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It would be nice to have a "pulse check" on how eTexts are faring this year:

Are you seeing an uptick in use of eTexts at your institution?  
If so, what areas of the curriculum seem to be in the forefront?   
If not, what do you see as the primary adoption barrier(s)?

Thanks!

Marty

=================================
Martin Ringle, Chief Information Officer   
Reed College, Portland, OR 97202          
503-777-7254   email:   ringle@reed.edu                           
=================================

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

No change for us.  Mostly due to the cost of the eTexts—still too high for what you get.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dr. Roger Von Holzen

Director--Distance Learning Services

Director--Center for Information Technology in Education

Director--Textbook Services

Northwest Missouri State University

246 Owens Library

Maryville, MO 64468

660-562-1532

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Message from plebar@allegheny.edu

Hi Marty. I'm the bookstore manager at Allegheny College, a small (2200) traditional 4-year liberal-arts institution somewhat similar to yours. (Although of course I use the word 'traditional' in conjunction with Reed advisedly ;)

No uptick at all in e-texts per se. We've had a total of 3 adoptions over the last 2 years, and 2 of them were for the same music course in subsequent semesters. I have yet to have a student ask me where he/she can get an eText version of a printed text we're stocking.

We have seen a mild upsurge in usage of the shrink-wrapped bundles that combine a printed text with a web access code, e.g. Pearson's MyLab.  Social sciences - particularly Econ - are our heaviest users, but it's still less than 5% of overall text sales.

My intuitive hunch is that faculty inertia is probably the number one barrier to wider adoption. Some of the more senior faculty may be actively opposed, but for the most part I believe that without any student demand or administrative pressure they see no reason to change what's been working for them. Two other major hurdles, IMO: 1) eTexts at the college level need to be more than just .pdfs of the printed text, but most of the big publishers have yet to provide a truly enhanced product for standalone e-versions of their major textbooks; and 2) lack of a unified format. I have had a number of parents ask me about eTexts, and as soon as I start talking about the various caveats involved I can see the eyes begin to glaze over....which I would guess explains why their kids aren't asking for them in my store.

Pete LeBar
Marty, I am coordinating an eText pilot study at UW-Milwaukee sponsored by Educause and I2. Apart from the 450 or so students in program, there has been only slight increase in the use of eTexts on campus. I agree with Roger that the costs of eTexts is not low enough to promote wider use. I am hoping that training our pilot participant instructors in techniques to use the eText to engage students more with textbook content will be a pedadogic driver of wider use (with cost savings being a secondary consideration/benefit). Gerry Gerald Bergtrom, Ph.D. Professor of Biological Sciences (Emeritus) & Instructional Design Consultant Learning Technology Center Golda Meier Library E175 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee P.O. Box 604 Milwaukee, WI 53201-0604 www.LTC.uwm.edu 414 229-4319 (office) 414 229-6758 (fax)
Hi,
I don't believe eTexts are the innovation as much as the licensing on open textbooks.

The licensing allows institutions to take control of their own content - in price and customization.

We have no plans to move towards eTexts. But we are encouraging faculty to look into open textbooks. You may have seen our Open Academics textbook catalog of open textbooks (http://open.umn.edu).

We have some adoption strategies that I would be happy to discuss with anyone who is interested. We will have at least four adoptions this year (saving students many thousands of dollars).

Thanks,
-Dave

-- 
David Ernst, Ph.D.
Director, Academic and Information Technology
College of Education and Human Development
University of Minnesota
telephone :: 612-624-2760
email :: dernst@umn.edu
twitter :: @dernst


Marty et al,

 

IU is seeing an uptick in our 2nd full semester of having our eTexts model rolled out (following five semesters of pilots 2009-).

 

We had 135 sections and 4,752 students in the spring semester and 216 sections and 7,536 students this fall semester.  These numbers were before Pearson, Elsevier Science and Technology, and some other publishers joined.  We are not seeing any particular concentration as faculty adoptions are in languages, sciences, professional schools, etc.

 

I have been in several conversations in the last weeks where more institutions are considering how to move beyond their early pilots to scalable models.

 

Nik Osborne recently had an article in Ed Tech Magazine that outlines our approach and some of what we have learned including approaches for open content and faculty course packs. 

 

http://www.edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2012/10/best-both-worlds-indiana-university-pioneers-e-textbook-model

 

Our view is that as the technologies an content evolve, we need to collectively keep pressing for co-evolution of productive business models for the path to digital (+print).  We have lots of links and FAQs at our university-wide info sit at http://etexts.iu.edu.

