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Message from kurt.sussman@keystone.edu

Hi Folks-

We would like some input from any institutions using the hosted Moodlerooms Joule platform.

We are just finishing our first semester using the hosted Joule platform.

We are still tweaking our admin strategies, and would like some input.

We want instructors to be able to have access to courses one year after they have taught them, so that when the new shell is created, they can copy their old content into the new shell.

We thought about using the course template to do this, however I don’t think it’s much use since often times instructors don’t teach the same section of a course, which would make their content copy into someone else’s course.

So, we want to give access, yet keep the server from bloating.

Here’s our current strategy:

Courses are created the minute they hit the SIS via conduit.

Instructors are enrolled immediately, students enrolled 1 week prior to the start of class (so that instructors can build their course content without students seeing and interacting).

Students are unenrolled 1 month after the end of term (in order to allow for completion of incompletes).

Instructors are unenrolled 1.5 YEARS after the end of term, so that they have access when the next year’s shell is created.

After 1.5 years (3 full semesters), old courses are archived and removed from the server.

 

We don’t know if this iteration of our strategy is best, and it is impossible to foresee all of the ramifications.

Any thoughts or strategies to suggest?

Thanks-

 

 

Kurt Sussman

Director of Educational Technology

Keystone College

(570)945-8205

Kurt.sussman@keystone.edu

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Sure - just a few cursory comments/questions...
  • Is there a particular reason you don't want your instructors to have access to the Moodle courses they have taught all the way up until they are archived? By default (in Moodle), instructors (and I'm talking about people with the standard "instructor" role) have the ability to import content from any course they have previous taught in that system into any other course they have access to. Simply allowing instructors to have permanent access to their own courses would solve your import problem.
  • Is there a particular reason you don't want your students to have access to the Moodle courses they have taken, as long as instructors have chosen to continue to make those courses available to them? The ability to go back and retrieve forgotten data for use in a portfolio or just to refresh one's memory could be important. If you un-enroll students from a Moodle course, it will also hide all of their data from whomever might want to come back and look at those courses later on, whether an instructor or someone else who might need to go back and figure something out, and then the student would have to be re-enrolled (likely manually) in order to take a look. Seems like double work...
  • Enrolling students into your courses only one week prior to the class start date seems a bit late, at least according to our sensibilities. Our standard (in our adult schools, at least), is that instructors need to have the courses open and syllabi posted (at least) two weeks prior to the start date for the course. The standard instructor role allows instructors to control when their courses become available to students, and so if you simply enroll the students in Moodle courses as soon as they're actually enrolled in the actual course, the instructor can work happily away at the course without making it available to those students until he or she is ready to do so. Or is there something I'm not understanding about how you're set up that makes that impossible?
I guess those are just a few thoughts. I'd be happy to chat with you off-list if you have additional questions about how we manage our environment. We specifically chose not to go with Joule (Moodlerooms) for a number of reasons, and use a combination of self-hosting and Remote-Learner hosting to give us the flexibility we require. Like I said, I'd be happy to go over how we're set up if you're interested...

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467




Message from kurt.sussman@keystone.edu

Thanks Matt-

Answering, in order:

First, we do have instructors enrolled until archive time.

Second, as far as keeping students enrolled, we try to keep their course enrollments to a minimum so that they aren’t bogged down on their dashboard, and confused as to which is their current course. This was problematic in Blackboard, where students and faculty had a ton of classes cluttering up their “my institution” page.

Lastly, we use conduit to communicate between our SIS and MR, and this along with our template sets the availability. That said, this makes it impossible for faculty to set their course availability, because with the next conduit run the automated process will just revert this setting back to the default stated in the course template.

Make sense?

Your point about student access for portfolios is a great one, however…I have many instructors who teach adjunct elsewhere, and they say that our enrollment and archive policies are less stringent than other institutions, who tell students that they have a certain amount of time (a month, I think), and then the course will be archived and gone. This seems a little harsh to me, but we try to find the balance between availability and prudent system management.

Thanks a lot for your thoughts-

 

Kurt Sussman

Director of Educational Technology

Keystone College

(570)945-8205

Kurt.sussman@keystone.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Matthew Putz
Sent: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 12:20 PM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Moodlerooms Joule administration

 

Sure - just a few cursory comments/questions...

