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Hi, all - I'm in the process of developing a doctoral-level course that will give future higher ed administrators a good overview of the complexities of leading an IT organization within an academic institution. I'm curious what books you have found to be formative for you when it comes to your own leadership in this area. Thanks...

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

I would suggest any of the Dilbert books of cartoons.

Bill Vilberg
Instructional Advancement Center
Information Technology
University of Miami, FL
bill.vilberg@miami.edu
786-250-2255

http://vilberg.com - Spreading seeds of education, technology, and more

From: Matthew Putz <m-putz@BETHEL.EDU>
Reply-To: "INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 08:36:27 -0600
To: "INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <INSTTECH@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [INSTTECH] textbook search

Hi, all - I'm in the process of developing a doctoral-level course that will give future higher ed administrators a good overview of the complexities of leading an IT organization within an academic institution. I'm curious what books you have found to be formative for you when it comes to your own leadership in this area. Thanks...

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Hi Matthew,

 

Not that long ago, many members of our CIO list added their recommended leadership books to a wiki we call the “CIO Bookshelf”.

http://www.educause.edu/wiki/The+CIO+Bookshelf

 

There are a handful of books that are marked with “Suggested for a CIO's "first 180 days", you may want to check those ones out first.

Please let me know if you have any questions, thank you.

Colleen Keller
Electronic Resources Librarian
EDUCAUSE - Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good

4772 Walnut Street, Suite 206
Boulder, CO 80301-2538
Phone (303) 939-0309

 

Message from luke.fernandez@gmail.com

I'm not a CIO.  But as Plato sometimes suggests the better scholars of leadership are not always its best practitioners ( which perhaps explains the lack of very many philosopher kings/queens in h.e. administration ).  With that disclaimer I'd recommend Langdon Winner's essay "Do artifacts have politics?".  Administration and technology, and their corollaries, bureaucracy and technocracy, are in some ways efforts to transcend politics and power.  But winner helps us think through whether administrators and technologists really succeed in that endeavor.  

Sent from my iPad

Message from shelf@westernu.edu

Just to throw some zest into the mix, I would suggest the following. Note most have to do with people and their motivations, rather than "the tech stuff":

  1. The Prince, by Machiavelli (http://goo.gl/0de21)
  2. The 48 Laws of Power, Greene (http://goo.gl/Or43v)
  3. How to Win Friends and Influence People, by Carnegie (http://goo.gl/ZHg2Z)
  4. Influence, Cialdini (http://goo.gl/kkUzw)
  5. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Covey (http://goo.gl/8Qq6m)
  6. Leading Geeks (http://goo.gl/odyC1)
  7. IT Governance, Ross (http://goo.gl/dCF4C)
  8. Rich Dad, Poor Dad, Kiyosaki (http://goo.gl/0Dc3v) -- this one is highly controversial, but, Kiyosaki's characterization of how the "poor, middle class, and rich" view money and the words they use to do so is very, very, insightful for negotiating budgets and contracts at a high level (including one's own!).

Big disclaimer: I'm not a CIO, but, I believe these books have given some insight into, without actually having the job, the demands of a CIO, vs., e.g., a CTO / entre / intrapreneur, and go into career and personal professional development with eyes wide open.

Also, you may want to check into the Center for Technology Leadership (http://goo.gl/QB0ZN), and Wayne Brown's vision and research, which, it seems, addresses the precise issue of how to educate the next generation of CIOs in higher education, (and they have a great reading list, to boot). Another disclaimer: I'm currently enrolled in this program, but, my honest assessment thus far is that the speakers and instructor (Sharon Blanton) we've had have given huge insights into the real work of a CIO.

Cheers,

Scott Helf, DO, MSIT
CTO-COMP
Western University of Health Sciences



From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] on behalf of Luke Fernandez [luke.fernandez@GMAIL.COM]
Sent: Monday, February 13, 2012 7:51 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] textbook search

I'm not a CIO.  But as Plato sometimes suggests the better scholars of leadership are not always its best practitioners ( which perhaps explains the lack of very many philosopher kings/queens in h.e. administration ).  With that disclaimer I'd recommend Langdon Winner's essay "Do artifacts have politics?".  Administration and technology, and their corollaries, bureaucracy and technocracy, are in some ways efforts to transcend politics and power.  But winner helps us think through whether administrators and technologists really succeed in that endeavor.  

Sent from my iPad

When I first started at the university, I found this to be insightful: The University: An Owner's Manual, Henry Rosovsky.


