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Message from chutchison@devrymedical.org

At Ross, we are streaming clips and full length videos with Fliqz/Vbrick that is incorporated into eCollege.  All videos are produced internally.

Dr. Charles P. Hutchison
Senior Director of Instructional Technology
DeVry Medical International, Inc.
630 US Highway 1
North Brunswick, NJ 08902-3311
(334) 577-4434 Office
(334) 322-0807 Cell


Comments

At Mitchell College we are using VBrick and also subscribe to Films on Demand, which is becoming very popular with our faculty.  We considered Swank, but it is a bit premature for us to take on that kind of expense.  And we are beginning to explore lecture capture solutions.  Can anyone advise on Echo 360, which recently introduced a media upload feature, and is this something that might represent a viable alternative to the various streaming media solutions that have been mentioned in this discussion?

 

 

Suzanne M. Bartels, MLS

Director of Library and Information Services (LIS)

Mitchell College

437 Pequot Avenue

New London, CT  06320

www.mitchell.edu

Phone:  860.701.5155

Email:   bartels_s@mitchell.edu

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Instructional Technologies Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Hutchison, Charles P.
Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 2:31 PM
To: INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [INSTTECH] Streaming movies in LMS...

 

At Ross, we are streaming clips and full length videos with Fliqz/Vbrick that is incorporated into eCollege.  All videos are produced internally.

Dr. Charles P. Hutchison

Senior Director of Instructional Technology

DeVry Medical International, Inc.

630 US Highway 1

North Brunswick, NJ 08902-3311

(334) 577-4434 Office

(334) 322-0807 Cell

 


At UCF we are using DigitalCampus from Swank, managed by our Library. This ensures copyright adherence and embeds smoothly in our LMS, and also provides the options of full movie or partial clips, as needed. So far it is working very well and gaining in popularity with instructors.

 

~elisabeth

 

Yes, we started this about two years ago, using Moodle and Haivision's VideoFurnace. The program is run through the library and is handled the same way text ereserves are: the faculty request that a video be placed in their course, the library digitizes and adds it. The library requires a copy of the syllabus to verify that it's a core part of the course. We've gone over this in fair detail with our lawyers and we feel on pretty solid ground for a couple of reasons 1. The library vets the syllabus to make sure the video use should come under the TEACH act. Faculty cannot upload their own videos (at least to this system) 2. Videos are available only through Moodle to students enrolled in the course for the duration of the course 3. Videofurnace has a large number of security features designed to prevent unauthorized access: the URLs can't be copied and the video player is a self downloading, self contained program that encrypts the video during transmission and deletes itself when finished. We've had some bumps along the way but it's a wildly popular service among both faculty and students. Eric -- Eric Remy Director, Instructional Technology and Training Gettysburg College eremy@gettysburg.edu From: Scott Robison > Date: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 12:39 PM Subject: Streaming movies in LMS... Is anyone streaming entire movies through their LMS? With online and flipped classrooms, more instructors are asking for clips or entire movies to be accessible online. If you are permitting entire movies, do you require instructors to sign something stating that viewing the entire movie is comparable to what they would do in a F2F course, and is critical to accomplishing course learning outcomes? Scott Robison, Ph.D. Director, Learning Technologies and Online Education 105 Lamson Learning Commons, MSC #47B Plymouth State University Plymouth, NH 03264 603.535.2262 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

At UCF we are using DigitalCampus from Swank, managed by our Library. This ensures copyright adherence and embeds smoothly in our LMS, and also provides the options of full movie or partial clips, as needed. So far it is working very well and gaining in popularity with instructors.

 

~elisabeth

 

Yes, we started this about two years ago, using Moodle and Haivision's VideoFurnace. The program is run through the library and is handled the same way text ereserves are: the faculty request that a video be placed in their course, the library digitizes and adds it. The library requires a copy of the syllabus to verify that it's a core part of the course. We've gone over this in fair detail with our lawyers and we feel on pretty solid ground for a couple of reasons 1. The library vets the syllabus to make sure the video use should come under the TEACH act. Faculty cannot upload their own videos (at least to this system) 2. Videos are available only through Moodle to students enrolled in the course for the duration of the course 3. Videofurnace has a large number of security features designed to prevent unauthorized access: the URLs can't be copied and the video player is a self downloading, self contained program that encrypts the video during transmission and deletes itself when finished. We've had some bumps along the way but it's a wildly popular service among both faculty and students. Eric -- Eric Remy Director, Instructional Technology and Training Gettysburg College eremy@gettysburg.edu From: Scott Robison > Date: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 12:39 PM Subject: Streaming movies in LMS... Is anyone streaming entire movies through their LMS? With online and flipped classrooms, more instructors are asking for clips or entire movies to be accessible online. If you are permitting entire movies, do you require instructors to sign something stating that viewing the entire movie is comparable to what they would do in a F2F course, and is critical to accomplishing course learning outcomes? Scott Robison, Ph.D. Director, Learning Technologies and Online Education 105 Lamson Learning Commons, MSC #47B Plymouth State University Plymouth, NH 03264 603.535.2262 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

At UCF we are using DigitalCampus from Swank, managed by our Library. This ensures copyright adherence and embeds smoothly in our LMS, and also provides the options of full movie or partial clips, as needed. So far it is working very well and gaining in popularity with instructors.

