.edu

http://eu.montana.edu

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of G Everett
Sent: Monday, January 09, 2012 1:43 PM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] tracking online students in PeopleSoft

 

Your questions raise issues which stretch from the administrative to the pedagogical.

Although I well understand the interest in classifying courses, and the students taking them, into f2f, blended, hybrid, online w/ synchronous elements, completely asynchronous, (and etc?), I can also understand the resistance to being typecast ahead of time.
As a faculty member, why would I want to be restricted to one and only one pedagogical mode?
As a student, I might *greatly prefer* one mode (don't the annual surveys show Blended as the perennial winner?), and I might find one mode (Online-Asynchronous) the only one practical for me, but apart from cost, why choose to be restricted to one and only one mode of instruction?

Now we're down to the nitty gritty.  Many institutions do in fact have different registration tracks, waiving certain (on-campus) fees for online or distant students.  But the distinction here to be accurate, should be whether or not the students are in residence, or close enough to participate in campus activities, not which mode they choose for their courses.

Still, there are a couple of compelling arguments for unique course codes.  Surely the registrar already insists on knowing whether or not a classroom must be scheduled? So some sort of coding must exist.
Then, how do students choose courses?  Unique coding communicates to students before registration which delivery mode will be used.  And although faculty might want all delivery options at the planning stage, most would recognize that they should not change the mode once course registration starts.

And given the increased use of both business and academic analytics, I would suspect that more sophisticated course coding is becoming a necessity.

Can any readers at those institutions well advanced in using analytics tell us if they have any way of classifying courses AFTER registration--that is, using something other than course codes?

Glenn Everett, PhD
Pembroke, MA
gseverett1@gmail.com
781-293-5857
617-688-2102
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/geverett
Blog:  http://gseverett1.wordpress.com/

Message from khbrow03@louisville.edu

Peg,

Thanks for your thorough response. Yes, at UofL we track the sections as online but only by the location field and it is not on the transcript. We can easily identify which students are enrolled in the online sections but our need is to know who the online students are in terms of their programs. To me, using the program codes is the cleanest way (this is how we did it at University of Illinois at Chicago) having worked in an environment where this was the practice.

 

To your points, Glenn, our students are not typecast, rather, they are showing a preference so we know how to serve them and because we need to be able to track retention; SACS requires this. We need to provide them services (just as the students in the online courses, whether they are online students, need support services as well). Students are definitely able to take courses in either format; they are not restricted, though when there are limitations in class sizes, online students will get priority for the online courses and vice versa, but this doesn’t happen often. We need to look at the data and try and understand what our students are doing. Are they enrolled in online programs but choosing to blend their program? That is interesting, but we can’t know that unless they are identified as online somehow.

 

At this point, my goal is to try and get a sense of what the best practice is for tracking online students so I can work with the registrar’s office on a solution to implement. Peg, we had discussed running a script in PeopleSoft that looked at whether students selected a program that is offered online (though it’s not coded as online) and if they checked the box that says, “I want to complete my degree online,” then they’d be coded as online. We have that box now but students will check it regardless if their degree is available online. So it’s interesting to collect it; it’s showing us demand. If our team doesn’t want to create program codes for online programs, then it would be good to have the choices of programs the student applies to be restricted to only those offered online if the student selects the box that says they want to complete the degree online.

 

We aren’t classifying anything as blended right now, though I imagine we will in the future, though in the future, won’t all our degrees be blended to some degree?

 

Signing off for now.

Kristen

 

 

Kristen Brown
Assistant Director for Online Learning
Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning
University of Louisville
p: (502) 852-8565
e: kristen.brown@louisville.edu

http://louisville.edu/online

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Wherry, Peg
Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 11:09 AM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] tracking online students in PeopleSoft

 

I have stayed out of this because we don’t use PeopleSoft, but I think the issues cut across software. There are several attributes to be coded: students, courses, sections, programs. I got the idea from an AACRAO document about ten years ago that Registrars believe there should be nothing on a transcript (i.e. in a course title or number) to indicate delivery method. A course is a course, regardless. Sections, however, need to be coded so students know what they are getting into and so institutional research folks can provide data about the extent of online teaching (as Glenn indicates below). It may help all your conversations to be clear when you are speaking about sections vs. when you are speaking about courses. I once heard an associate registrar explain that courses are what students get credit for and classes are what they attend. I try to make that distinction in my own communications but I’m not sure how widespread it is.

 

We implemented section codes for online and blended a couple of years ago—they were already built into Banner, and all we had to do was agree on what each label meant and train those creating sections in Banner to use them correctly. In fact, I think there are three different places in Banner where delivery type may be specified. So you might see what PeopleSoft already has built-in, whether your institution uses it or not.

 

Students typically are coded by the program (major) they are pursuing, as well as admission status, state of residency, etc. We are now looking for a way to identify fully online students, again as Glenn suggests, to help with waiving on-campus fees and assessing distance learning fees. We are just beginning to think about how to do that, so I’m open to suggestions and examples. One sister institution in the state has a Banner script that looks at student’s course load for all online classes and then looks at address and if outside a certain limit, the student is coded as fully online. Sounds great, but isn’t fool-proof.

 

We are also now looking at program codes distinguishing the online version of a baccalaureate completion program from the campus-based one. We think this is necessary because we don’t want students admitted to the online program to get all the usual new student info about housing, orientation, etc.

 

There is no easy automated way to identify a student who is taking/hast taken all of his or her courses online. Counting students in fully online programs may be the best approximation. Databases are powerful things, but sometimes they make my head hurt. Good luck, Kristen!

 

Peg Wherry

Director of Online and Distance Learning

Extended University Montana State University

128 EPS Building, P. O. Box 173860

Bozeman, MT 59717-3860

Tel (406) 994-6685

Fax (406) 994-7856

margaret.wherry@montana.edu

http://eu.montana.edu

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of G Everett
Sent: Monday, January 09, 2012 1:43 PM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] tracking online students in PeopleSoft

 

Your questions raise issues which stretch from the administrative to the pedagogical.

Although I well understand the interest in classifying courses, and the students taking them, into f2f, blended, hybrid, online w/ synchronous elements, completely asynchronous, (and etc?), I can also understand the resistance to being typecast ahead of time.
As a faculty member, why would I want to be restricted to one and only one pedagogical mode?
As a student, I might *greatly prefer* one mode (don't the annual surveys show Blended as the perennial winner?), and I might find one mode (Online-Asynchronous) the only one practical for me, but apart from cost, why choose to be restricted to one and only one mode of instruction?

Now we're down to the nitty gritty.  Many institutions do in fact have different registration tracks, waiving certain (on-campus) fees for online or distant students.  But the distinction here to be accurate, should be whether or not the students are in residence, or close enough to participate in campus activities, not which mode they choose for their courses.

Still, there are a couple of compelling arguments for unique course codes.  Surely the registrar already insists on knowing whether or not a classroom must be scheduled? So some sort of coding must exist.
Then, how do students choose courses?  Unique coding communicates to students before registration which delivery mode will be used.  And although faculty might want all delivery options at the planning stage, most would recognize that they should not change the mode once course registration starts.

And given the increased use of both business and academic analytics, I would suspect that more sophisticated course coding is becoming a necessity.

Can any readers at those institutions well advanced in using analytics tell us if they have any way of classifying courses AFTER registration--that is, using something other than course codes?

Glenn Everett, PhD
Pembroke, MA
gseverett1@gmail.com
781-293-5857
617-688-2102
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/geverett
Blog:  http://gseverett1.wordpress.com/