Message from bauer.rick@gmail.com

Another one is The New CIO Leader: Setting the Agenda and Delivering Results, but Marianne Broadbent and Ellen Kitzis (Gartner/Harvard Business Press). Not specifically education-focused, but good touch of all the salient areas.

Good input so far. My interest is on good books on the subject, but also on a subject that continues to appear from time to time, the professional licensure of the Chief Technology Officer of the organization. At CompTIA, where I work, we have been approached by both public and private sector entities about a CIO certification examination, something akin to a higher-end professional license. Right now, I am researching the possibilities, and looking at the interest level, and where there would be mandates to have such a certification or license. Here's some of the folks and programs I am looking at so far:

The Institute for CIO Excellence is led by Dr. Richard L. Routh (who wrote an excellent little book called "The Power of Role." Again, it is focused on a more corporate understanding of the CIO role in organizations, but he has over 30% of his students in academic and government CIO environments. Another notable program (in addition to the fine program at Excelsior previously cited) is at Carnegie Mellon (which also has a certificate program designed for CIO's who are pointed toward careers in government, but it still has a lot of "fit). Additional private programs at Gartner as well have called, but I need to check them out a bit more.

Do the "EDUCAUSE CIO's" (rough equivalent to the CIO's who frequent this listserve) have a stake in these discussions, or in shaping what a professional licensure examination might look like? I would argue "you bet!", but I am not sure at this point. I'd like to hear if that were something to explore, and as a vendor-neutral, non-profit certification body (we don't do training at all, just develop and manage ISO-compliant certifications and professional licenses for over 2 million IT professionals worldwide), I would welcome any feedback.

As envisioned, the CIO certification would not have ANY technical sections to it, but rather focus on areas that the CIO must manage in the technical infrastructure through his/her direct reports (the Technical Directors). The focus would be on leveraging technology to drive the core business activities of the organization (which in this case would be a hybrid of educational and business-like activities like finance, marketing, etc.).

I realize that the discussion started with books, and perhaps moved a bit afield when the CIO programs were discussed, so apologies out there if this discussion seems a bit tangential, but I was thinking about posting something after a few recent visits to some of these organizations, and discussions with faculty and students who seemed to want this kind of credential (in addition to an academic degree or school-specific certificate). Perhaps it would be something we could explore at a future EDUCAUSE activity or annual convention.

"Of the making of books there is no end, and much study wearies the body," King Solomon reportedly wrote, and I am certain that he was talking about CIO's, too.

Rick Bauer (former academic & corporate CIO)
Director of Research & Development
CompTIA
rbauer@comptia.org
certification.comptia.org





Message from shelf@westernu.edu

Excellent thoughts, and points, Rick!

 

Let me throw this out there:

 

·         Are there equivalent licensures for CTO, COO, CFO, CEO, President, or Chairman of the Board, etc.?

 

·         How about professors?

 

·         Should there be?

 

Why, then, should there be, for a CIO? Double-standard?

 

Tongue, just a bit, in cheek, but hopefully, making the point.

 

Thanks again for bringing this up: Important stuff to really cogitate on.

 

Respectfully,

 

Scott Helf, DO, MSIT

CTO-COMP

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Rick Bauer
Sent: Monday, February 13, 2012 10:53 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] textbook search

 

Another one is The New CIO Leader: Setting the Agenda and Delivering Results, but Marianne Broadbent and Ellen Kitzis (Gartner/Harvard Business Press). Not specifically education-focused, but good touch of all the salient areas.

Good input so far. My interest is on good books on the subject, but also on a subject that continues to appear from time to time, the professional licensure of the Chief Technology Officer of the organization. At CompTIA, where I work, we have been approached by both public and private sector entities about a CIO certification examination, something akin to a higher-end professional license. Right now, I am researching the possibilities, and looking at the interest level, and where there would be mandates to have such a certification or license. Here's some of the folks and programs I am looking at so far:

The Institute for CIO Excellence is led by Dr. Richard L. Routh (who wrote an excellent little book called "The Power of Role." Again, it is focused on a more corporate understanding of the CIO role in organizations, but he has over 30% of his students in academic and government CIO environments. Another notable program (in addition to the fine program at Excelsior previously cited) is at Carnegie Mellon (which also has a certificate program designed for CIO's who are pointed toward careers in government, but it still has a lot of "fit). Additional private programs at Gartner as well have called, but I need to check them out a bit more.

