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Colleagues:

Welcome!

This as an open forum and please feel free to invite others as you see fit.  The conversation will benefit from the addition of faculty, librarians, administrators, and others as we all collectively shape the shift to digital.

I propose that we jump right into the conversation by focusing on one of the most recent developments seeking to shape the textbook industry at the moment: Apple's foray into the textbook industry and its value moving forward.

If there are other points of conversation that would be beneficial, feel free to suggest.

Thanks

Nik, Marty, and Michael

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Nik-  

Thanks for getting the ball rolling.  My first question about Apple's entry into this market niche is how faculty are reacting to iAuthor.  The product has clearly met with some opposition in the media ( http://www.extremetech.com/computing/114853-apple-unmasks-the-death-star-ibooks-iauthor ) but the real test is faculty reaction.  What are people seeing on their campuses?  Any interest so far?  What kinds of questions are faculty asking?

Marty

=================================
Martin Ringle, Chief Technology Officer   
Reed College, Portland, OR 97202          
503-777-7254   email:   ringle@reed.edu                             
=================================

Marty,

I think you are right about faculty reception/adoption being the key.  However, at this point we are seeing very little reaction on our campus.  This is the second week of our spring semester so our faculty and naturally focused on other issues.  I think once the dust settles on our spring semester and some of our technology advisory committees kick into gear, this will be an exciting topic.

If I were to speculate about the reaction of our faculty (and perhaps faculty in general), I think they would have strong objections to being restricted to selling an etext online through Apple.

Joe
______________________________________
Joseph Moreau
Chief Technology Officer
State University of New York at Oswego
509 Culkin Hall
7060 State Route 104
Oswego, NY  13126
joseph.moreau@oswego.edu
315-312-5500 office
315-806-2166 mobile
315-312-5799 fax
______________________________________


How about…

Obama wants schools to speed digital transition


Obama's goal: an e-textbook in every student's hand by 2017.


Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski and Education Secretary Arne Duncan will recommend today at a summit of industry and education officials that states modify the textbook adoption process, allowing K-12 schools to use taxpayer funding once reserved for printed books on iPads, Kindles and the like — as well as software.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/story/2012-01-31/schools-e-textbooks/52907492/1

 

Sorry for the change in directions but, I read this and wondered if others think this is a real possibility? I am hoping the answer is yes.

 

Richard J. Bazile

Dean, Learning Resources-College of Central Florida

3001 SW College Road

Ocala, FL 34474-4415

Phone: 352-873-5805 x1347

baziler@cf.edu

www.educause.edu/cg/itdiversity
http://about.me/richardbazile

 

From: The EDUCAUSE eTexts Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Marty Ringle
Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] CSG eTexts - Welcome

 

Nik-  

 

Thanks for getting the ball rolling.  My first question about Apple's entry into this market niche is how faculty are reacting to iAuthor.  The product has clearly met with some opposition in the media ( http://www.extremetech.com/computing/114853-apple-unmasks-the-death-star-ibooks-iauthor ) but the real test is faculty reaction.  What are people seeing on their campuses?  Any interest so far?  What kinds of questions are faculty asking?

 

Marty

=================================

Martin Ringle, Chief Technology Officer   

Reed College, Portland, OR 97202          

503-777-7254   email:   ringle@reed.edu                             

=================================

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

I agree completely with you Joseph.  The only thing that might impact this is the lack of alternative "killer app" tools for faculty authoring.  Although we're also in the second week of the semester we've had about half a dozen faculty indicate that they'd like to try out iAuthor.

Anyone have any thoughts about how the revised iBooks stacks up as a higher ed eReader platform against Courseload, Kno, OpenClass, Inkling, or any others?

Marty 

I believe the appropriate term here is [crickets chirping]. I've heard nothing at all from my colleagues, not even either questions or rants.

Geoff

Geoffrey S. Nathan
Faculty Liaison, C&IT
and Professor, Linguistics Program
http://blogs.wayne.edu/proftech/
+1 (313) 577-1259 (C&IT)
+1 (313) 577-8621 (English/Linguistics)

From: "Marty Ringle" <ringle@REED.EDU>
To: ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent: Wednesday, February 1, 2012 11:49:46 AM
Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] CSG eTexts - Welcome

Nik-  

Thanks for getting the ball rolling.  My first question about Apple's entry into this market niche is how faculty are reacting to iAuthor.  The product has clearly met with some opposition in the media ( http://www.extremetech.com/computing/114853-apple-unmasks-the-death-star-ibooks-iauthor ) but the real test is faculty reaction.  What are people seeing on their campuses?  Any interest so far?  What kinds of questions are faculty asking?

Marty

=================================
Martin Ringle, Chief Technology Officer   
Reed College, Portland, OR 97202          
503-777-7254   email:   ringle@reed.edu                             
=================================

Marty:

Being a fairly Apple centric campus I have gotten feedback from some faculty who have already experimented with iAuthor and do believe that it will be a valuable tool. However, when I mention some of the restriction/rules that will be applied to items published with iAuthor they recoil with that typical frustration with Apple Control. I still sense that they are open to exploring this further.

Greg Smith
Chief Information Officer
George Fox University
------------------------------
Be Known at Oregon's Nationally Recognized Christian University


Hi Everyone.  Last week I was at a gathering of 120 people who have worked on the NMC Horizon Report for the past 10 years.  We identified the shift to eTextbook as a major issue that intersects with several mega-trends: increased demand for portability, shifts in the business models for publishers, the changing nature of libraries, the creation and publication of open content, the increasing dependence on cloud-based services, etc...

On a more local level, we have a textbook on civil liberties litigation that was written by one of our law professors: open content with video elements.  We've moved it into a variety of formats over the past year (HTML 5, ePub, PDF).  We'll be moving it into the format being used by iBooks so we can get a sense of what that means and how it works.  We're looking at some pedagogical issues such as how sections of a text can be referenced, how portable the content is, note taking, and shared annotation.

In any case, several of us are curious.  Early investigations into iAuthor look promising.  However, there is significant concern about the business implications of buying into a single-vendor solution.  On the other hand, if we're willing to put content into multiple formats and release it for the good of others, I don't see an issue.