  • Is there a particular reason you don't want your instructors to have access to the Moodle courses they have taught all the way up until they are archived? By default (in Moodle), instructors (and I'm talking about people with the standard "instructor" role) have the ability to import content from any course they have previous taught in that system into any other course they have access to. Simply allowing instructors to have permanent access to their own courses would solve your import problem.
  • Is there a particular reason you don't want your students to have access to the Moodle courses they have taken, as long as instructors have chosen to continue to make those courses available to them? The ability to go back and retrieve forgotten data for use in a portfolio or just to refresh one's memory could be important. If you un-enroll students from a Moodle course, it will also hide all of their data from whomever might want to come back and look at those courses later on, whether an instructor or someone else who might need to go back and figure something out, and then the student would have to be re-enrolled (likely manually) in order to take a look. Seems like double work...
  • Enrolling students into your courses only one week prior to the class start date seems a bit late, at least according to our sensibilities. Our standard (in our adult schools, at least), is that instructors need to have the courses open and syllabi posted (at least) two weeks prior to the start date for the course. The standard instructor role allows instructors to control when their courses become available to students, and so if you simply enroll the students in Moodle courses as soon as they're actually enrolled in the actual course, the instructor can work happily away at the course without making it available to those students until he or she is ready to do so. Or is there something I'm not understanding about how you're set up that makes that impossible?

I guess those are just a few thoughts. I'd be happy to chat with you off-list if you have additional questions about how we manage our environment. We specifically chose not to go with Joule (Moodlerooms) for a number of reasons, and use a combination of self-hosting and Remote-Learner hosting to give us the flexibility we require. Like I said, I'd be happy to go over how we're set up if you're interested...

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467



You bet - thanks for replying - it sounds to me like your concern about Moodle's front page (an annoyance, to be sure) along with the marriage to Conduit (one of the reasons we didn't go with MoodleRooms) are driving some pretty important decisions. One of our priorities once we move to Moodle 2 is to fix that crazy front page - seems to me that OU of the UK has worked on a solution to that...

Not sure why I was thinking you were unenrolling instructors earlier - MUST PURCHASE BETTER GLASSES

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467




Hey Matt,
 
We are beta-testing Moodle via MoodeRooms and are having communication issues with them (to say the least); so do did you go with to host?
 
Thanks!
 
March Hajre-Chapman M.A.Ed., MLS
Educational Technology Specialist and Online Coordinator
Academic Affairs  
California Institute of Integral Studies
1453 Mission Street San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 575-6111
 
 
Once you can accept the universe as matter expanding into nothing that is something, wearing stripes with plaid comes easy.
- Albert Einstein
 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Matthew Putz
Sent: Thursday, December 08, 2011 9:53 AM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Moodlerooms Joule administration

You bet - thanks for replying - it sounds to me like your concern about Moodle's front page (an annoyance, to be sure) along with the marriage to Conduit (one of the reasons we didn't go with MoodleRooms) are driving some pretty important decisions. One of our priorities once we move to Moodle 2 is to fix that crazy front page - seems to me that OU of the UK has worked on a solution to that...

Not sure why I was thinking you were unenrolling instructors earlier - MUST PURCHASE BETTER GLASSES

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467




We are hosted through Remote-Learner. It's not been a perfect ride, but the services they offer fit us well as an institution. I'd be happy to discuss it more off-list if you're interested...

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467




Message from filipiak@mac.com

Kurt, Looking at the from the student's perspective: If the students are unenrolled after one month, do they still have some sort of access? Depending on what students have done in the system, their work within may be the only place where these efforts are documented. I am specifically thinking of any interactions between students (chats, collaborative writing and editing, etc.), and between students and faculty. For students who may come to need access to these chats and collaborations for future work - a thesis or dissertation, for example - no longer having access to *their* work, could be an impediment to future scholarly activities. While the institution may own the installation of the software, the students own the work within. I would hope there is a way for students to always have access to that work. Ideas sparked in one course, build into ideas, themes, projects, and papers in other courses. I understand your need to keep things simple. I would hope there would be a way to minimize the visual clutter, without removing access to what they have done in the past. Just my $0.02, Brian Filipiak (Formerly with) Eastern Michigan University
Is it possible to think of chats and collaborative work as parallel to discussions and group work in a F2F course? Those are transitory and nobody feels the need to maintain a record of that work. It is the student's responsibility to save anything they think is significant from a F2F course. Couldn't we have the same set of expectations online?

