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It sounds to me, on face appearances, that you think there is equivalency between the live and recorded version of the same lecture.

Speaking for myself, just the mention of the words "recorded lecture" make my eyes begin to close and my neck bend towards my desk - unless the presenter is exceptionally charismatic and has the ability to craft something that will hold my attention. This is the exception rather than the rule.

Consider offering something that is more of an incremental step for faculty that will enhance existing skills and build new foundation skills. For example, nearly every instructor I have had (recently) has dropped a PowerPoint file on us at one time or another. PPT is generally a poor medium for communication without a companion form of communication to elaborate on or contextualize the slide information. Our Ed Tech department at Granite State College has been considering promoting the use of myBrainShark.com as a way for faculty to record slide-by-slide audio accompaniment and then embed the slideshow in the LMS like a YouTube video. Slideshare.net has a similar capability, but I found that the interface and capabilities within myBrainShark was much better.

You get at least three benefits out of this relatively small effort: 1) students get a more rich experience compared to a bare PPT file; 2) faculty learn a new web-based skill utilizing their own computer microphone (no lab needed); 3) the embed process skill is highly transferable to other media that utilize the embed process (YouTube, VoiceThread, Timeglider, etc.).

- Steve Covello

Rich Media Specialist
Granite State College
Concord, NH


Comments



Susan and Laurie - this is great.  I think the combined suggestions on user response systems and implementation (because it's implementation more than tech) really build on each other.  I realize now that going for clickers - physical ones or even investing in a particular model/company - is not the best way to go.  Certainly not a good use of funds.  

I will take these suggestions and move forward.  

thank you,
allan chen


Chief Information Officer
Menlo College
1000 El Camino Real
Atherton, CA 94027
v: 650-543-3889


Just a quick comment. 

Great classroom PowerPoints are (or should be if they are any good) next to worthless online. If not, what is the instructor adding when s/he is in the classroom teaching? Slideshare is an example of this.

Simply dumping classroom ppts onto a VLE is worthless. If an instructor believes his/her PowerPoint available online replaces the lecture then why did they turn up to speak in the first place?

Sent from my iPad

On 27 Feb 2013, at 20:59, "Allan Chen" <achen@MENLO.EDU> wrote:



Hi Clive,
I would definitely recommend a low-tech/low-cost solution like the one you mentioned with existing DSL cameras and equipment. What I see often is people spending a lot of money on technology that doesn't get used (just because you have it does not mean it will be used). Find a nice base of faculty who will pilot that low-tech/low-cost option, and then based on their feedback decide if more expensive equipment is necessary. You might even find a lot of the faculty like the low-tech option better.

If you proceed with the semi-flipped classroom, I would recommend either iTunes U or YouTube (as unlisted videos) for placing your recorded lectures online and then linking to them from the LMS. I would also strongly encourage faculty to chunk the information and keep the videos short (5-10 minutes). If they're interested in audio only, SoundCloud and Audioboo are decent sites for hosting audio (SoundCloud has a 2 hour time limit for their free version), as is iTunes U of course. 

Before investing in clickers, I would suggest Poll Everywhere. They've come a long way over the years with a variety of ways to connect and they integrate into PowerPoint. You could also try less real-time solutions like Google Forms to survey students and then get graphs of the results. If you decide you want a clicker system, we've been very happy with TurningPoint. We have 30 of the physical clickers, but they rarely get used since you can use an iDevice app or website to submit results.

Another thing you might want to encourage faculty to do is bring in outside experts through synchronous meeting tools (Skype, Google Hangouts, LiveMinutes, other web conferencing solutions your college might have, etc.). Most faculty know someone else in the field they could ask to speak to the class for a portion of the class time and then be available for Q&A. This should also be a cost-free initiative.

If you want to encourage more group projects for students, Google Drive and Wiggio are great options.

Feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

Kayleen

Kayleen Grage
Academic Technology Project Coordinator
Teaching and Learning with Technology Center
Buena Vista University
gragek@bvu.edu
1.712.749.1889
1.800.803.6583

Allen,

I echo my colleagues' wise comments on the problems with lecture capture.  Aside from generally being boring, its is just simply bad pedagogy, IMHO.

As Director of Emerging & Instructional Technology, my job is to work with folks on things that are not "standard" or "supported centrally".  So I find myself, pretty much always, in the position of trying to come up with things that will interest folks.  Its very hard to find and feature something when the audience doesn't know they want it.

In other words, these type of projects need to be faculty driven.

What I would suggest is that you identify a small handful of the thought leaders and bring them in, all together, and ask them what types of projects they'd like to see.  Start broad and work down.  Don't ask them what specific project they'd like, start with what they think is cool and interesting, get them talking, take great notes, and then work from that.

best,
aj



Alternatively, ask students. They are often better judges of their own learning needs than we give them credit for – and in our experience, student requests of faculty are much more motivating and change-causing than administrative requests/demands.

 

Emily

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of AJ
Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2013 11:10 AM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] if you could pilot one easy-entry inst tech...

 

Allen,

 

I echo my colleagues' wise comments on the problems with lecture capture.  Aside from generally being boring, its is just simply bad pedagogy, IMHO.

 

As Director of Emerging & Instructional Technology, my job is to work with folks on things that are not "standard" or "supported centrally".  So I find myself, pretty much always, in the position of trying to come up with things that will interest folks.  Its very hard to find and feature something when the audience doesn't know they want it.

 

In other words, these type of projects need to be faculty driven.

 

What I would suggest is that you identify a small handful of the thought leaders and bring them in, all together, and ask them what types of projects they'd like to see.  Start broad and work down.  Don't ask them what specific project they'd like, start with what they think is cool and interesting, get them talking, take great notes, and then work from that.