     -Allan-

ETEXTS Digest - 1 Feb 2012 (#2012-2)

What comes to mind for me when I read Marty’s excellent question about eReader platforms is “What about the content?”  As with many other technologies, the hardware, software, and network options are only as good as the content that will be utilized.

 

There are many reasons e-textbooks (or more appropriately “digital content”) have not taken off as quickly as general reading books:

 

1.       Hardware – not everyone wants to read a book on a computer and not all students (in the past) had easy or convenient access to the hardware, despite the prevalence of 24/7 computer labs on campus.  The original introduction of the iPad and growth of other tablets combined with an increasing number of students who own a laptop or netbook and the convergence of eReader hardware such as the Kindle Fire, this barrier is rapidly disappearing.

 

2.       Software – I would not characterize the availability of eReader software as a barrier, but this brings up Marty’s point.  All readers are not created equal.  While I prefer the look and feel of the iBooks reader on an iPad, I know others who prefer the Kindle eReader.  The one distinction with textbooks is that it must be able to handle the more robust illustrations, charts, images, etc. found in a traditional textbook.

 

3.       Content & Copyright – the availability of content has been another huge limitation for many reasons, principally the challenge in converting multiple copyrights in a textbook from the printed rights to digital permissions which are different.  This is one reason why so many general interest or fiction books are available for the Kindle or Nook – those works have very few copyrights involved, while textbooks can have a significant number of copyright holders for each chart, image, etc.  Conversely, content produced by Inkling is high quality, similar to Apple.

 

The copyright limitations cause some e-Textbooks may have a placeholder where copyrighted material was located in the printed text with a message such as “copyright permission not granted for this image (chart, diagram, etc.)”  If I was a student relying solely on the digital version I would not be happy to be forced to go look for that content in a printed version of the book to see what I am missing and if it is of any value.

 

4.       Value Pricing – although this is also changing, the value proposition for students has not been there sufficient to encourage widespread adoption.  The types of digital content vary wildly from a PDF version of the printed text to content on web sites requiring access codes to robust digital native textbooks.  The pricing also varies significantly when compared to the printed next textbook price.

 

Unfortunately, the PDF version is the most prevalent form today and even then, only available for a small percentage (10-20%) of the print titles available.  As you can imagine, this content form isn’t very appealing to students, but the pricing on these is approximately 50% of the new text printed price and has a typically has limited license of about one semester and can’t be resold when the student is finished.

 

The Apple foray into the e-Textbook realm is an interesting development, but won’t take over the textbook world as some enthusiasts may predict.  Apple iBooks is a good eReader and the pricing on the ten K-12 textbook titles currently offered is amazing.  One criticism will be that anything Apple will always be proprietary, including iAuthor and the rights for content faculty create, but that hasn’t limited their success with music.

 

It is highly unlikely that the traditional textbook publishers will grant across-the-board exclusivity to most textbook content as it relates to a single distribution model, including CourseSmart which is their own collaborative partnership.  They want to offer their content in many ways and forms and via multiple distribution channels including college bookstores, LMS plug-ins, Amazon, consumer-to-publisher direct, CourseLoad, and now Apple.

 

Jeff Nelson

BGSU

 

 

 

 

From: Marty Ringle [mailto:ringle@REED.EDU]
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2012 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: CSG eTexts - Welcome

 

I agree completely with you Joseph.  The only thing that might impact this is the lack of alternative "killer app" tools for faculty authoring.  Although we're also in the second week of the semester we've had about half a dozen faculty indicate that they'd like to try out iAuthor.

 

Anyone have any thoughts about how the revised iBooks stacks up as a higher ed eReader platform against Courseload, Kno, OpenClass, Inkling, or any others?

 

Marty 

 


Students have not embraced eTexts.   According to Student Monitor's fall 2011 survey of undergraduates:

•   Less than a fifth (17 pct.) of full-time undergraduates have purchased an eText.

•   Less than a third (27 pct.) of full-time undergraduates report being “very interested” in buying digital books for personal reading (as opposed to required reading for their college courses).

•   Just one percent (1 pct.) of the textbooks used by undergraduates in fall 2011 were in digital format (eTexts).

•   Among students who had experience with eTexts, the major drivers for eText use was that “my professor required me” to do so (35 pct.), followed by “less expensive than a traditional textbook” (30 pct.).

•   Among students who had no direct experience with eTexts, two-fifths (40 pct.) stated that they “don’t like reading on a screen for a long period of time” while a third (34 pct.) reported that they “prefer traditional printed textbooks” to eTexts.

 

Also significant are data from Student Monitor’s spring 2011 national survey of undergrads: asked about their preferred format for textbooks if price were not an issue (i.e., if all formats such as new, used, rental, and digital were the same price), three-fifths (60 percent) of the survey participants said they would buy a new book, only 4 percent wanted to download an eText, and fully a sixth (17 percent) expressed a preference for a used textbook.  The used book number (17 percent) suggests that many undergraduates see real value in the marginal notes and highlighting provided by other students.  In sum, these data confirm that despite status their status as digital natives, undergraduates have not (yet) embraced digital texts.

eTexts have also not (yet) delivered on the great expectations for reduced costs.  As noted in my January 10th Digital Tweed blog, Recalibrating Expectations for eTexts, digital editions are actually among the more expensive textbook options forstudents.  The Digital Tweed post presents price point data for new, used, rental, international, and digital editions of a widely used economics textbook.  Students who buy and return (some) used books to Amazon can even bring the "net use" cost down to almost $0.00.

While content may be king, platforms, added-value, and pricing will ultimately affect the eventual student acceptance of eTexts.  Platforms, added-value, and pricing will also play a big role in the futures and fortunes of firms, both traditional educational publishers and the new educational textbook app providers, eager to digitize and transform the textbook market in higher education.  We are in the very early stages of this transition from print to digital. Like so much of the technology experience in higher ed over the past three decades, it will take time, and it will very be interesting to watch.