In traditional courses the only responsibility of the school for saving materials is connected with accreditation reviews. For the students they maintain a transcript of courses completed but nothing of content from the courses themselves. A statement to that effect could be included in the course syllabus.

Keeping everything indefinitely seems to me to constrict the ability of students to play with ideas. They need to be free to make propositional statements and then reject or revise them as the discussions continue. That is harder to do if everything I say becomes a part of a permanent record.

Am I missing something in holding this view?

Alan Selig



In answer to your question, I would say that there may be a couple of things missing. First, I do not think that I would be comfortable making this statement: "We will limit our expectations in such a way that we will not attempt to do things in online environments that we do not attempt to do in F2F environments." You might not be saying that exactly, but your first paragraph hints at it. I completely agree with the statement, "It is the student's responsibility to save anything they think is significant from a F2F course," but I don't think these two ideas are necessarily opposed to one another. The fact that it is the student's responsibility to save things doesn't mean that it couldn't be useful to that student if the institution also kept that data around somehow.

Second, it's not been my experience (and I haven't seen research that demonstrates) that students end up feeling more inhibited in an environment that is textual, and where their statements are recorded and kept than they would in a F2F classroom where there is no tape recorder running. In fact, there is plenty of research that shows that people are quite a lot less inhibited having textual discussions than they are in face-to-face situations, for reasons other than whether or not their communication is being recorded. Also, I have found in my teaching that students do a better job of playing with ideas productively if they can look at what they thought they thought about something last year, compare it to what they think about it this year, and reflect on why that change occurred. The entire e-portfolio industry (if it can be called that) is based on this notion, and it is difficult if not impossible to do if there isn't some sort of record.

My primary objection (at our institution) to permanently archiving courses or removing students from courses before their course of study is complete is that they lose the opportunity to meaningfully reflect on things they actually said and wrote three years ago when they started that they might not have thought important when they first said and wrote them. So being able to take advantage of hindsight is huge, in my mind.

Now I'll be vulnerable too - what am I missing? I'm sure there's more here...

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467




Matt, I appreciate your comments, and find myself agreeing with most of what you say. I also am not comfortable with the idea that we don't want to attempt things online that we wouldn't do in the F2F setting. That would be to deny any of the advantages this newer context permits and/or encourages. I also agree that students are often better able to assess "valuable learning" at points after the course has concluded.

At the same time, the storage space required to maintain all electronic conversations from all courses for an indefinite period of time, on the chance that that students would one day want to review the file, seems overwhelming. And the staff time required to determine which data sets will be retained seems problematic as well. I feel like the solution lies closer to the end of limited retention (and student responsibility) of data, than the end of comprehensive retention (and institutional responsibility.)

Do you, or anyone, know if there has been research done on how frequently students access these archives? Results from such research might give strong force in one direction or the other.


I definitely hear what you're saying about storage, and I don't have numbers in front me that would give you a satisfactory answer to your final question below. But I do think it might be an interesting study to compare the cost of cloud disk space (getting very cheap) with the cost of managing an archival system (and all of the people-processes that can entail, including retrieval when needed). I know that we at Bethel are moving toward thinking less about archiving our Moodle courses and more about just expanding our disk space. If you could even get six years of courses to fit comfortably in your current environment (or an easily achievable environment), then archival after that wouldn't be as big a deal, as you'd have very few students who were still needing access to courses older than that. If you could get it to 10 years, then accreditation processes could be positively impacted. Might be worth looking at...

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467




Matt,

Six years makes sense. That would allow for the completion of a 4-5 year program of study, with an extra window of 1-2 years for the earliest stuff. And 10 years would allow for a Bachelor/Master process with access all the way back. How worried about security and confidentiality do you think institutions would be if the approach were one of cloud storage? That's one question I have. The other is -- How much space does a current course at Bethel require for archival storage? I would assume that course archives will generally grow in space required through the years. But even a current total multiplied by the number of courses you offer per year and then by 6 or 10 years, would give an initial idea of the server or cloud space required.

Matt & Alan --

I wonder if you're trying to force the wrong application to do what you want?

