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"How can technology reduce or improve faculty workload now and long term?" is the question my President asked me to explore.  Below are my initial thoughts and I wondered if there were some universally applicable paradigms or ways of doing that could benefit all faculty on our campuses, where there is little time, most feel overworked and underpaid?  I include my initial thoughts below, but would like your insight, given that this group always peppers the ether with gems. . . Nick : )


Do a SWOT analysis survey of what faculty want and need right away.

 

Make the Internet and computers easier to access and work with.

 

Move to web based and free productivity tools like Google apps for education with a built in eportfolio piece.  This could also reduce costs.

 

Automate the recording and distribution of lectures.

 

Teach larger classes with online components and use Grad students or facilitators to pick up some discussion and grading activities.

 

Use blogs or other tool to put content online that may be standardized so material is always there for use and maintained, both original and oer< by faculty groups in consult with library, etc.

 

Perhaps reduce emphasis upon email, moving more toward text and im with google apps.  Make advising students more community based using google groups or other forums to establish cohorts that staff monitor and advise, as opposed to faculty.

 

Give faculty promotion and tenure credit for online publishing, prepublication, blogging and educational community building.

 

Make expectations of faculty simple and easy to understand.  Any form or process a faculty has to complete, should be accessible via a single web page in the cloud.  Eliminate all paper transactions and simplify all.

 

Hire graduate student workers to be oer curators for each discipline who can work with the library and faculty to maintain Ed resources for use with instruction and research.

 

Once great oer and resources are in place, reduce physical class time by 1/4 or 1/3, having students read and learn about subjects online.  Then use class time for application, discussion and problem solving.  Really stress inverted classroom pedagogy.

 

Relatedly, support the creation of student problem solving and application groups f2f and online that are discipline specific and document or record these sessions.

 

Make it easier to use tech in the classroom:  easier to connect and project and collaborate with students.  Current setups are confusing and overly complex.  



Dr. Nicholas Konrad Langlie
Director of Planning & Policy
Longwood University
201 High Street
Farmville, VA 23909

langlienk@longwood.edu 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

This is a good list of insights. It would be hard for me to add to it in specifics, but I will suggest a philosophical one:

"Employ technologies which establish or reinforce he kinds of foundation skills and experiences which can be used as prior learning for implementing future technology goals."

In other words, make the assumption that whatever platform, procedure, or application you adopt will be become obsolete or surpassed in some way by the next one to come along. The trend, however, is that most successful technologies include a large amount of features and functions of prior technologies. Thus, WordPress is successful (IMO) because its dashboard interface for editing a post is very similar to an email client and to MS Word.

So if you make commitments to, say, Google Docs, it is implicit to faculty in this decision that the institution is establishing a relationship between this technology and the user. In essence, you are saying to faculty, "Get used to this way of doing your work because it will become the vocabulary of future methods for years to come." If you cannot make this statement with certainty, then you may be investing in systems that pull users in the wrong direction towards future goals.

- Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate
Scheduling: tungle.me/steve.granitestate
We’re moving! As of July 1, 2012 the new address will be:
Granite State College, 25 Hall Street Concord, NH 03301




From: "Langlie, Nicholas" <langlienk@LONGWOOD.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv <INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2012 07:59:41 -0400
To: <INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [INSTTECH] How can technology reduce or improve faculty workload now and long term?

"How can technology reduce or improve faculty workload now and long term?" is the question my President asked me to explore.  Below are my initial thoughts and I wondered if there were some universally applicable paradigms or ways of doing that could benefit all faculty on our campuses, where there is little time, most feel overworked and underpaid?  I include my initial thoughts below, but would like your insight, given that this group always peppers the ether with gems. . . Nick : )


Do a SWOT analysis survey of what faculty want and need right away.

 

Make the Internet and computers easier to access and work with.

 

Move to web based and free productivity tools like Google apps for education with a built in eportfolio piece.  This could also reduce costs.

 

Automate the recording and distribution of lectures.

 

Teach larger classes with online components and use Grad students or facilitators to pick up some discussion and grading activities.