Casey Green
Campus Computing

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
 Kenneth C. Green   818.990.2212
 The Campus Computing Project®
 www.campuscomputing.net
 cgreen@campuscomputing.net
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


From: Jeff Nelson <nelsonj@BGSU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE eTexts Constituent Group Listserv <ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 2 Feb 2012 10:42:39 -0500
To: <ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] CSG eTexts - Welcome

ETEXTS Digest - 1 Feb 2012 (#2012-2)

What comes to mind for me when I read Marty’s excellent question about eReader platforms is “What about the content?”  As with many other technologies, the hardware, software, and network options are only as good as the content that will be utilized.

 

There are many reasons e-textbooks (or more appropriately “digital content”) have not taken off as quickly as general reading books:

 

1.       Hardware – not everyone wants to read a book on a computer and not all students (in the past) had easy or convenient access to the hardware, despite the prevalence of 24/7 computer labs on campus.  The original introduction of the iPad and growth of other tablets combined with an increasing number of students who own a laptop or netbook and the convergence of eReader hardware such as the Kindle Fire, this barrier is rapidly disappearing.

 

2.       Software – I would not characterize the availability of eReader software as a barrier, but this brings up Marty’s point.  All readers are not created equal.  While I prefer the look and feel of the iBooks reader on an iPad, I know others who prefer the Kindle eReader.  The one distinction with textbooks is that it must be able to handle the more robust illustrations, charts, images, etc. found in a traditional textbook.

 

3.       Content & Copyright – the availability of content has been another huge limitation for many reasons, principally the challenge in converting multiple copyrights in a textbook from the printed rights to digital permissions which are different.  This is one reason why so many general interest or fiction books are available for the Kindle or Nook – those works have very few copyrights involved, while textbooks can have a significant number of copyright holders for each chart, image, etc.  Conversely, content produced by Inkling is high quality, similar to Apple.

 

The copyright limitations cause some e-Textbooks may have a placeholder where copyrighted material was located in the printed text with a message such as “copyright permission not granted for this image (chart, diagram, etc.)”  If I was a student relying solely on the digital version I would not be happy to be forced to go look for that content in a printed version of the book to see what I am missing and if it is of any value.

 

4.       Value Pricing – although this is also changing, the value proposition for students has not been there sufficient to encourage widespread adoption.  The types of digital content vary wildly from a PDF version of the printed text to content on web sites requiring access codes to robust digital native textbooks.  The pricing also varies significantly when compared to the printed next textbook price.

 

Unfortunately, the PDF version is the most prevalent form today and even then, only available for a small percentage (10-20%) of the print titles available.  As you can imagine, this content form isn’t very appealing to students, but the pricing on these is approximately 50% of the new text printed price and has a typically has limited license of about one semester and can’t be resold when the student is finished.

 

The Apple foray into the e-Textbook realm is an interesting development, but won’t take over the textbook world as some enthusiasts may predict.  Apple iBooks is a good eReader and the pricing on the ten K-12 textbook titles currently offered is amazing.  One criticism will be that anything Apple will always be proprietary, including iAuthor and the rights for content faculty create, but that hasn’t limited their success with music.

 

It is highly unlikely that the traditional textbook publishers will grant across-the-board exclusivity to most textbook content as it relates to a single distribution model, including CourseSmart which is their own collaborative partnership.  They want to offer their content in many ways and forms and via multiple distribution channels including college bookstores, LMS plug-ins, Amazon, consumer-to-publisher direct, CourseLoad, and now Apple.

 

Jeff Nelson

BGSU

 

 

 

 

From: Marty Ringle [mailto:ringle@REED.EDU]
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2012 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: CSG eTexts - Welcome

 

I agree completely with you Joseph.  The only thing that might impact this is the lack of alternative "killer app" tools for faculty authoring.  Although we're also in the second week of the semester we've had about half a dozen faculty indicate that they'd like to try out iAuthor.

 

Anyone have any thoughts about how the revised iBooks stacks up as a higher ed eReader platform against Courseload, Kno, OpenClass, Inkling, or any others?

 

Marty 

 

Great comments Jeff.  Regarding eReader platforms (as you mention below), I'm especially interested in what other schools are looking at most seriously.  For example, we were looking closely at Kno as a potential eReader platform but were brought up short when we learned that it's not currently ADA compliant.   We're now considering both OpenClass and iBooks in some detail to see how well the feature sets (and materials costs) align with student needs.

Marty

=================================
Martin Ringle, Chief Technology Officer   
Reed College, Portland, OR 97202          
503-777-7254   email:   ringle@reed.edu                             
=================================

Casey touches on a number of key points that helpfully expand the dialogue of this list.

 

First...why just watch?

 

I agree that the path from print only to digital (with print options) will evolve over some span of time and unevenly among academic disciplines.  The terms under which our students buy eTexts, however, are shifting and solidifying NOW before our eyes.  Do we just say, darn, I wish our students could print?  Wish the content didn't go poof in a few months?  Grouse that many current eText prices are roughly double the net price of a shrewd buy and sell back?  Wait for RIAA/MPAA Redux in Congress for this category of content? 

 

I hope not.  Content creators are rightly making offers and asserting how they would like to sell as their world goes increasingly digital.  Now is a great time for institutions and students to join that market conversation and make known how we wish to buy.  Our models, data, and conversations with publishers show there is a clear path forward that reduces costs to students, pays content producers better and more reliable than the status quo, and heads off a bunch of unpleasant things for students and institutions.  This is fundamentally a supply chain/distribution channel design problem in terms of the economics for buyers, sellers, and intermediaries.  Casey’s posts highlight a number of the flaws in what we’ve seen thus far with initial approaches to eTexts.

 

Second…Walkmans or Palm Pilots?

 

If I properly recall my mid-1990s history, there were no long queues outside of Radio Shack demanding a personal digital assistant.  Apple’s Newton had over-reached and flopped in the market and various gadgets had tried this or that for quite some time.  Then Palm came forward with its bundle of software and a device and it set a consumer sales record of selling 1M units faster than Sony hit 1M sales of Walkmans. 