From the outside, it seems like you're asking a course management system to accomplish a task better suited to an e-portfolio system.  Whatever (student) work is tied strictly to a course (or class) is by definition related strictly to that course that semester.  It would be appropriate to ask students to move any work that they wanted to preserve beyond the end of term into their individual portfolios.  A really clever LMS-eportfolio interface would allow for very easy movement between the two--a "Save in Portfolio?" feature, just like the "Save as" option.

Is this a possibility?

Glenn Everett, PhD
Pembroke, MA
gseverett1@gmail.com
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/geverett
Blog:  http://gseverett1.wordpress.com/

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Glenn,  I think e-portfolios provide a very important collection center for students as they move through a course of study. It can also give a good indication of progress and growth if the student is willing to be vulnerable and show themselves at a novice or partial-mastery stage. The one difficulty of an e-portfolio is that it doesn't permit the student to regain access to materials after the individual course is concluded. They have to decide at or near the end of the course what will be important to put in the portfolio. So a piece of the dilemma still exists.

Alan

Message from filipiak@mac.com

Alan, Matt, & Glenn, Thanks for the engaging ideas. I was going to ask questions about how much disk space is consumed by a typical online course, and about the comparative costs between leaving a course available vs. managing/archiving/restoring those courses as the need arises. But I suspect those questions may be moot for many schools. In the case of hosted products, either commercial or open-source, there likely is a real cost to the institution, to keep courses available past a certain time. My point at the beginning was just that this is an often unrecognized opportunity. Early in their "careers", students won't recognize all the things that may be important to them in the future. We have an opportunity to give more access to those things that constructed their (future) selves than at any other time. Is there a compelling reason for not doing that? On the institutional side, as Matt has pointed out, there may be good accreditation reasons for doing so. Short of keeping all the work, Glenn's suggestion of presenting students with the option of easily archiving/downloading/saving *all* of the work from within an online course would be one option. Not only the documents they turned in within the course, but also the threaded discussions with their peers and faculty, and the original teaching materials in the course shell to begin with. I'm not sure any of the current systems do that. It is often the ideas presented by faculty, and the enclosed readings, links to other sites, and other attached materials, that would also be lost to the student if access is cut off. Brian
I find this discussion particularly interesting because we are at the nub of an important question:  how much do we rely on searchable computer storage to keep track of ideas, and how much do we require some engagement with the information (or data?) before we archive it somehow.  I know from my own experience that if lots of storage is easily available, I am very tempted to simply dump information into it, without really looking too closely at it first.  Retrieving needed information later is a challenge, because I have only a hazy memory of what I put there.

So I wasn't really suggesting that ALL course activity be easily dumped into an archive, but rather, SELECTED materials.  Of course, that selection might be very broad.  As far as students retaining the instructors' materials: aren't we talking about some combination of handouts and notes (to use terms from the F2F world)?  It seems to me to be reconceiving, and greatly expanding, the role of the LMS to say that we are going to make all those materials permanently available, automatically.  It's making the LMS a publishing tool rather than a course management tool.

But everything depends on storage costs, and I am assuming that LMS server space is more expensive than other options.  If in fact the cost of archiving materials on the LMS server were essentially free and infinitely expandable, then much of what I am suggesting would be moot, and the need to move materials that students want to keep onto local or personal storage would be lessened.

Alan: to me the point of putting something into a portfolio is that it be easily retrievable. If they can't gain access to it, then the portfolio isn't working properly.  Of course, not everything in the portfolio needs to be publicly accessible.  So I'm comfortable forcing students to make a choice about what to save--that is, what to preserve from the LMS server.

Glenn

Glenn Everett, PhD
Pembroke, MA
gseverett1@gmail.com
617-688-2102
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/geverett
Blog:  http://gseverett1.wordpress.com/
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from orwinr@uw.edu

Isn’t the purpose of the ePortfolio to make students think about what artifacts from a course are examples of their best work?

 

I do know of a university in Australia that provides an ePortfolio system for all students, faculty, staff and alumni that they can keep, as far as I know, indefinitely. The goal was to keep the connection between the university and alumni for as long as possible. I heard this second hand, but would be willing to find out details if anybody is interested.

