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What processes do you have in place related to retiring classroom VCRs? We will not be replacing our VCR/DVD combo units when they fail and have already heard concerns from a couple faculty who have relied on VHS tapes for years (not an unfamiliar story). Anyway, who (position title and office/dept.) will help your faculty convert VHS tapes to a digital format? Copyright issues you’ve considered? What equipment are you using to convert VHS to DVD (or file)?

 

Thanks,

Scott

 

Scott Robison, Ph.D.
Director, Learning Technologies and Online Education
Co-Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
105 Lamson Learning Commons, MSC #47B
Plymouth State University
Plymouth, NH  03264
603.535.2262

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

We converted most of ours years ago (actually ¾” tape). We had a staff member in Informatics who converted all of them, about 850 videos – I think it took her nearly a year, and she was doing other things as well. We had made all these videos of dental procedures, so we owned copyright (and we then decided to publish them on YouTube and offer them as open educational resources – they’ve had over 13 million views since 2009).

 

Nowadays, if people still have a random video, our in-house video person (or trained student worker) does the conversion.

 

As I recall, you can transfer commercial VHS to digital format with no copyright issues if you then retire the tape. Would have to find you a source on that, though.

 

Emily

 

Hi Scott,

 

We have had a similar situation happen here at Rush University. We don’t manage the classrooms but one day about 6 months ago, all of the VHS players and TVs were taken out of the classrooms. Luckily my department has some combo units for checkout.  We have also been weeding our VHS collection and so far have not heard a lot of complaints from either students or faculty. For those tapes that we do not own the copyright, we have had to contact the publisher/vendor to get permission to convert it to a different format. I just saw Emily’s response as well and I would be very interested to know if we could avoid the hassle of copyright conversations if we retired the tape. Some publishers want exorbitant amounts of money to convert to a different format.


Max

 

Scott - 

Check out the Blackmagic Intensity: http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/intensity/

Capturing from analog sources can be hit or miss depending on a lot of 1930's technology (yes – 1930's). Without boring you to death, analog video requires an electronic "drumbeat" (blackburst) in order to synchronize the outgoing video signal, its color reference, and frame rate with that of the digitizing station. 

In the pro world, every input device and digitizing station has blackburst running through all the video gear so that there is a unified sync between all devices. Without blackburst, I don't know how they get a clean sync in VHS input, but they must have figured something out.

Anyway, if you are interested in the total process for how this works, contact me. This was my prior career so I've done it just about every wrong way possible ;-)

Thx – Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist/Online Instructor
Granite State College
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate


From: Scott Robison <sarobison@MAIL.PLYMOUTH.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv <INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, September 9, 2013 4:53 PM
To: "INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [INSTTECH] The Autumn of VHS Tapes...

What processes do you have in place related to retiring classroom VCRs? We will not be replacing our VCR/DVD combo units when they fail and have already heard concerns from a couple faculty who have relied on VHS tapes for years (not an unfamiliar story). Anyway, who (position title and office/dept.) will help your faculty convert VHS tapes to a digital format? Copyright issues you’ve considered? What equipment are you using to convert VHS to DVD (or file)?

 

Thanks,

Scott

 

Scott Robison, Ph.D.
Director, Learning Technologies and Online Education
Co-Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
105 Lamson Learning Commons, MSC #47B
Plymouth State University
Plymouth, NH  03264
603.535.2262

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Hello Scott -

We began the VHS "sunset" process last year - any new classroom install or upgrade will no longer come with a combo deck.  Along with the retirement of the decks, we've seen increasing numbers of faculty make use of our digitizing services for both online instruction and use through Blackboard.  This has come in concert with deploying a lecture capture system (Camtasia Relay) in many of our larger lecture spaces.  Right now we use a combination of Handbrake and Final Cut, including a TBC, to assist with the digitizing process (which has included VHS tapes, 16mm film, and other media).  I've found Sorenson Squeeze to be the best for file format output. 

When faculty come in to drop off their media, we have a digitizing request form that they need to fill out that includes information on copyright that they have to sign off.  We've found this works very well to go over the process with them and make sure they understand what the workflow will be.

-Rich


***********************
Rich Bakken, PhD
Coordinator, Media Production & Special Events
Instructional Technology Services
San Diego State University
O: (619) 594-2047

From: Scott Robison <sarobison@MAIL.PLYMOUTH.EDU>
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent: Monday, September 9, 2013 1:53 PM
Subject: [INSTTECH] The Autumn of VHS Tapes...

What processes do you have in place related to retiring classroom VCRs? We will not be replacing our VCR/DVD combo units when they fail and have already heard concerns from a couple faculty who have relied on VHS tapes for years (not an unfamiliar story). Anyway, who (position title and office/dept.) will help your faculty convert VHS tapes to a digital format? Copyright issues you’ve considered? What equipment are you using to convert VHS to DVD (or file)?
 