 

~elisabeth

 

Yes, we started this about two years ago, using Moodle and Haivision's VideoFurnace. The program is run through the library and is handled the same way text ereserves are: the faculty request that a video be placed in their course, the library digitizes and adds it. The library requires a copy of the syllabus to verify that it's a core part of the course. We've gone over this in fair detail with our lawyers and we feel on pretty solid ground for a couple of reasons 1. The library vets the syllabus to make sure the video use should come under the TEACH act. Faculty cannot upload their own videos (at least to this system) 2. Videos are available only through Moodle to students enrolled in the course for the duration of the course 3. Videofurnace has a large number of security features designed to prevent unauthorized access: the URLs can't be copied and the video player is a self downloading, self contained program that encrypts the video during transmission and deletes itself when finished. We've had some bumps along the way but it's a wildly popular service among both faculty and students. Eric -- Eric Remy Director, Instructional Technology and Training Gettysburg College eremy@gettysburg.edu From: Scott Robison > Date: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 12:39 PM Subject: Streaming movies in LMS... Is anyone streaming entire movies through their LMS? With online and flipped classrooms, more instructors are asking for clips or entire movies to be accessible online. If you are permitting entire movies, do you require instructors to sign something stating that viewing the entire movie is comparable to what they would do in a F2F course, and is critical to accomplishing course learning outcomes? Scott Robison, Ph.D. Director, Learning Technologies and Online Education 105 Lamson Learning Commons, MSC #47B Plymouth State University Plymouth, NH 03264 603.535.2262 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

At UCF we are using DigitalCampus from Swank, managed by our Library. This ensures copyright adherence and embeds smoothly in our LMS, and also provides the options of full movie or partial clips, as needed. So far it is working very well and gaining in popularity with instructors.

 

~elisabeth

 

Yes, we started this about two years ago, using Moodle and Haivision's VideoFurnace. The program is run through the library and is handled the same way text ereserves are: the faculty request that a video be placed in their course, the library digitizes and adds it. The library requires a copy of the syllabus to verify that it's a core part of the course. We've gone over this in fair detail with our lawyers and we feel on pretty solid ground for a couple of reasons 1. The library vets the syllabus to make sure the video use should come under the TEACH act. Faculty cannot upload their own videos (at least to this system) 2. Videos are available only through Moodle to students enrolled in the course for the duration of the course 3. Videofurnace has a large number of security features designed to prevent unauthorized access: the URLs can't be copied and the video player is a self downloading, self contained program that encrypts the video during transmission and deletes itself when finished. We've had some bumps along the way but it's a wildly popular service among both faculty and students. Eric -- Eric Remy Director, Instructional Technology and Training Gettysburg College eremy@gettysburg.edu From: Scott Robison > Date: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 12:39 PM Subject: Streaming movies in LMS... Is anyone streaming entire movies through their LMS? With online and flipped classrooms, more instructors are asking for clips or entire movies to be accessible online. If you are permitting entire movies, do you require instructors to sign something stating that viewing the entire movie is comparable to what they would do in a F2F course, and is critical to accomplishing course learning outcomes? Scott Robison, Ph.D. Director, Learning Technologies and Online Education 105 Lamson Learning Commons, MSC #47B Plymouth State University Plymouth, NH 03264 603.535.2262 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

At UCF we are using DigitalCampus from Swank, managed by our Library. This ensures copyright adherence and embeds smoothly in our LMS, and also provides the options of full movie or partial clips, as needed. So far it is working very well and gaining in popularity with instructors.

 

~elisabeth

 

Yes, we started this about two years ago, using Moodle and Haivision's VideoFurnace. The program is run through the library and is handled the same way text ereserves are: the faculty request that a video be placed in their course, the library digitizes and adds it. The library requires a copy of the syllabus to verify that it's a core part of the course. We've gone over this in fair detail with our lawyers and we feel on pretty solid ground for a couple of reasons 1. The library vets the syllabus to make sure the video use should come under the TEACH act. Faculty cannot upload their own videos (at least to this system) 2. Videos are available only through Moodle to students enrolled in the course for the duration of the course 3. Videofurnace has a large number of security features designed to prevent unauthorized access: the URLs can't be copied and the video player is a self downloading, self contained program that encrypts the video during transmission and deletes itself when finished. We've had some bumps along the way but it's a wildly popular service among both faculty and students. Eric -- Eric Remy Director, Instructional Technology and Training Gettysburg College eremy@gettysburg.edu From: Scott Robison > Date: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 12:39 PM Subject: Streaming movies in LMS... Is anyone streaming entire movies through their LMS? With online and flipped classrooms, more instructors are asking for clips or entire movies to be accessible online. If you are permitting entire movies, do you require instructors to sign something stating that viewing the entire movie is comparable to what they would do in a F2F course, and is critical to accomplishing course learning outcomes? Scott Robison, Ph.D. Director, Learning Technologies and Online Education 105 Lamson Learning Commons, MSC #47B Plymouth State University Plymouth, NH 03264 603.535.2262 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
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