 

Cheers - Brad

----------------------------------------------------------------------

IU Vice President for IT & CIO, Dean, and Professor

Indiana University, http://ovpit.iu.edu 

 

 

 

 

Message from ted.dodds@cornell.edu

Marty, I think the general thread of responses to your inquiry is indicative of a chicken-and-egg situation that can best be addressed by the demand aggregation strategy behind the EDUCAUSE and Internet2/Net+ etext pilots. If the cost of etexts is considered to be too high, what can we do to lower them? Working in concert as a community, with purposeful limited-duration pilots, strikes me as a very rational plan of action. That's why Cornell has participated in the two etext pilots - the handful of schools who were involved last spring, and the larger pilot put together this fall by EDUCAUSE and Internet2/Net+. We have signaled our intent to participate in a third pilot in January. We are gaining valuable experience through these pilots. Our faculty and students are happy with their experiences with etexts. Overall, the pilots are preparing us for the inevitable tipping point when etexts are the norm. So in addition to acknowledging that the etext market is not yet where we'd all like it to be, I think it's important to emphasize what we can do - and are doing - to influence that market for the benefit of our students and our institutions. ...Ted
+1 for Ted's comments. We were in first 2 and have committed to the spring pilot. NetPlus gives us the only hope for leverage we have, both on price and accessibility. We are not going to see huge uptake in the initial 2 years, in my view. But it will reach a tipping point in the near future and we need to have established leverage by then. Bruce. Bruce Maas CIO and Vice Provost for Information Technology University of Wisconsin-Madison 2112 Computer Sciences Building 1210 W Dayton St. Madison WI 53706 608-262-4679 www.cio.wisc.edu
I applaud the leadership role Minnesota  (and California) are playing here.  Yet another highly viable option.  Thanks David.

Bruce Maas
CIO and Vice Provost for Information Technology
University of Wisconsin-Madison
2112 Computer Sciences Building
1210 W Dayton St.
Madison WI 53706
608-262-4679

On Oct 22, 2012, at 3:06 PM, David Ernst <dernst@UMN.EDU> wrote:

I don't believe eTexts are the innovation as much as the licensing on open textbooks.

The licensing allows institutions to take control of their own content - in price and customization.

We have no plans to move towards eTexts. But we are encouraging faculty to look into open textbooks. You may have seen our Open Academics textbook catalog of open textbooks (http://open.umn.edu).

We have some adoption strategies that I would be happy to discuss with anyone who is interested. We will have at least four adoptions this year (saving students many thousands of dollars).

Thanks,
-Dave

-- 
David Ernst, Ph.D.
Director, Academic and Information Technology
College of Education and Human Development
University of Minnesota
telephone :: 612-624-2760
email :: dernst@umn.edu
twitter :: @dernst