Thanks,
Scott
 
Scott Robison, Ph.D.
Director, Learning Technologies and Online Education
Co-Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
105 Lamson Learning Commons, MSC #47B
Plymouth State University
Plymouth, NH  03264
603.535.2262
 
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

To add to Rich's post, a TBC is a Timebase Corrector, which is a specialty video device that digitizes and synchronizes all of the analog signal components into something solid and reliable for digitizing.  The TBC is synchronized to blackburst so that it works with the digitizing system.

The reason this matters is because it borders on the video engineering side of knowledge, which pushes this whole archiving effort towards a silo of expertise, as opposed to something you could teach "civilians" to do (like encoding).

- Steve

Hi All- We are coming up against this also, so this info is great.

Can I throw out an additional question: has anyone had any success capturing closed captions off of VHS tapes during the digitization process? Any tips appreciated on this one.

Thanks!

Asha
-- 


Asha Kinney 
Assistant Director of IT - Technology for Teaching and Learning 
Hampshire College 
413-559-6238 
akinney@hampshire.edu 
Read the blog: http://blog.hampshire.edu/ttl/
Schedule an Appointment: http://ashak.youcanbook.me/



From: Scott Robison <sarobison@MAIL.PLYMOUTH.EDU>
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent: Monday, September 9, 2013 1:53 PM
Subject: [INSTTECH] The Autumn of VHS Tapes...

What processes do you have in place related to retiring classroom VCRs? We will not be replacing our VCR/DVD combo units when they fail and have already heard concerns from a couple faculty who have relied on VHS tapes for years (not an unfamiliar story). Anyway, who (position title and office/dept.) will help your faculty convert VHS tapes to a digital format? Copyright issues you’ve considered? What equipment are you using to convert VHS to DVD (or file)?
 
Thanks,
Scott
 
Scott Robison, Ph.D.
Director, Learning Technologies and Online Education
Co-Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
105 Lamson Learning Commons, MSC #47B
Plymouth State University
Plymouth, NH  03264
603.535.2262
 
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We're coming up against it too. We don't have answers about how the digitizing will happen, we're still wrestling with the copyright concerns and who will do it. A great resource we've been looking at is NYU's Video At Risk project - they have interesting copyright guidance here: http://www.nyu.edu/tisch/preservation/research/video-risk/VideoAtRisk_SE... Jenn Stevens Director | Instructional Technology Group | 403A Walker Building | Emerson College | 120 Boylston St | Boston MA 02116 | (617) 824-3093 ________________________________

Here is an excerpt of a paper about the TEACH Act by Kenneth Crews (Columbia University Copyright Advisory Office), which is also attached:

 

5. Converting analog materials to digital formats. Troublesome to many copyright

owners was the prospect that their analog materials would be converted to digital formats,

and hence made susceptible to easy downloading and dissemination. Some copyright

owners have held steadfast against permitting digitization in order to control uses of their

copyrighted materials. The TEACH Act includes a prohibition against the conversion of

materials from analog into digital formats, except under the following circumstances:

• The amount that may be converted is limited to the amount of appropriate works

that may be performed or displayed, pursuant to the revised Section 110(2); and

• A digital version of the work is not “available to the institution,” or a digital

version is available, but it is secured behind technological protection measures

that prevent its availability for a distance-education program.

 

We’ve been interpreting the TEACH Act to say we need to purchase the digital version (usually DVD) if it is available, otherwise, we can convert the analog (tape) to digital format.

 

Scott

 

Scott Robison, Ph.D.
Director, Learning Technologies and Online Education
Co-Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
105 Lamson Learning Commons, MSC #47B
Plymouth State University
Plymouth, NH  03264
603.535.2262

 

 

 

 

The digitizing process captures the entire signal, including the caption data in the off-screen scan lines (line 21, or vertical interval blanking). Displaying closed captioning from an analog source is a matter of the device you display it on. So if you play it back from a DVD on a conventional TV monitor, the TV monitor should have its captioning activated. (Be sure your DVD author is aware of caption data in the signal to avoid having it stripped off. A test is in order first).

Since a computer monitor does not decode caption data in off-screen scan lines, you are out of luck if you plan to stream your program online. Is there some kind of decoding plugin for this? I'll bet there is something in Telestream's Episode application for this. Worth a look.

I haven't done this process from beginning to end, so I can't guarantee that it will work. But conceptually, the data flow should accommodate it.

- Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist/Online Instructor
Granite State College
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate




From: Asha Kinney <akinney@HAMPSHIRE.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv <INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 8:52 AM
To: "INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] The Autumn of VHS Tapes...