 

Surveys are very useful for snapshots of the past, but they necessitate caution at predicting shifting curves.  We are (finally) on a fairly steep slope of improving consumer devices, improving reading/annotation software for PCs/Tablets/Mobility, and improving economic terms that give both print/digital and access on most any device.  Our opportunity is to help figure out the content models that will best work as these curves converge.

 

Great conversation -- Brad

----------------------------------------------------------------------

IU Vice President for IT & CIO, Dean, and Professor

Indiana University, http://ovpit.iu.edu 

 

 

 

 

 

------Original Message------

From: Casey Green

To: ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU

ReplyTo: The EDUCAUSE eTexts Constituent Group Listserv

Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] CSG eTexts - Welcome

Sent: Feb 2, 2012 11:28 AM

 

 

Students have not embraced eTexts.   According to Student Monitor's fall 2011 survey of undergraduates:

•   Less than a fifth (17 pct.) of full-time undergraduates have purchased an eText.

•   Less than a third (27 pct.) of full-time undergraduates report being “very interested” in buying digital books for personal reading (as opposed to required reading for their college courses).

•   Just one percent (1 pct.) of the textbooks used by undergraduates in fall 2011 were in digital format (eTexts).

•   Among students who had experience with eTexts, the major drivers for eText use was that “my professor required me” to do so (35 pct.), followed by “less expensive than a traditional textbook” (30 pct.).

•   Among students who had no direct experience with eTexts, two-fifths (40 pct.) stated that they “don’t like reading on a screen for a long period of time” while a third (34 pct.) reported that they “prefer traditional printed textbooks” to eTexts.

 

Also significant are data from Student Monitor’s spring 2011 national survey of undergrads: asked about their preferred format for textbooks if price were not an issue (i.e., if all formats such as new, used, rental, and digital were the same price), three-fifths (60 percent) of the survey participants said they would buy a new book, only 4 percent wanted to download an eText, and fully a sixth (17 percent) expressed a preference for a used textbook.  The used book number (17 percent) suggests that many undergraduates see real value in the marginal notes and highlighting provided by other students.  In sum, these data confirm that despite status their status as digital natives, undergraduates have not (yet) embraced digital texts.

eTexts have also not (yet) delivered on the great expectations for reduced costs.  As noted in my January 10th Digital Tweed blog, Recalibrating Expectations for eTexts, digital editions are actually among the more expensive textbook options forstudents.  The Digital Tweed post presents price point data for new, used, rental, international, and digital editions of a widely used economics textbook.  Students who buy and return (some) used books to Amazon can even bring the "net use" cost down to almost $0.00.

 

While content may be king, platforms, added-value, and pricing will ultimately affect the eventual student acceptance of eTexts.  Platforms, added-value, and pricing will also play a big role in the futures and fortunes of firms, both traditional educational publishers and the new educational textbook app providers, eager to digitize and transform the textbook market in higher education.  We are in the very early stages of this transition from print to digital. Like so much of the technology experience in higher ed over the past three decades, it will take time, and it will very be interesting to watch.

 

Casey Green Campus Computing

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

 Kenneth C. Green   818.990.2212

 The Campus Computing Project®

 www.campuscomputing.net

 cgreen@campuscomputing.net

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

 

From: Jeff Nelson <nelsonj@BGSU.EDU>

Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE eTexts Constituent Group Listserv <ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>

Date: Thu, 2 Feb 2012 10:42:39 -0500

To: <ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>

Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] CSG eTexts - Welcome

 

What comes to mind for me when I read Marty’s excellent question about eReader platforms is “What about the content?”  As with many other technologies, the hardware, software, and network options are only as good as the content that will be utilized.

 

There are many reasons e-textbooks (or more appropriately “digital content”) have not taken off as quickly as general reading books:

 

1.       Hardware – not everyone wants to read a book on a computer and not all students (in the past) had easy or convenient access to the hardware, despite the prevalence of 24/7 computer labs on campus.  The original introduction of the iPad and growth of other tablets combined with an increasing number of students who own a laptop or netbook and the convergence of eReader hardware such as the Kindle Fire, this barrier is rapidly disappearing.

 

2.       Software – I would not characterize the availability of eReader software as a barrier, but this brings up Marty’s point.  All readers are not created equal.  While I prefer the look and feel of the iBooks reader on an iPad, I know others who prefer the Kindle eReader.  The one distinction with textbooks is that it must be able to handle the more robust illustrations, charts, images, etc. found in a traditional textbook.

 

3.       Content & Copyright – the availability of content has been another huge limitation for many reasons, principally the challenge in converting multiple copyrights in a textbook from the printed rights to digital permissions which are different.  This is one reason why so many general interest or fiction books are available for the Kindle or Nook – those works have very few copyrights involved, while textbooks can have a significant number of copyright holders for each chart, image, etc.  Conversely, content produced by Inkling is high quality, similar to Apple.

 

The copyright limitations cause some e-Textbooks may have a placeholder where copyrighted material was located in the printed text with a message such as “copyright permission not granted for this image (chart, diagram, etc.)”  If I was a student relying solely on the digital version I would not be happy to be forced to go look for that content in a printed version of the book to see what I am missing and if it is of any value.

 

4.       Value Pricing – although this is also changing, the value proposition for students has not been there sufficient to encourage widespread adoption.  The types of digital content vary wildly from a PDF version of the printed text to content on web sites requiring access codes to robust digital native textbooks.  The pricing also varies significantly when compared to the printed next textbook price.

 

Unfortunately, the PDF version is the most prevalent form today and even then, only available for a small percentage (10-20%) of the print titles available.  As you can imagine, this content form isn’t very appealing to students, but the pricing on these is approximately 50% of the new text printed price and has a typically has limited license of about one semester and can’t be resold when the student is finished.

 

The Apple foray into the e-Textbook realm is an interesting development, but won’t take over the textbook world as some enthusiasts may predict.  Apple iBooks is a good eReader and the pricing on the ten K-12 textbook titles currently offered is amazing.  One criticism will be that anything Apple will always be proprietary, including iAuthor and the rights for content faculty create, but that hasn’t limited their success with music.