 

Use blogs or other tool to put content online that may be standardized so material is always there for use and maintained, both original and oer< by faculty groups in consult with library, etc.

 

Perhaps reduce emphasis upon email, moving more toward text and im with google apps.  Make advising students more community based using google groups or other forums to establish cohorts that staff monitor and advise, as opposed to faculty.

 

Give faculty promotion and tenure credit for online publishing, prepublication, blogging and educational community building.

 

Make expectations of faculty simple and easy to understand.  Any form or process a faculty has to complete, should be accessible via a single web page in the cloud.  Eliminate all paper transactions and simplify all.

 

Hire graduate student workers to be oer curators for each discipline who can work with the library and faculty to maintain Ed resources for use with instruction and research.

 

Once great oer and resources are in place, reduce physical class time by 1/4 or 1/3, having students read and learn about subjects online.  Then use class time for application, discussion and problem solving.  Really stress inverted classroom pedagogy.

 

Relatedly, support the creation of student problem solving and application groups f2f and online that are discipline specific and document or record these sessions.

 

Make it easier to use tech in the classroom:  easier to connect and project and collaborate with students.  Current setups are confusing and overly complex.  



Dr. Nicholas Konrad Langlie
Director of Planning & Policy
Longwood University
201 High Street
Farmville, VA 23909

langlienk@longwood.edu 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Lots of wisdom and experience behind these statements, as well as design theory. Worth chewing on and applying to your own situation. Thank you, Steve.
 


 
 
Gail A. Rathbun, Ph.D.
Director, Center for the Enhancement of Learning & Teaching
IPFW
2101 E. Coliseum Blvd.
Fort Wayne, IN  46805
260-481-6504
http://www.ipfw.edu/celt
"Be well. Do good work. Keep in touch." Garrison Keillor>>> "Covello, Steve" <Steve.Covello@GRANITE.EDU> 8/20/2012 9:27 AM >>>
This is a good list of insights. It would be hard for me to add to it in specifics, but I will suggest a philosophical one:

"Employ technologies which establish or reinforce he kinds of foundation skills and experiences which can be used as prior learning for implementing future technology goals."

In other words, make the assumption that whatever platform, procedure, or application you adopt will be become obsolete or surpassed in some way by the next one to come along. The trend, however, is that most successful technologies include a large amount of features and functions of prior technologies. Thus, WordPress is successful (IMO) because its dashboard interface for editing a post is very similar to an email client and to MS Word.

So if you make commitments to, say, Google Docs, it is implicit to faculty in this decision that the institution is establishing a relationship between this technology and the user. In essence, you are saying to faculty, "Get used to this way of doing your work because it will become the vocabulary of future methods for years to come." If you cannot make this statement with certainty, then you may be investing in systems that pull users in the wrong direction towards future goals.

- Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate
Scheduling: tungle.me/steve.granitestate
We’re moving! As of July 1, 2012 the new address will be:
Granite State College, 25 Hall Street Concord, NH 03301




From: "Langlie, Nicholas" <langlienk@LONGWOOD.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv <INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2012 07:59:41 -0400
To: <INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [INSTTECH] How can technology reduce or improve faculty workload now and long term?

"How can technology reduce or improve faculty workload now and long term?" is the question my President asked me to explore.  Below are my initial thoughts and I wondered if there were some universally applicable paradigms or ways of doing that could benefit all faculty on our campuses, where there is little time, most feel overworked and underpaid?  I include my initial thoughts below, but would like your insight, given that this group always peppers the ether with gems. . . Nick : )


Do a SWOT analysis survey of what faculty want and need right away.

Make the Internet and computers easier to access and work with.

Move to web based and free productivity tools like Google apps for education with a built in eportfolio piece.  This could also reduce costs.

Automate the recording and distribution of lectures.

Teach larger classes with online components and use Grad students or facilitators to pick up some discussion and grading activities.

Use blogs or other tool to put content online that may be standardized so material is always there for use and maintained, both original and oer< by faculty groups in consult with library, etc.

Perhaps reduce emphasis upon email, moving more toward text and im with google apps.  Make advising students more community based using google groups or other forums to establish cohorts that staff monitor and advise, as opposed to faculty.