Hi All- We are coming up against this also, so this info is great.

Can I throw out an additional question: has anyone had any success capturing closed captions off of VHS tapes during the digitization process? Any tips appreciated on this one.

Thanks!

Asha
-- 


Asha Kinney 
Assistant Director of IT - Technology for Teaching and Learning 
Hampshire College 
413-559-6238 
akinney@hampshire.edu 
Read the blog: http://blog.hampshire.edu/ttl/
Schedule an Appointment: http://ashak.youcanbook.me/



From: Scott Robison <sarobison@MAIL.PLYMOUTH.EDU>
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent: Monday, September 9, 2013 1:53 PM
Subject: [INSTTECH] The Autumn of VHS Tapes...

What processes do you have in place related to retiring classroom VCRs? We will not be replacing our VCR/DVD combo units when they fail and have already heard concerns from a couple faculty who have relied on VHS tapes for years (not an unfamiliar story). Anyway, who (position title and office/dept.) will help your faculty convert VHS tapes to a digital format? Copyright issues you’ve considered? What equipment are you using to convert VHS to DVD (or file)?
 
Thanks,
Scott
 
Scott Robison, Ph.D.
Director, Learning Technologies and Online Education
Co-Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
105 Lamson Learning Commons, MSC #47B
Plymouth State University
Plymouth, NH  03264
603.535.2262
 
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Good morning all - I've had a few inquiries about the request form, and am happy to share what we use.  Please see attached (and know that we are still tweaking it as needed!). 

-Rich



This is a great resource! Thanks, Jenn. Likewise guidelines from the University of Michigan. See the very bottom of this page. http://guides.lib.umich.edu/content.php?pid=396670&sid=3248182 >
Scott - 

One possible solution is to buy/rent a realtime DVD recorder and dub from VHS to DVD (there's probably a single unit that does this). Your quality ranges may be less than ideal compared to a digitizing process via Final Cut Pro/Premiere Pro + an black box of some kind, but it will be presentable.

From there, I suggest copying off the raw DVD files directly from the root directory of the DVD for archival purposes. Since it is not encrypted, no illegal de-encrytion is needed.

From the raw DVD files, use Handbrake, Cinematize, or MPEG Streamclip to extract the proprietary DVD VOB files to single-file objects. Be sure to de-interlace standard def sources for streaming media files.

Anyone who would like to chat with me about options, please fell free to contact me directly.

Thx – Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist/Online Instructor
Granite State College
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate


On 9/10/13 10:35 AM, "Emily Springfield" <espring@UMICH.EDU> wrote:

This is a great resource! Thanks, Jenn. Likewise guidelines from the
University of Michigan. See the very bottom of this page.


Something that worked well at UIC, when I was directing Teaching & Learning Technologies was lending out a bunch of easy-to-use DVD burners to faculty and departments to keep for a week or longer, to transfer/copy their own VHS tapes or anything else they could connect to the RCA or S-Video input plugs of the $200 DVD burners, at their convenience, at their home or office, whenever they had time. All they had to do was/is connecting a video tape deck, sticking a blank DVD disc on the burner and hitting the Play button. I always bought Sony DVD burners, btw.

We also send faculty and departments to outsource the video conversion to a couple of outfits in the area. One such business that I recommend for all sorts of image and video transfers, editing, etc, is La Grange Camera, in La Grange, Illinois. They do fabulous work, their prices are very reasonable, and they take orders from all over the U.S.

Greetings from Chicago,

--- Ed Garay
IPad.

Hi Ed,

 

Thanks for the info. When you loaned out the DVD burners, were faculty responsible for complying with copyright regulations?

 

Thanks,

Scott

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Ed Garay
Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 11:35 AM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] The Autumn of VHS Tapes...

 

Something that worked well at UIC, when I was directing Teaching & Learning Technologies was lending out a bunch of easy-to-use DVD burners to faculty and departments to keep for a week or longer, to transfer/copy their own VHS tapes or anything else they could connect to the RCA or S-Video input plugs of the $200 DVD burners, at their convenience, at their home or office, whenever they had time. All they had to do was/is connecting a video tape deck, sticking a blank DVD disc on the burner and hitting the Play button. I always bought Sony DVD burners, btw.

 

We also send faculty and departments to outsource the video conversion to a couple of outfits in the area. One such business that I recommend for all sorts of image and video transfers, editing, etc, is La Grange Camera, in La Grange, Illinois. They do fabulous work, their prices are very reasonable, and they take orders from all over the U.S.

 

Greetings from Chicago,

--- Ed Garay

IPad.