 

It is highly unlikely that the traditional textbook publishers will grant across-the-board exclusivity to most textbook content as it relates to a single distribution model, including CourseSmart which is their own collaborative partnership.  They want to offer their content in many ways and forms and via multiple distribution channels including college bookstores, LMS plug-ins, Amazon, consumer-to-publisher direct, CourseLoad, and now Apple.

 

Jeff Nelson

BGSU

 

 

 

 

From: Marty Ringle [mailto:ringle@REED.EDU]

Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2012 12:28 PM

Subject: Re: CSG eTexts - Welcome

 

I agree completely with you Joseph.  The only thing that might impact this is the lack of alternative "killer app" tools for faculty authoring.  Although we're also in the second week of the semester we've had about half a dozen faculty indicate that they'd like to try out iAuthor.

 

Anyone have any thoughts about how the revised iBooks stacks up as a higher ed eReader platform against Courseload, Kno, OpenClass, Inkling, or any others?

 

Marty 

 

Couple of comments:

Hardware – not everyone wants to read a book on a computer and not all students (in the past) had easy or convenient access to the hardware, despite the prevalence of 24/7 computer labs on campus.  The original introduction of the iPad and growth of other tablets combined with an increasing number of students who own a laptop or netbook and the convergence of eReader hardware such as the Kindle Fire, this barrier is rapidly disappearing.

This is a key reason why the focus needs to be on "digital and print" not "digital or print".  Our students/faculty need to choose how they consume the content rather than being forced down one path or another, whether that be a decision regarding digital or hard copy, or what device they can use to access their content.  Providing print and digital options and being device agnostic will go a long way towards accelerating the shift.


Value Pricing – although this is also changing, the value proposition for students has not been there sufficient to encourage widespread adoption.  The types of digital content vary wildly from a PDF version of the printed text to content on web sites requiring access codes to robust digital native textbooks.  The pricing also varies significantly when compared to the printed next textbook price.

Unfortunately, the PDF version is the most prevalent form today and even then, only available for a small percentage (10-20%) of the print titles available.  As you can imagine, this content form isn’t very appealing to students, but the pricing on these is approximately 50% of the new text printed price and has a typically has limited license of about one semester and can’t be resold when the student is finished.

 

The Apple foray into the e-Textbook realm is an interesting development, but won’t take over the textbook world as some enthusiasts may predict.  Apple iBooks is a good eReader and the pricing on the ten K-12 textbook titles currently offered is amazing.  One criticism will be that anything Apple will always be proprietary, including iAuthor and the rights for content faculty create, but that hasn’t limited their success with music.

 

It is highly unlikely that the traditional textbook publishers will grant across-the-board exclusivity to most textbook content as it relates to a single distribution model, including CourseSmart which is their own collaborative partnership.  They want to offer their content in many ways and forms and via multiple distribution channels including college bookstores, LMS plug-ins, Amazon, consumer-to-publisher direct, CourseLoad, and now Apple.


This is exactly the reason why institutions of higher education need to get involved.  We can clearly see that publishers are trying to sell etexts with these unnecessary restrictions (length of access, limited printing, etc) and pricing models that do not represent a viable path forward.  As an esteemed colleague of mine often says "Publishers have asserted how they wish to sell, we must now begin to assert how we wish to buy" 


On Apple's foray into the K-12 market.  Much is being said about this $14.99 pricing, however one must take into consideration the differences in the K-12 market and the higher education market.  In the K-12 market, books are often purchased by a school district for $75 - $125 and are used for 3-5 years at a time.  Considering that each student will be charged $14.99 per book, per semester, the savings do not seem so significant.  Couple that with the fact that you will need an Apple product to view the content, and the price just got higher.  


Though its true that publishers want to offer their content through numerous channels, selling directly to universities is their best path forward.  Under a business to business relationship, publishers can eliminate the middleman, achieve 100% sell-through, and have a direct vehicle to sell their high margin digital supplements.  No other arrangement achieves all of those objectives for the publishers.


Nik




From: Jeff Nelson <nelsonj@BGSU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE eTexts Constituent Group Listserv <ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 2 Feb 2012 10:42:39 -0500
To: <ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] CSG eTexts - Welcome

ETEXTS Digest - 1 Feb 2012 (#2012-2)

What comes to mind for me when I read Marty’s excellent question about eReader platforms is “What about the content?”  As with many other technologies, the hardware, software, and network options are only as good as the content that will be utilized.

 

There are many reasons e-textbooks (or more appropriately “digital content”) have not taken off as quickly as general reading books:

 

1.       Hardware – not everyone wants to read a book on a computer and not all students (in the past) had easy or convenient access to the hardware, despite the prevalence of 24/7 computer labs on campus.  The original introduction of the iPad and growth of other tablets combined with an increasing number of students who own a laptop or netbook and the convergence of eReader hardware such as the Kindle Fire, this barrier is rapidly disappearing.

 

2.       Software – I would not characterize the availability of eReader software as a barrier, but this brings up Marty’s point.  All readers are not created equal.  While I prefer the look and feel of the iBooks reader on an iPad, I know others who prefer the Kindle eReader.  The one distinction with textbooks is that it must be able to handle the more robust illustrations, charts, images, etc. found in a traditional textbook.

 

3.       Content & Copyright – the availability of content has been another huge limitation for many reasons, principally the challenge in converting multiple copyrights in a textbook from the printed rights to digital permissions which are different.  This is one reason why so many general interest or fiction books are available for the Kindle or Nook – those works have very few copyrights involved, while textbooks can have a significant number of copyright holders for each chart, image, etc.  Conversely, content produced by Inkling is high quality, similar to Apple.

 

The copyright limitations cause some e-Textbooks may have a placeholder where copyrighted material was located in the printed text with a message such as “copyright permission not granted for this image (chart, diagram, etc.)”  If I was a student relying solely on the digital version I would not be happy to be forced to go look for that content in a printed version of the book to see what I am missing and if it is of any value.

 

4.       Value Pricing – although this is also changing, the value proposition for students has not been there sufficient to encourage widespread adoption.  The types of digital content vary wildly from a PDF version of the printed text to content on web sites requiring access codes to robust digital native textbooks.  The pricing also varies significantly when compared to the printed next textbook price.