 

Randy

 

*******************************************

Randy Orwin

Online Learning Administrator

University of Washington Information School

http://ischool.uw.edu

Box 352840
Mary Gates Hall, Ste 370
Seattle, WA 98195-2840

Phone: 206.616.0879 | orwinr@uw.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Alan Selig
Sent: Saturday, December 10, 2011 8:50 AM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Moodlerooms Joule administration

 

Glenn,  I think e-portfolios provide a very important collection center for students as they move through a course of study. It can also give a good indication of progress and growth if the student is willing to be vulnerable and show themselves at a novice or partial-mastery stage. The one difficulty of an e-portfolio is that it doesn't permit the student to regain access to materials after the individual course is concluded. They have to decide at or near the end of the course what will be important to put in the portfolio. So a piece of the dilemma still exists.

Alan

Message from kurt.sussman@keystone.edu

Thanks to all of you.. Alan, Glenn, Matthew, Brian…

Great insights…I knew I could trust this group for that.

Here are some considerations to add to the soup:

First, we are using a hosted solution with MR, and you’re right, storage is not cheap. That, coupled with the fact that our Blackboard server (which we hosted) had everything from the last decade and was hopelessly bloated, pushed us to re-visit our strategies.

Second, I agree that students should have access to materials that they have produced, but I think a large onus of responsibility is on them; we are, after all, trying to prepare them for the “real” world, which rarely caters to one’s lack of preparedness.

Third, I’m sure that you are all aware, that in Joule even when a student is removed from a course, and the course is archived, it can be restored at any time and if the student is re-enrolled, all of their data comes back, so retrieval is possible…I also wonder how often this would actually happen, but for assessment and accreditation purposes, it can be done.

 

Keep it coming…I want to see this from all of the angles that I can, now that we are still embryonic…

 

Kurt Sussman

Director of Educational Technology

Keystone College

(570)945-8205

Kurt.sussman@keystone.edu

 

Message from kurt.sussman@keystone.edu

Actually, it's both...our solution is for X number of users, and the plan included 150 GB of storage (which seemed Spartan, hence my concern for conservation). Extra space costs extra. However, it ended up being comparable to Blackboard's fees, and we hosted BB. So we felt, for a little more, we got a hosted solution and a better product for about the same money. Kurt ________________________________________ From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Matthew Putz [m-putz@BETHEL.EDU] Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 1:37 PM To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Moodlerooms Joule administration I agree - good conversation. I wasn't aware that MR was charging for storage? My understanding was that they were charging per-user, which was one of the many reasons we decided not to go with them. We have a terabyte of space with R-L, and we pay about 25% of what it would have cost us to host with MR. And our new streaming media solution will further stretch that space, since so much of the disk that courses take up is tied up in large media files. We are curious to see if getting the majority of large media files (images and videos) out of Moodle's filespace will reduce our disk needs for Moodle to the point that we don't have to worry about archiving for quite a while... Matt --------------------------------------------- Matthew Putz, Ed.D. Director of Teaching and Learning Technology Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu) (651) 638-6467
Message from kurt.sussman@keystone.edu

Great insights, Robert…I appreciate your input.

We, too, have negotiated storage beyond the initial limit, but as it’s still finite, we still err on the side of caution.

We initially were keeping courses active for one month after the end of term; that’s how much time students and faculty have to resolve incompletes.

We moved to have instructors remain enrolled in courses for 1.5 years so that they would still be enrolled in the “old” course when the new shell is created, giving them the ability to copy content from their old shell to new.

I think this is a reasonable strategy, however I am not sure how to handle courses that run “sporadically.” We have some courses that only come around every 2 years or so.

Do you have any insights as to how to address this?

 

Kurt Sussman

Director of Educational Technology

Keystone College

(570)945-8205

Kurt.sussman@keystone.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Squires, Robert
Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 7:53 PM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Moodlerooms Joule administration

 

Hi all,

 

Interesting discussion. The University of Montana- Missoula, MT-Tech, UM-Helena, UM-Western and the Montana Digital Academy are all hosted with Moodlerooms. We arranged for increasing storage and users over a three-year period in line with the roll-out and expansion of the LMS: Year 1: 660GB / 11,000 users, Year 2: 1080 GB 18000 users, Year 3: 1380 GB/2300 users. We are about halfway through this contract with Moodlerooms and in our experience MRooms do not consider users as part of payment other than to initially determine the amount of storage required.