Yes, they were, I mean, to the extend that they would comply with copyright laws for any other type of multimedia conversion, such as running Camtasia Studio, Audacity or some such whole playing a copyrighted movie, song or watching a live Webcast. We did (do) make a point of reminding them copyright and intellectual property, FERPA compliance, HIPAA, and all, whenever we can, especially, when we lend them out or use reproduction equipment and software of our Instructional Technology Labs.

It helps that UIC Academic Computing works very closely with the Library. In fact, the biggest Instructional Technology Lab *is* in the UIC Main Library's new IDEA Commons.  The Library has a number of resources to assist faculty with acquiring copyright permissions, etc.

--- Ed Garay
IPad.

Message from clantz@glendale.edu

Greetings,

I have a couple super VHS decks and a media converter unit that have been gathering dust in storage that I would be happy to donate to a school if they wanted to pay shipping on them. They are professional edit decks for SVHS video (and VHS) and work fine but are getting old, so at some point the rubber parts may need to be replaced.

 

 

Connie Lantz

Instructional Technology Support Specialist

Faculty Center for Learning and Teaching, SF 101

Glendale Community College, CA

clantz@glendale.edu

818-240-1000 ext 3457, 3458

Online Classes

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Scott Robison
Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 9:07 AM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] The Autumn of VHS Tapes...

 

Hi Ed,

 

Thanks for the info. When you loaned out the DVD burners, were faculty responsible for complying with copyright regulations?

 

Thanks,

Scott

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Ed Garay
Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 11:35 AM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] The Autumn of VHS Tapes...

 

Something that worked well at UIC, when I was directing Teaching & Learning Technologies was lending out a bunch of easy-to-use DVD burners to faculty and departments to keep for a week or longer, to transfer/copy their own VHS tapes or anything else they could connect to the RCA or S-Video input plugs of the $200 DVD burners, at their convenience, at their home or office, whenever they had time. All they had to do was/is connecting a video tape deck, sticking a blank DVD disc on the burner and hitting the Play button. I always bought Sony DVD burners, btw.

 

We also send faculty and departments to outsource the video conversion to a couple of outfits in the area. One such business that I recommend for all sorts of image and video transfers, editing, etc, is La Grange Camera, in La Grange, Illinois. They do fabulous work, their prices are very reasonable, and they take orders from all over the U.S.

 

Greetings from Chicago,

--- Ed Garay

IPad.


Anyone interested in this gear should request a test to see that it is fully functional. I picked up a s-vhs deck with high hopes for an archiving project and found that it did not feed tapes properly. Repair costs are prohibitively expensive – especially for SONY pro gear (fuhgettaboutit!!). Had to junk it. They stopped making s-vhs decks probably in the mid-1990s when Beta-SP took over as the defacto pro format, so consider that the most use you will get out of it might be a day or a year if you are lucky.

Pro edit decks are more complex and require know-how to setup and configure with software. Beware! These are not garden variety VHS decks.

- Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist/Online Instructor
Granite State College
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate


From: Constance Lantz <clantz@GLENDALE.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv <INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 12:59 PM
To: "INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] The Autumn of VHS Tapes...

Greetings,

I have a couple super VHS decks and a media converter unit that have been gathering dust in storage that I would be happy to donate to a school if they wanted to pay shipping on them. They are professional edit decks for SVHS video (and VHS) and work fine but are getting old, so at some point the rubber parts may need to be replaced.

 

 

Connie Lantz

Instructional Technology Support Specialist

Faculty Center for Learning and Teaching, SF 101

Glendale Community College, CA

clantz@glendale.edu

818-240-1000 ext 3457, 3458

Online Classes

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Scott Robison
Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 9:07 AM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] The Autumn of VHS Tapes...

 

Hi Ed,

 

Thanks for the info. When you loaned out the DVD burners, were faculty responsible for complying with copyright regulations?

 

Thanks,

Scott

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Ed Garay
Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 11:35 AM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] The Autumn of VHS Tapes...

 

Something that worked well at UIC, when I was directing Teaching & Learning Technologies was lending out a bunch of easy-to-use DVD burners to faculty and departments to keep for a week or longer, to transfer/copy their own VHS tapes or anything else they could connect to the RCA or S-Video input plugs of the $200 DVD burners, at their convenience, at their home or office, whenever they had time. All they had to do was/is connecting a video tape deck, sticking a blank DVD disc on the burner and hitting the Play button. I always bought Sony DVD burners, btw.

 

We also send faculty and departments to outsource the video conversion to a couple of outfits in the area. One such business that I recommend for all sorts of image and video transfers, editing, etc, is La Grange Camera, in La Grange, Illinois. They do fabulous work, their prices are very reasonable, and they take orders from all over the U.S.

 

Greetings from Chicago,

--- Ed Garay

IPad.


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