 

Unfortunately, the PDF version is the most prevalent form today and even then, only available for a small percentage (10-20%) of the print titles available.  As you can imagine, this content form isn’t very appealing to students, but the pricing on these is approximately 50% of the new text printed price and has a typically has limited license of about one semester and can’t be resold when the student is finished.

 

The Apple foray into the e-Textbook realm is an interesting development, but won’t take over the textbook world as some enthusiasts may predict.  Apple iBooks is a good eReader and the pricing on the ten K-12 textbook titles currently offered is amazing.  One criticism will be that anything Apple will always be proprietary, including iAuthor and the rights for content faculty create, but that hasn’t limited their success with music.

 

It is highly unlikely that the traditional textbook publishers will grant across-the-board exclusivity to most textbook content as it relates to a single distribution model, including CourseSmart which is their own collaborative partnership.  They want to offer their content in many ways and forms and via multiple distribution channels including college bookstores, LMS plug-ins, Amazon, consumer-to-publisher direct, CourseLoad, and now Apple.

 

Jeff Nelson

BGSU

 

 

 

 

From: Marty Ringle [mailto:ringle@REED.EDU]
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2012 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: CSG eTexts - Welcome

 

I agree completely with you Joseph.  The only thing that might impact this is the lack of alternative "killer app" tools for faculty authoring.  Although we're also in the second week of the semester we've had about half a dozen faculty indicate that they'd like to try out iAuthor.

 

Anyone have any thoughts about how the revised iBooks stacks up as a higher ed eReader platform against Courseload, Kno, OpenClass, Inkling, or any others?

 

Marty 

 

We are a significant user of e-texts for online courses.  And our e-texts do go beyond the PDF to digital content.   However, as noted, some students do not want digital content, so we make a black and white loose leaf version available at a nominal cost.   Some publishers are better than others (by a wide margin) at dealing with ADA needs such as transcripted and narrated  videos, alt tags and other accommodations.  These can be extremely important and very expensive and time-consuming to do in house.  So be wary.  We do have contracts with our publishers so all our e-texts are charged to students via course fees which are about $52/course.  

Julie

Julie Ouska
CIO/VP, Information Technology
Interim Executive Director, CCCOnline
Colorado Community College System
julie.ouska@cccs.edu
(720) 858-2781


From: "Osborne, Nik" <nosborne@IU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE eTexts Constituent Group Listserv <ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 2 Feb 2012 20:07:31 -0700
To: "ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] CSG eTexts - Welcome

Couple of comments:

Hardware – not everyone wants to read a book on a computer and not all students (in the past) had easy or convenient access to the hardware, despite the prevalence of 24/7 computer labs on campus.  The original introduction of the iPad and growth of other tablets combined with an increasing number of students who own a laptop or netbook and the convergence of eReader hardware such as the Kindle Fire, this barrier is rapidly disappearing.

This is a key reason why the focus needs to be on "digital and print" not "digital or print".  Our students/faculty need to choose how they consume the content rather than being forced down one path or another, whether that be a decision regarding digital or hard copy, or what device they can use to access their content.  Providing print and digital options and being device agnostic will go a long way towards accelerating the shift.


Value Pricing – although this is also changing, the value proposition for students has not been there sufficient to encourage widespread adoption.  The types of digital content vary wildly from a PDF version of the printed text to content on web sites requiring access codes to robust digital native textbooks.  The pricing also varies significantly when compared to the printed next textbook price.

Unfortunately, the PDF version is the most prevalent form today and even then, only available for a small percentage (10-20%) of the print titles available.  As you can imagine, this content form isn’t very appealing to students, but the pricing on these is approximately 50% of the new text printed price and has a typically has limited license of about one semester and can’t be resold when the student is finished.

 

The Apple foray into the e-Textbook realm is an interesting development, but won’t take over the textbook world as some enthusiasts may predict.  Apple iBooks is a good eReader and the pricing on the ten K-12 textbook titles currently offered is amazing.  One criticism will be that anything Apple will always be proprietary, including iAuthor and the rights for content faculty create, but that hasn’t limited their success with music.

 

It is highly unlikely that the traditional textbook publishers will grant across-the-board exclusivity to most textbook content as it relates to a single distribution model, including CourseSmart which is their own collaborative partnership.  They want to offer their content in many ways and forms and via multiple distribution channels including college bookstores, LMS plug-ins, Amazon, consumer-to-publisher direct, CourseLoad, and now Apple.


This is exactly the reason why institutions of higher education need to get involved.  We can clearly see that publishers are trying to sell etexts with these unnecessary restrictions (length of access, limited printing, etc) and pricing models that do not represent a viable path forward.  As an esteemed colleague of mine often says "Publishers have asserted how they wish to sell, we must now begin to assert how we wish to buy" 


On Apple's foray into the K-12 market.  Much is being said about this $14.99 pricing, however one must take into consideration the differences in the K-12 market and the higher education market.  In the K-12 market, books are often purchased by a school district for $75 - $125 and are used for 3-5 years at a time.  Considering that each student will be charged $14.99 per book, per semester, the savings do not seem so significant.  Couple that with the fact that you will need an Apple product to view the content, and the price just got higher.  


Though its true that publishers want to offer their content through numerous channels, selling directly to universities is their best path forward.  Under a business to business relationship, publishers can eliminate the middleman, achieve 100% sell-through, and have a direct vehicle to sell their high margin digital supplements.  No other arrangement achieves all of those objectives for the publishers.


Nik




From: Jeff Nelson <nelsonj@BGSU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE eTexts Constituent Group Listserv <ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 2 Feb 2012 10:42:39 -0500
To: <ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] CSG eTexts - Welcome

ETEXTS Digest - 1 Feb 2012 (#2012-2)

What comes to mind for me when I read Marty’s excellent question about eReader platforms is “What about the content?”  As with many other technologies, the hardware, software, and network options are only as good as the content that will be utilized.