Message from ron@ahead.org

I assume by accessibility you mean availability to the general student population, not accessibility as usable by folks who require assistive technologies to access digital content. This term gets used interchangeably to the detriment of the populations with disabilities. Ron Stewart -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE eTexts Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Bruce Maas Sent: Monday, October 22, 2012 5:53 PM To: ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] eText adoption - reply requested +1 for Ted's comments. We were in first 2 and have committed to the spring pilot. NetPlus gives us the only hope for leverage we have, both on price and accessibility. We are not going to see huge uptake in the initial 2 years, in my view. But it will reach a tipping point in the near future and we need to have established leverage by then. Bruce. Bruce Maas CIO and Vice Provost for Information Technology University of Wisconsin-Madison 2112 Computer Sciences Building 1210 W Dayton St. Madison WI 53706 608-262-4679 www.cio.wisc.edu
I'll let Bruce Maas confirm my supposition, but I believe that accessibility refers to students with special needs, since it was a major concern expressed at a recent state-wide WI conference panel session with Bruce in attendance. Here at UW-M, there is recognition that eTexts are not yet ready for most mobile technologies, so device accessibility also remains a concern. I think that eText readers, aggregators and publishers are inching forward, driven I think by institution and end-user demand... but not fast enough! A big issue for me is how and when the many useful learning tools (progressive quizzing and other learning exercises) provided by publishers will eventually be integrated with their eTexts. Gerald Bergtrom, Ph.D. Professor of Biological Sciences (Emeritus) & Instructional Design Consultant Learning Technology Center Golda Meier Library E175 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee P.O. Box 604 Milwaukee, WI 53201-0604 www.LTC.uwm.edu 414 229-4319 (office) 414 229-6758 (fax) ----- Original Message ----- From: "Ron Stewart" To: ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Sent: Monday, October 22, 2012 6:54:47 PM Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] eText adoption - reply requested I assume by accessibility you mean availability to the general student population, not accessibility as usable by folks who require assistive technologies to access digital content. This term gets used interchangeably to the detriment of the populations with disabilities. Ron Stewart -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE eTexts Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Bruce Maas Sent: Monday, October 22, 2012 5:53 PM To: ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] eText adoption - reply requested +1 for Ted's comments. We were in first 2 and have committed to the spring pilot. NetPlus gives us the only hope for leverage we have, both on price and accessibility. We are not going to see huge uptake in the initial 2 years, in my view. But it will reach a tipping point in the near future and we need to have established leverage by then. Bruce. Bruce Maas CIO and Vice Provost for Information Technology University of Wisconsin-Madison 2112 Computer Sciences Building 1210 W Dayton St. Madison WI 53706 608-262-4679 www.cio.wisc.edu
Gerry, you have captured this well. The key issue so far is that accessibility has not been a design consideration for most content and technology services providers. This is where we need to take a leadership role. I remain convinced that I2 NetPlus is a way to drive the importance of accessibility in design. In the short term, working together with content and technology service providers to address shortcomings in design seems a prudent interim step. Bruce. Bruce Maas CIO and Vice Provost for Information Technology University of Wisconsin-Madison 2112 Computer Sciences Building Madison, WI 53706 608-262-5381 bruce.maas@cio.wisc.edu On Oct 23, 2012, at 7:31, Gerald K Bergtrom wrote: > I'll let Bruce Maas confirm my supposition, but I believe that accessibility refers to students with special needs, since it was a major concern expressed at a recent state-wide WI conference panel session with Bruce in attendance. Here at UW-M, there is recognition that eTexts are not yet ready for most mobile technologies, so device accessibility also remains a concern. I think that eText readers, aggregators and publishers are inching forward, driven I think by institution and end-user demand... but not fast enough! > > A big issue for me is how and when the many useful learning tools (progressive quizzing and other learning exercises) provided by publishers will eventually be integrated with their eTexts. > > > Gerald Bergtrom, Ph.D. > Professor of Biological Sciences (Emeritus) & > Instructional Design Consultant > Learning Technology Center > Golda Meier Library E175 > University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee > P.O. Box 604 > Milwaukee, WI 53201-0604 > www.LTC.uwm.edu > 414 229-4319 (office) > 414 229-6758 (fax) > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Ron Stewart" > To: ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU > Sent: Monday, October 22, 2012 6:54:47 PM > Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] eText adoption - reply requested > > I assume by accessibility you mean availability to the general student > population, not accessibility as usable by folks who require assistive > technologies to access digital content. This term gets used interchangeably > to the detriment of the populations with disabilities. > > Ron Stewart > > -----Original Message----- > From: The EDUCAUSE eTexts Constituent Group Listserv > [mailto:ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Bruce Maas > Sent: Monday, October 22, 2012 5:53 PM > To: ETEXTS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU > Subject: Re: [ETEXTS] eText adoption - reply requested > > +1 for Ted's comments. We were in first 2 and have committed to the spring > pilot. NetPlus gives us the only hope for leverage we have, both on price > and accessibility. We are not going to see huge uptake in the initial 2 > years, in my view. But it will reach a tipping point in the near future and > we need to have established leverage by then. Bruce. > > Bruce Maas > CIO and Vice Provost for Information Technology University of > Wisconsin-Madison > 2112 Computer Sciences Building > 1210 W Dayton St. > Madison WI 53706 > 608-262-4679 > www.cio.wisc.edu > >

Greetings from the University of Kansas.  I’ve inserted some responses to your questions below.

 

Regards,

 

 

Gail M. Schaplowsky, CPM*

Manager, Administrative Services

The University of Kansas

Information Technology

Computer Services Facility

1001 Sunnyside Avenue

Lawrence, KS  66045-7652

www.technology.ku.edu

gschaplowsky@ku.edu

785.864.0206

*Certified Public Manager

 

 

 

My thanks for all who responded to my query about eText adoption.  It's quite interesting to see the impact that institutional initiatives such as the EDUCAUSE/I2 pilot are having on uptake.

Shifting from eText consumption to production, I have another "pulse check" question:

Are your faculty at your institution devoting more time to the creation of digital content for courses and, if so, what tools are getting the most traction?  For example, are tools like Apple's iBooksAuthor gaining acceptance?

Thanks!

Marty
=================================
Martin Ringle, Chief Information Officer   
Reed College, Portland, OR 97202          
503-777-7254   email:   ringle@reed.edu                           
=================================

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