 

In terms of our process for archiving, not much has changed since Blackboard days:  Instructors receive notification that courses will be made inactive during the final week of the semester.  At this time, there is an option to request that courses remain active by making selection at a webpage.  Without action, courses will remain active in the LMS for up to two weeks after the end of the semester. If an instructor requests that a course remains active, it will remain so until the end of the spring semester of the following year, when the courses are archived locally. Instructors are notified when the course is scheduled to be archived. Instructors can request courses remain active at this point.  The maximum time that courses can remain active in the system is three years after the semester of delivery. Note: The archive/removal process only affects the courses that are semester specific, for example, Spring2010, Summer2010.

 

We have kept archived courses on local storage indefinitely in the past, but we revisited this recently, so your comments here are very interesting. At present, we are leaning to the cautious side and keeping archives for as long as needed. We haven’t quite determined the extent of that need, but 5 years has been identified as a reasonable period and easily exceeds FERPA requirements. It’s comes down to customer service to an extent. What would we like to be able to do and what is a reasonable expense for this.

 

Thanks,

 

Robert

 

Robert Squires

Director of Instructional Design and Technical Support

UMOnline

School of Extended & Lifelong Learning

The University of Montana, Missoula 59812

O: 406.243.6056

M: 406.240.3837

 

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Matthew Putz
Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 3:47 PM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Moodlerooms Joule administration

 

I wouldn't disagree with any of that. Every institution needs to match these things up to personality, mission, internal resources, etc. 150GB is REALLY tiny - I can understand your caution...

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467

 

Very interesting & informative thread!

 

We keep all our utilized Moodle courses & their assigned instructor for two years to accommodate those sporadic offerings.  As a smaller and self-hosted institution, it may be easier for us to do that.  Students, on the other hand are un-enrolled from the courses after 150 days.  

I must say also that the faculty & students do not like to have their Moodle home pages cluttered up with past courses.  The 150 days takes care of that on the student side & I have devised a course header scheme that shifts past courses away from the top of the list for faculty.

 

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Ron Balko

Learning Technologies Coord.

Concordia College

Moorhead, MN 56560

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Kurt M. Sussman
Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 9:20 AM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Moodlerooms Joule administration

 

Great insights, Robert…I appreciate your input.

We, too, have negotiated storage beyond the initial limit, but as it’s still finite, we still err on the side of caution.

We initially were keeping courses active for one month after the end of term; that’s how much time students and faculty have to resolve incompletes.

We moved to have instructors remain enrolled in courses for 1.5 years so that they would still be enrolled in the “old” course when the new shell is created, giving them the ability to copy content from their old shell to new.

I think this is a reasonable strategy, however I am not sure how to handle courses that run “sporadically.” We have some courses that only come around every 2 years or so.

Do you have any insights as to how to address this?

 

Kurt Sussman

Director of Educational Technology

Keystone College

(570)945-8205

Kurt.sussman@keystone.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Squires, Robert
Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 7:53 PM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Moodlerooms Joule administration

 

Hi all,

 

Interesting discussion. The University of Montana- Missoula, MT-Tech, UM-Helena, UM-Western and the Montana Digital Academy are all hosted with Moodlerooms. We arranged for increasing storage and users over a three-year period in line with the roll-out and expansion of the LMS: Year 1: 660GB / 11,000 users, Year 2: 1080 GB 18000 users, Year 3: 1380 GB/2300 users. We are about halfway through this contract with Moodlerooms and in our experience MRooms do not consider users as part of payment other than to initially determine the amount of storage required.

 

In terms of our process for archiving, not much has changed since Blackboard days:  Instructors receive notification that courses will be made inactive during the final week of the semester.  At this time, there is an option to request that courses remain active by making selection at a webpage.  Without action, courses will remain active in the LMS for up to two weeks after the end of the semester. If an instructor requests that a course remains active, it will remain so until the end of the spring semester of the following year, when the courses are archived locally. Instructors are notified when the course is scheduled to be archived. Instructors can request courses remain active at this point.  The maximum time that courses can remain active in the system is three years after the semester of delivery. Note: The archive/removal process only affects the courses that are semester specific, for example, Spring2010, Summer2010.

 

We have kept archived courses on local storage indefinitely in the past, but we revisited this recently, so your comments here are very interesting. At present, we are leaning to the cautious side and keeping archives for as long as needed. We haven’t quite determined the extent of that need, but 5 years has been identified as a reasonable period and easily exceeds FERPA requirements. It’s comes down to customer service to an extent. What would we like to be able to do and what is a reasonable expense for this.