 

There are many reasons e-textbooks (or more appropriately “digital content”) have not taken off as quickly as general reading books:

 

1.       Hardware – not everyone wants to read a book on a computer and not all students (in the past) had easy or convenient access to the hardware, despite the prevalence of 24/7 computer labs on campus.  The original introduction of the iPad and growth of other tablets combined with an increasing number of students who own a laptop or netbook and the convergence of eReader hardware such as the Kindle Fire, this barrier is rapidly disappearing.

 

2.       Software – I would not characterize the availability of eReader software as a barrier, but this brings up Marty’s point.  All readers are not created equal.  While I prefer the look and feel of the iBooks reader on an iPad, I know others who prefer the Kindle eReader.  The one distinction with textbooks is that it must be able to handle the more robust illustrations, charts, images, etc. found in a traditional textbook.

 

3.       Content & Copyright – the availability of content has been another huge limitation for many reasons, principally the challenge in converting multiple copyrights in a textbook from the printed rights to digital permissions which are different.  This is one reason why so many general interest or fiction books are available for the Kindle or Nook – those works have very few copyrights involved, while textbooks can have a significant number of copyright holders for each chart, image, etc.  Conversely, content produced by Inkling is high quality, similar to Apple.

 

The copyright limitations cause some e-Textbooks may have a placeholder where copyrighted material was located in the printed text with a message such as “copyright permission not granted for this image (chart, diagram, etc.)”  If I was a student relying solely on the digital version I would not be happy to be forced to go look for that content in a printed version of the book to see what I am missing and if it is of any value.

 

4.       Value Pricing – although this is also changing, the value proposition for students has not been there sufficient to encourage widespread adoption.  The types of digital content vary wildly from a PDF version of the printed text to content on web sites requiring access codes to robust digital native textbooks.  The pricing also varies significantly when compared to the printed next textbook price.

 

Unfortunately, the PDF version is the most prevalent form today and even then, only available for a small percentage (10-20%) of the print titles available.  As you can imagine, this content form isn’t very appealing to students, but the pricing on these is approximately 50% of the new text printed price and has a typically has limited license of about one semester and can’t be resold when the student is finished.

 

The Apple foray into the e-Textbook realm is an interesting development, but won’t take over the textbook world as some enthusiasts may predict.  Apple iBooks is a good eReader and the pricing on the ten K-12 textbook titles currently offered is amazing.  One criticism will be that anything Apple will always be proprietary, including iAuthor and the rights for content faculty create, but that hasn’t limited their success with music.

 

It is highly unlikely that the traditional textbook publishers will grant across-the-board exclusivity to most textbook content as it relates to a single distribution model, including CourseSmart which is their own collaborative partnership.  They want to offer their content in many ways and forms and via multiple distribution channels including college bookstores, LMS plug-ins, Amazon, consumer-to-publisher direct, CourseLoad, and now Apple.

 

Jeff Nelson

BGSU

 

 

 

 

From: Marty Ringle [mailto:ringle@REED.EDU]
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2012 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: CSG eTexts - Welcome

 

I agree completely with you Joseph.  The only thing that might impact this is the lack of alternative "killer app" tools for faculty authoring.  Although we're also in the second week of the semester we've had about half a dozen faculty indicate that they'd like to try out iAuthor.

 

Anyone have any thoughts about how the revised iBooks stacks up as a higher ed eReader platform against Courseload, Kno, OpenClass, Inkling, or any others?

 

Marty 

 

As an advocate for e-textbooks and open textbooks on my campus, and also a doctoral student, I think two aspects stand out as blockers to adoption of e-textbooks as of today.

1) E-textbook formats do not support academic reading consistently. Highlighting and annotating are the main activities related to academic reading, and some platforms support it better than others. I predict that tagging, copying/pasting with citation, and social reading will become more important in the near future.

2) Not all titles are available on all platforms. I mostly built my book collection in a Kindle format, but sometimes the only e-textbooks I have available are on Kno or iBooks, and they are not portable. Having to switch environment to read textbooks is inefficient and frustrating, especially as I build proficiency in a particular one.

==================================
Mathieu Plourde, MBA
Project Leader, LMS/Educational Technologist
IT Client Support & Services
mathieu@udel.edu
Office: 302-831-4060
==================================
IT Support Center: http://www.udel.edu/help
Sakai@UD Support and Training: http://www.udel.edu/sakai/training
Open Education at UD Blog: http://sites.udel.edu/open/



Mathieu-

You've hit the nail on the head.  I see this as potentially the biggest challenge we face.  Unless we can collectively pressure publishers, distributors, and eReader vendors to pursue a standards-based (or at least a file format inter-operability) approach, fragmentation among eBooks and other digital materials will quickly become a nightmare for students and faculty and the potential utility of eBooks will languish indefinitely.

Marty  

=================================
Martin Ringle, Chief Technology Officer   
Reed College, Portland, OR 97202          
503-777-7254   email:   ringle@reed.edu                             
=================================

Folks,

Speaking of platform incompatibility, has anyone had any significant experience with the dandy little application linked below:


On the surface this would appear to help a user overcome some of these platform issues.  However, not having much experience with it, I'm not sure how successful it really is.

Joe
______________________________________
Joseph Moreau
Chief Technology Officer
State University of New York at Oswego
509 Culkin Hall
7060 State Route 104
Oswego, NY  13126
joseph.moreau@oswego.edu
315-312-5500 office
315-806-2166 mobile
315-312-5799 fax
______________________________________


Joe, thanks for sharing the link.  I am encouraged to learn that solutions are evolving to address the platform issue.

~Renee

 

Renee Pfeifer-Luckett
Director, Learning Technology Center
Instructional, Communication & Information Technology (iCIT)

University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
800 W. Main St., Whitewater, WI 53190
E/IM/Skype: pfeiferr@uww.edu
T: 262-472-7795 | Twitter: ReneePL | SL: Renata Sharpshire

 

From: Joseph Moreau [mailto:joseph.moreau@OSWEGO.EDU]
Sent: Monday, February 06, 2012 7:16 AM
Subject: Re: CSG eTexts - Welcome

 

Folks,

 

Speaking of platform incompatibility, has anyone had any significant experience with the dandy little application linked below:

 

 

On the surface this would appear to help a user overcome some of these platform issues.  However, not having much experience with it, I'm not sure how successful it really is.