 

best,

aj

 

 

There are other dangers of lecture capture. (Apologies but this story broke today) http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/professor-watches-porn-film-acci... ________________________________ From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv on behalf of AJ Sent: Thu 28/02/2013 16:09 To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] if you could pilot one easy-entry inst tech... Allen, I echo my colleagues' wise comments on the problems with lecture capture. Aside from generally being boring, its is just simply bad pedagogy, IMHO. As Director of Emerging & Instructional Technology, my job is to work with folks on things that are not "standard" or "supported centrally". So I find myself, pretty much always, in the position of trying to come up with things that will interest folks. Its very hard to find and feature something when the audience doesn't know they want it. In other words, these type of projects need to be faculty driven. What I would suggest is that you identify a small handful of the thought leaders and bring them in, all together, and ask them what types of projects they'd like to see. Start broad and work down. Don't ask them what specific project they'd like, start with what they think is cool and interesting, get them talking, take great notes, and then work from that. best, aj
In that case...

A few years ago, when there was a bit of money to spare at the end of the year, I assembled a "portable podcasting unit".  I bought two mics, with small stands and n M-Audio Mobile PreUSB unit.  The mics go into the M-Audio, which goes into any computer, and BAM, you've got the ability to record an "interview" or presentation.  Works great with GarageBand on the Mac.  I've never tried it with Audacity on a PC but it should work.

Along these same lines, how about getting a few Pamela For Skype licenses, so faculty can "interview" folks over skype and share with the class via a recording posted to the LMS.




I tried self-recording while I was in graduate studies at a Div I private university that shall not be named (from '09-'11). One professor discovered that the small device I showed him when I asked permission was not an audio recorder, but a video recorder (FlipCam) and sent me a LONG email that in no uncertain terms said that if I proceeded to record another class, I would be written up for disciplinary action and possible termination from the program. This professor said that it was a violation of school copyright policy and placed the instructor at risk as well (I didn't get into details about what the nature was about this risk). Part of the problem was that I uploaded the videos to a password protected website of my own making so that only students from this class could log in and view the videos if they missed the class or if they wanted to review the lecture again. Meanwhile, a different professor in the same program actively encouraged me to record the lectures and class proceedings and share them -- both during the same term! I explained to this instructor that I was disciplined for doing this and that I would not be able to record the lectures/classes anymore and share them. It was quite a mixed message, to say the least. I guess it all depends on where you dwell. - Steve On 3/3/13 8:43 AM, "Emily Springfield" wrote: >Hear, hear. Lecture recording may not be stellar instruction, but it >is useful insofar as it goes. And it's becoming a commodity technology >- as commonplace as email and LMS. Once it's set up, it should be >pretty trouble-free. No post production is needed - just raw >audio/video and a copy of the ppt slides. > >That being said, some of our students have set up a shadow recording >system this year, because iTunesU has been pretty flaky lately. Is the >future of lecture capture DIY? > >-------- >Emily Springfield >University of Michigan > >
Our students get written permission of instructors before recording, at the beginning of each semester, to void this confusion. Emily -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Covello, Steve Sent: Monday, March 04, 2013 8:59 AM To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] if you could pilot one easy-entry inst tech... I tried self-recording while I was in graduate studies at a Div I private university that shall not be named (from '09-'11). One professor discovered that the small device I showed him when I asked permission was not an audio recorder, but a video recorder (FlipCam) and sent me a LONG email that in no uncertain terms said that if I proceeded to record another class, I would be written up for disciplinary action and possible termination from the program. This professor said that it was a violation of school copyright policy and placed the instructor at risk as well (I didn't get into details about what the nature was about this risk). Part of the problem was that I uploaded the videos to a password protected website of my own making so that only students from this class could log in and view the videos if they missed the class or if they wanted to review the lecture again. Meanwhile, a different professor in the same program actively encouraged me to record the lectures and class proceedings and share them -- both during the same term! I explained to this instructor that I was disciplined for doing this and that I would not be able to record the lectures/classes anymore and share them. It was quite a mixed message, to say the least. I guess it all depends on where you dwell. - Steve On 3/3/13 8:43 AM, "Emily Springfield" wrote: >Hear, hear. Lecture recording may not be stellar instruction, but it is >useful insofar as it goes. And it's becoming a commodity technology >- as commonplace as email and LMS. Once it's set up, it should be >pretty trouble-free. No post production is needed - just raw >audio/video and a copy of the ppt slides. > >That being said, some of our students have set up a shadow recording >system this year, because iTunesU has been pretty flaky lately. Is the >future of lecture capture DIY? > >-------- >Emily Springfield >University of Michigan > >
Streaming video off of a standard webserver is not optimal for bandwidth load. If enough people watch the videos at once, the whole Moodle system will slow down to a crawl. You are better integrating a dedicated media streaming server separate from Moodle. - Steve Granite State College ________________________________________

I disagree that lectures should only be for your class. I think there is plenty of added value to putting your original lectures put out there. Just look at stanford or mit.
On our campus we had an instructor put his content for public consumption on iTunes and he has had others from universities thank him for his outstanding content and have been using it in their classes as additional material for their class.
We have also tried out media core open source and have had good luck with it until lately where the performance has been lack luster and we can't seem to upload from anything but safari. Mediacore does provide a free account for instructors though which is excellent.

Paul Hickey

sent from a mobile device

On Mar 4, 2013 7:47 PM, "Covello, Steve" <Steve.Covello@granite.edu> wrote:
Streaming video off of a standard webserver is not optimal for bandwidth load. If enough people watch the videos at once, the whole Moodle system will slow down to a crawl.

You are better integrating a dedicated media streaming server separate from Moodle.

- Steve

Granite State College
________________________________________
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