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Does anyone have resources (PDFs, websites, etc.) that you use or refer faculty to who are interested in teaching a traditional 14/15-week course in a condensed term? Our institution is offering our first winter term in January, which is 3-weeks long. We’re in the process of creating a resource website for faculty and students that explains expectations, possibilities, and best practices, but are hoping not to reinvent the wheel.

Thanks for any help you can provide! 


Matthew Evins, Instructional Design and Technology Specialist
Advanced Learning Technologies
307D Laws Hall

phone:  513.529.5067
matthew.evins@miamioh.edu  
MiamiOH.edu/alt
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Hi Matthew,

You could talk to almost anyone at my institution, as we always teach on a compressed schedule. I'll look into PDFs, websites, but for something we do here all the time, it's interesting I'm not aware of things we've published about it...


Weston

Weston Taylor
--
Instructional Tech @ Colorado College
14 E Cache La Poudre St
Colorado Springs CO 80903
tel. 719-389-6159
fax 719-389-6180

Hi, all,

 

I’m currently getting a Master’s from University of North Texas. Their Learning Technologies program is available as a standard semester or as an accelerated program (I’m doing the accelerated program now – every 8 weeks there are 2 new classes).


You might want to contact someone there.

http://www.lt.unt.edu/

 

Max

 

Tom, Your suggestion of online provision is one I would support but the term 'Learning management' is one I would reject. 'Managing Learning' is not something I recognise as it is unachievable. Facilitating or assisting learning is what we should strive for. Providing outside class activities, collaborative exercises and focused tasks, moderated and facilitated by appropriate faculty can work. Managing learning cannot. Best regards Clive Buckley Sent from my iPad > On 5 Nov 2013, at 21:46, "Tom Worthington" wrote: > >>
You will want to remember that you now have much less time for students to assimilate the information. This is, hopefully, figured into the general design of the longer course and now processing time is much less so needs to be considered in the much shorter course. Though you can adjust "on the fly", having taught some of these, one is generally just trying to keep ahead so the more you have done up-front the safer you will be. Also, consider the impact of outside of class work on the students. If they are trying to read the same amount of material, this is much more difficult. Assignments should be looked at with the shortened timeframe. If you have an assignment that builds on others including reading, you can be up to the final week before you know it. Just some thoughts... Alan =========================================== J. Alan Schrock Director of Information Technology and Library Services European Nazarene College Junkerstrasse 68-70 78266 Büsingen Germany Email: aschrock@eunc.edu Office (U.S. Number): (309) 833-1908 Skype: schrock_office

Matthew,

 

I have taught in a variety of these condensed or "intensive" formats and I think a major component is managing student expectations about the work load.  I used to teach a traditional 15 week marketing course in 5 weeks but the working-full-time students were only allowed to take one course at a time in the program.  I also spent 15 - 20 minutes at the beginning of the first class brainstorming success strategies with the students.  If students do not have realistic expectations to begin with they often fail or drop out which isn't good for them or the program.

 

I don't often see this aspect of these kinds of programs discussed but I believe it is critical.

 

Janet Nichols

Instructional Designer, D'Amore-McKim School of Business

Northeastern University

j.nichols@neu.edu

One part of compressed teaching that I've observed is the importance of timing projects and grade turn-around. If you have fundamentals upon which the rest of the course is based and students don't know if they've got these concepts because they haven't received timely feedback, things will likely not go well. 
Additionally, the number of major assignments may have to be adjusted and to shape the expections of the students, as Janet suggested. I have at least one faculty member who assigns 400 PDF pages of reading per week and some of these pages are "doubled up." While this is not an unreasonable expectation if the student only has one class, the students cannot procrastinate. Also, just as many students only write one draft of a paper, the pressure to do this becomes even greater in a compressed format, as there's little time to let a paper "rest" before re-reading and re-drafting.

I spoke with our Student Success person and she said she'd dig up some resources, which I'll forward to you as soon as I receive them.

Weston

Thanks, everyone for all of your input. This conversation is sparking some great ideas for us to use as we inform our faculty.

Matthew Evins
, Instructional Design and Technology Specialist
Advanced Learning Technologies
307D Laws Hall

phone: 513.529.5067
matthew.evins@miamioh.edu 

To Weston:
Did you come up with the resources you mentioned in your last post in this conversation?

Would you mind sharing?

Thank you in advance!

Cindy Jennings

 

Cindy Jennings

Associate Professor & Director of Learning Technologies

Information Technology and Services

USC Upstate

864-503-5470

Department of Learning Technologies on the Web

 

 

 

Sure, Cindy. The director sent me this:

The person who seems to be doing the most research in this area is Raymond. J. Wlodkowski,  and he co-edited a collection with Carol E. Kasworm called,  Accelerated Learning for Adults: The Promise and Practice of Intensive Educational Formats, published by Wiley in 2003.

As I may have mentioned before, Colorado College is on the block plan where almost every course is intensive or accelerated and taught in three and a half weeks (18 school days), so visiting campus and talking with professors might be a good way to gather information. Teaching here as a visitor is also a great way to get experience with this!

Weston

To Weston:
Did you come up with the resources you mentioned in your last post in this conversation?

Would you mind sharing?

Thank you in advance!

Cindy Jennings

 

Cindy Jennings

Associate Professor & Director of Learning Technologies

Information Technology and Services

USC Upstate

864-503-5470

Department of Learning Technologies on the Web

 

 

 

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