 

Joe
______________________________________
Joseph Moreau
Chief Technology Officer
State University of New York at Oswego
509 Culkin Hall
7060 State Route 104
Oswego, NY  13126
joseph.moreau@oswego.edu
315-312-5500 office
315-806-2166 mobile
315-312-5799 fax
______________________________________

Hi Joseph,

I like the idea of Calibre. Unfortunately, too many ebook platforms still support DRM. See what happened when I tried to convert a Kindle book to epub in Calibre:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mathplourde/6835907639/

Anyone knows ebook platforms/vendors selling DRM-free books? We should start a nice/naughty list.

==================================
Mathieu Plourde, MBA
Project Leader, LMS/Educational Technologist
IT Client Support & Services
mathieu@udel.edu
Office: 302-831-4060
==================================
IT Support Center: http://www.udel.edu/help
Sakai@UD Support and Training: http://www.udel.edu/sakai/training
Open Education at UD Blog: http://sites.udel.edu/open/



Several publishers are waiving DRM, such as De Gruyter, Blackwell, S. Hirzel Verlag, and Wiley. Look into http://gluejar.com/ as well.

 

Best,

Jennifer

 

Jennifer Dekker

Librarian / Bibliothécaire

University of Ottawa / Université d'Ottawa

65 University Pr. Room / Pièce 105

Ottawa ON K1N 6N5

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE eTexts Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Mathieu Plourde
Sent: February-07-12 10:10 AM
To: ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] CSG eTexts - Welcome

 

Hi Joseph,

I like the idea of Calibre. Unfortunately, too many ebook platforms still support DRM. See what happened when I tried to convert a Kindle book to epub in Calibre:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mathplourde/6835907639/

Anyone knows ebook platforms/vendors selling DRM-free books? We should start a nice/naughty list.

==================================
Mathieu Plourde, MBA
Project Leader, LMS/Educational Technologist
IT Client Support & Services
mathieu@udel.edu
Office: 302-831-4060
==================================
IT Support Center: http://www.udel.edu/help
Sakai@UD Support and Training: http://www.udel.edu/sakai/training
Open Education at UD Blog: http://sites.udel.edu/open/


Message from vasquez@sbcc.edu

Members,
 
I am new to this list but while everyone is thinking about challenges I 'd like to send the following link that gives pause for any decisions that campuses make re: emerging technology and e-textbooks.  The Senate hearing yesterday provides background and further information for all campuses to be aware of as more hearings come about.  Also, attaching documents sent in the last year from Dept. of Education and Justice department.  Hope this adds to the conversation.  Listening to everyone's ideas and thoughts about the future of campus technology is a challenge for all of us.
 
The U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions hearing
The Promise of Accessible Technology: Challenges and Opportunities
Tuesday, February 7
 
Laurie Vasquez
Assistive Technology Specialist
Chair, Instructional Technology Committee
Santa Barbara City College

>>> Marty Ringle <ringle@REED.EDU> 2/3/2012 3:29 PM >>>
Mathieu-

You've hit the nail on the head.  I see this as potentially the biggest challenge we face.  Unless we can collectively pressure publishers, distributors, and eReader vendors to pursue a standards-based (or at least a file format inter-operability) approach, fragmentation among eBooks and other digital materials will quickly become a nightmare for students and faculty and the potential utility of eBooks will languish indefinitely.

Marty  

=================================
Martin Ringle, Chief Technology Officer   
Reed College, Portland, OR 97202          
503-777-7254   email:   ringle@reed.edu                             
=================================

Hi Laurie-

Many thanks for sharing this link.  Apropos of the focus of the video:  We are keenly aware of the issue of accessibility as it relates to eReaders.  As one of the schools that participated in the Amazon Kindle Pilot Study a couple of years ago, Reed spent a great deal of time in conversations with the Dept. of Justice and the National Federation for the Blind (NFB) about ways to ensure that accessibility not be overlooked when considering or adopting new technologies.  Case in point:  A few months ago we began looking at the eReader offering from Kno ( www.kno.com/ ).  It looked very promising and we were considering a pilot.  But after checking with the NFB we learned that it was not accessible to the visually impaired.  We questioned Kno about this and were informed that accessibility features were in the works and would be delivered sometime next year.  We decided to defer the pilot until the software was fully compliant.  If colleges and universities routinely require new products to be ADA compliant, vendors may eventually treat this as a design priority.  

Marty 

=================================
Martin Ringle, Chief Technology Officer   
Reed College, Portland, OR 97202          
503-777-7254   email:   ringle@reed.edu                             
=================================

The reality is none of these systems are 100 percent accessible for all students.  Even NFB's own ereader software Blio has it's shortcomings according to a recent article in NFB's magazine.  And I might add was rolled out to colleges and universities through Baker and Taylor and NFB before all those issues were fully addressed.  College stores have been partnering with baker and Taylor and blio along with most of the other major platforms for several years now.  

Whether it is cafescribe, nook study, kno, inkling, or coursesmart among others they are all working on this.  Many are working to build in accessibility into design from the beggining of the design of their new software they will be rolling out in the next 12 months are so.  They have been working with folks at CSU, NFB, AFB and Georgia tech among other experts.  As NFB's testimony in the Senate discussed its not just the software but also the hardware and don't forget the content.  The content side is a significant challenge as evident by the hard work going on in the STEPP textbook rental grant at Georgia Tech.  Disclosure I am on their advisory committee.   May surprise you to kow most etextbooks are delivered to these vendors from publishers as PDF and then have to be enhanced to address accessibility.   Progress is being made by publishes in this regard.   Everyone have work to do in this important space.  We still have a ways to go. 

As to the Kindle DX pilots accessibility was not the only issue.  The larger screen e ink ereader devises were never designed for modern course materials let alone most traditional college textbooks which feature rich color graphics.  

Sent from my mobile phone. 

Richard Hershman
Vice President of Government Relations
National Association of College Stores

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