Give faculty promotion and tenure credit for online publishing, prepublication, blogging and educational community building.

Make expectations of faculty simple and easy to understand.  Any form or process a faculty has to complete, should be accessible via a single web page in the cloud.  Eliminate all paper transactions and simplify all.

Hire graduate student workers to be oer curators for each discipline who can work with the library and faculty to maintain Ed resources for use with instruction and research.

Once great oer and resources are in place, reduce physical class time by 1/4 or 1/3, having students read and learn about subjects online.  Then use class time for application, discussion and problem solving.  Really stress inverted classroom pedagogy.

Relatedly, support the creation of student problem solving and application groups f2f and online that are discipline specific and document or record these sessions.

Make it easier to use tech in the classroom:  easier to connect and project and collaborate with students.  Current setups are confusing and overly complex.  



Dr. Nicholas Konrad Langlie
Director of Planning & Policy
Longwood University
201 High Street
Farmville, VA 23909

langlienk@longwood.edu 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Eliminate lectures in some courses. Replace them with online material. Faculty can spend their time in ways that takes advantage of their expertise: one-on-one tutorials, helping teams solve problems, giving feedback.

I'm not talking (typing?) about replacing lectures with narrated PowerPoints, or video recordings of lectures. Instead, things like CoreDogs.Com.

Kieran
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Seems to me that the question, as asked, is a business process question. 
 
Does your president have a baseline of where faculty spend their time?  Is it the same for all faculty?
 
What is the typical workload for adjunct faculty?  Assistant?  Associate?  Full?
 
What is the desired outcome?  That faculty be able to increase their teaching load?  Increase their research time?
 
I was struck by this opinion piece earlier this month:
 
 
How we apply technology to the teaching mission of the college or university depends greatly on what we understand teaching to be. 
 
Brian Burchett
Manager, Learning Space/OIT
University of Notre Dame
574.631.6503 -- bburchet@nd.edu
 
 
 
GREAT questions, Brian. We can't tell if we are improving unless we know where we started, and where we want to be.

Also, the original question asked how technology can "reduce or improve faculty workload."  I find I have few suggestions for reducing workload using technology, because the low-hanging fruit - computer grading of multiple-choice tests, for example - are already being done...and aren't necessarily the kind of teaching and evaluating we want to do. Many of the suggestions posted so far are excellent uses of technology in learning/teaching, but they will categorically NOT reduce teaching workload. Portfolios, blogs, flipping the classroom - all of these take much more time and involvement on the part of instructors than trotting out last year's lecture and having students take a computer-graded midterm and final.  

So - is the goal is truly to reduce faculty workload at all costs? And are we willing to let anything go? Or are we just looking for a technology to let us do the same things faster?

Emily


The above link is research "Estimating Costs and Time in Instructional Design". Be sure to review the e-Learning Development Time Ratio reference.  Our estimation here at GSC is that it takes five times as much effort (combined time and resources) to create an online course than a classroom-based course. This is assuming that the online course achieves QM standards, involves rich media integration (curated or created), and time for arranging external resources (guest speakers/participants, external webtool configuration i.e. Xtranormal, etc.)

It is part of a larger matrix of ADDIE related ISD resources:


Oblinger's article in Educause: "The Myth about Online Course Development: A Faculty Member Can Individually Develop and Deliver an Effective Online Course.” It articulates how the online instructor, as a course developer, needs a set of specialized skills, which may factor into costs and development time if PD is needed.


"Online Course Development: What Does It Cost?" Breaks down some of the cost categories of developing and delivering an online course. The faculty portion may now be as low as 10 hours of preparation per hour of "seat time equivalent" due to improvements in tools (e.g. LMS), but this does not take into account the bulk of the content development.


This resource was curated by Elizabeth Dalton here at Granite State College. Thanks, Elizabeth!

- Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate
Scheduling: tungle.me/steve.granitestate
We’re moving! As of July 1, 2012 the new address will be:
Granite State College, 25 Hall Street Concord, NH 03301




Greetings Ed Tech-ers!