 

Thanks,

 

Robert

 

Robert Squires

Director of Instructional Design and Technical Support

UMOnline

School of Extended & Lifelong Learning

The University of Montana, Missoula 59812

O: 406.243.6056

M: 406.240.3837

 

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Matthew Putz
Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 3:47 PM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Moodlerooms Joule administration

 

I wouldn't disagree with any of that. Every institution needs to match these things up to personality, mission, internal resources, etc. 150GB is REALLY tiny - I can understand your caution...

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467

 

A Moodle-related question:
 
If your institution was to hire someone as a Moodle administrator, someone who potentially built, maintained, and was responsible for course population (or preferably the in-house equivalent), writes and manages the software/coding aspect of the course site(s), templates, etc. and handled upgrades, IT problems, etc, what specific technical background and education would you require for this position? Who would they report to? Salary range?
If you happen to have a job description for this kind of position, feel free to send it to me off-list too. 
 
Many thanks.
 
Thanks!
 
March Hajre-Chapman M.A.Ed., MLS
Educational Technology Specialist and Online Coordinator
Academic Affairs  
California Institute of Integral Studies
1453 Mission Street San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 575-6111
 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Kurt M. Sussman
Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 7:20 AM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Moodlerooms Joule administration

Great insights, Robert…I appreciate your input.

We, too, have negotiated storage beyond the initial limit, but as it’s still finite, we still err on the side of caution.

We initially were keeping courses active for one month after the end of term; that’s how much time students and faculty have to resolve incompletes.

We moved to have instructors remain enrolled in courses for 1.5 years so that they would still be enrolled in the “old” course when the new shell is created, giving them the ability to copy content from their old shell to new.

I think this is a reasonable strategy, however I am not sure how to handle courses that run “sporadically.” We have some courses that only come around every 2 years or so.

Do you have any insights as to how to address this?

 

Kurt Sussman

Director of Educational Technology

Keystone College

(570)945-8205

Kurt.sussman@keystone.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Squires, Robert
Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 7:53 PM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Moodlerooms Joule administration

 

Hi all,

 

Interesting discussion. The University of Montana- Missoula, MT-Tech, UM-Helena, UM-Western and the Montana Digital Academy are all hosted with Moodlerooms. We arranged for increasing storage and users over a three-year period in line with the roll-out and expansion of the LMS: Year 1: 660GB / 11,000 users, Year 2: 1080 GB 18000 users, Year 3: 1380 GB/2300 users. We are about halfway through this contract with Moodlerooms and in our experience MRooms do not consider users as part of payment other than to initially determine the amount of storage required.

 

In terms of our process for archiving, not much has changed since Blackboard days:  Instructors receive notification that courses will be made inactive during the final week of the semester.  At this time, there is an option to request that courses remain active by making selection at a webpage.  Without action, courses will remain active in the LMS for up to two weeks after the end of the semester. If an instructor requests that a course remains active, it will remain so until the end of the spring semester of the following year, when the courses are archived locally. Instructors are notified when the course is scheduled to be archived. Instructors can request courses remain active at this point.  The maximum time that courses can remain active in the system is three years after the semester of delivery. Note: The archive/removal process only affects the courses that are semester specific, for example, Spring2010, Summer2010.

 

We have kept archived courses on local storage indefinitely in the past, but we revisited this recently, so your comments here are very interesting. At present, we are leaning to the cautious side and keeping archives for as long as needed. We haven’t quite determined the extent of that need, but 5 years has been identified as a reasonable period and easily exceeds FERPA requirements. It’s comes down to customer service to an extent. What would we like to be able to do and what is a reasonable expense for this.

 

Thanks,

 

Robert

 

Robert Squires

Director of Instructional Design and Technical Support

UMOnline

School of Extended & Lifelong Learning

The University of Montana, Missoula 59812

O: 406.243.6056

M: 406.240.3837

 

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Matthew Putz
Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 3:47 PM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Moodlerooms Joule administration

 

I wouldn't disagree with any of that. Every institution needs to match these things up to personality, mission, internal resources, etc. 150GB is REALLY tiny - I can understand your caution...

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467

 

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