We are encountering situations here at Granite State where an instructor or a member of our Ed Tech group adopts a third-party webtool for certain tasks or instructional resources, such as voice enhanced slideshows on myBrainshark.com. 

Do any of you have a department or institutional policy for external webtool subscriptions? We see the needs emerging in the following hierarchy:
  • Ed Tech "skunkworks" testing/vetting to determine feasibility, usability, and viability.
  • Instructor pilot testing.
  • Expansion from pilot testing to other leading edge instructors.
  • Broader use by both instructors and students, such as directing students to subscribe to an account to produce something for class (we've experienced this with Xtranormal).
  • Adoption by the institution for internal communication and other needs.
I am mostly interested in the criteria that administrators hold for justifying making a blanket expense rather than piecemeal one-off subscriptions. What are ROI expected for these tools that justify the expense?

Also, what are the levels of authority associated with each tier of the hierarchy that can spend the money to support use at that level? For instance, is a department manager empowered to subscribe only single licenses, but not blanket licenses? Is there a review process to assure FERPA compliance?

thx – Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate
Scheduling: tungle.me/steve.granitestate
We’re moving! As of July 1, 2012 the new address will be:
Granite State College, 25 Hall Street Concord, NH 03301

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Tom - 

There is a significant difference between "flashy content for the sake of content" and information which advances comprehension through visual/auditory media. Given, not all disciplines benefit from, say, demonstration videos or such. But this is a common understanding among media specialists. Technology for technology's sake is not pedagogy.

However, to dismiss ALL non-text media as "flashy" is counterproductive, as is a broad assumption that graduate students are happier when there is no rich media in their course material. Would a Project Management graduate student benefit from watching videos related to conflict management? Or should they just read transcripts? 

The tenets of my mission to help faculty integrate rich media are as follows:
  • Rich media alone do not cause learning. It is the manner by which media in placed in the instructional context and surrounded by inquiry that produces evidence of a learning experience.
  • Each medium has inherent strengths to communicate certain kinds of information. It is the instructor/instructional designer's challenge to align instructional goals with the media that stimulate optimal sensory experiences that learners can process to reach longterm memory.
  • With training, ALL faculty are capable of integrating appropriate rich media into instruction even if all they can do is curate existing media, rather than producing their own original content.
These principles are agnostic to UG or graduate studies, although upper level UG and graduate students may be better capable of processing abstract media (heavily symbolic, rather than concrete experiences) than less experienced learners on a subject.

IMHO, the effort put into curating or producing effective rich media is worth the development premium if it expands the perspectives available to students, and utilizes multiple modes of information processing. Rich media is not the be-all and end-all of teaching online. It is, however, a powerful tool when integrated intelligently. 

- Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate
Scheduling: tungle.me/steve.granitestate
We’re moving! As of July 1, 2012 the new address will be:
Granite State College, 25 Hall Street Concord, NH 03301


Well said, Steve.

 

Shahron Williams van Rooij, Ph.D., PMP

Assistant Professor, Learning Technologies Division

College of Education and Human Development

George Mason University4400 University Drive MSN 5D6

Fairfax, VA 22030

Phone: 703-993-9704

Fax: 703-993-2722

Web: http://it.gse.gmu.edu

E-Mail: swilliae@gmu.edu

Tom poses a very interesting and valid question re: the cost of developing textual-based online courses vs. the costs of a strongly video-based course, in the Coursera model.

One data point that I don't know has been captured is the average amount of man hours an instructor engages in when developing "lecture" content for online that is essentially it's own primer, reader, or textbook. Obviously, scale determines the amount of human effort; our swag has always been about 100 hours of instructor effort to develop 14 weeks' worth of associated content via writing.

I have colleagues in our university system who have access to a fully equipped and staffed TV studio, so their ability to produce Coursera-like content would far outstrip my campus. However...and here's the big "but"...I would wager that very few faculty have the ability to deliver 100% perfect lectures in a single take. I would love to know the average amount (in hours) of raw footage vs. edited product being cranked out in Coursera land. Perhaps this explains the initial delays between anticipated and actual course launch dates?

Greg

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