Do the "EDUCAUSE CIO's" (rough equivalent to the CIO's who frequent this listserve) have a stake in these discussions, or in shaping what a professional licensure examination might look like? I would argue "you bet!", but I am not sure at this point. I'd like to hear if that were something to explore, and as a vendor-neutral, non-profit certification body (we don't do training at all, just develop and manage ISO-compliant certifications and professional licenses for over 2 million IT professionals worldwide), I would welcome any feedback.

As envisioned, the CIO certification would not have ANY technical sections to it, but rather focus on areas that the CIO must manage in the technical infrastructure through his/her direct reports (the Technical Directors). The focus would be on leveraging technology to drive the core business activities of the organization (which in this case would be a hybrid of educational and business-like activities like finance, marketing, etc.).

I realize that the discussion started with books, and perhaps moved a bit afield when the CIO programs were discussed, so apologies out there if this discussion seems a bit tangential, but I was thinking about posting something after a few recent visits to some of these organizations, and discussions with faculty and students who seemed to want this kind of credential (in addition to an academic degree or school-specific certificate). Perhaps it would be something we could explore at a future EDUCAUSE activity or annual convention.

"Of the making of books there is no end, and much study wearies the body," King Solomon reportedly wrote, and I am certain that he was talking about CIO's, too.

Rick Bauer (former academic & corporate CIO)
Director of Research & Development
CompTIA
rbauer@comptia.org
certification.comptia.org




Message from bauer.rick@gmail.com

Good question.....I would say the CFO is probably a licensed accounting professional (CPA or other), the CEO is probably an MBA or other, CTO would have one of the over 1600 technology certifications out there, COO probably the MBA or equivalent, the Development Officer (fund raising/endowment/etc) has their own certification......but i think we also know of excellent corporate (or educational) officers who did not have these types of credentials.

President & Chairman normally coming from the ranks of the other corporate officers, with appropriate credentials, but nothing to credential their present work (outside of school- or organization-specific training and liability insurance training (where necessary). 

Message from slowe@1610group.com

It seems like such an undertaking would need to somehow quantify/take into account the vast differences that can exist between CIOs/CTOs between organizations. Even between CIOs/CTOs in the same system, the portfolio differences are significant as are the reporting relationships. Do you think it would be a positive or a negative to attempt to shoehorn a broad array of CIO types into a single compartment?

That said, it's a good way to get a baseline feel for the knowledge level of the chief technology officer, but agree that it may pose some double-standard issues in the organization.

Interesting challenge and discussion!

Scott Lowe
Founder and Managing Consultant
The 1610 Group

On Feb 13, 2012, at 1:05 PM, Scott Helf wrote:

Excellent thoughts, and points, Rick!
 
Let me throw this out there:
 
·         Are there equivalent licensures for CTO, COO, CFO, CEO, President, or Chairman of the Board, etc.?
 
·         How about professors?
 
·         Should there be?
 
Why, then, should there be, for a CIO? Double-standard?
 
Tongue, just a bit, in cheek, but hopefully, making the point.
 
Thanks again for bringing this up: Important stuff to really cogitate on.
 
Respectfully,
 
Scott Helf, DO, MSIT
CTO-COMP
 
 
 
From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Rick Bauer
Sent: Monday, February 13, 2012 10:53 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] textbook search
 

Another one is The New CIO Leader: Setting the Agenda and Delivering Results, but Marianne Broadbent and Ellen Kitzis (Gartner/Harvard Business Press). Not specifically education-focused, but good touch of all the salient areas. 

Good input so far. My interest is on good books on the subject, but also on a subject that continues to appear from time to time,the professional licensure of the Chief Technology Officer of the organization. At CompTIA, where I work, we have been approached by both public and private sector entities about a CIO certification examination, something akin to a higher-end professional license. Right now, I am researching the possibilities, and looking at the interest level, and where there would be mandates to have such a certification or license. Here's some of the folks and programs I am looking at so far:

The Institute for CIO Excellence is led by Dr. Richard L. Routh (who wrote an excellent little book called "The Power of Role." Again, it is focused on a more corporate understanding of the CIO role in organizations, but he has over 30% of his students in academic and government CIO environments. Another notable program (in addition to the fine program at Excelsior previously cited) is at Carnegie Mellon (which also has a certificate program designed for CIO's who are pointed toward careers in government, but it still has a lot of "fit). Additional private programs at Gartner as well have called, but I need to check them out a bit more.

Do the "EDUCAUSE CIO's" (rough equivalent to the CIO's who frequent this listserve) have a stake in these discussions, or in shaping what a professional licensure examination might look like? I would argue "you bet!", but I am not sure at this point. I'd like to hear if that were something to explore, and as a vendor-neutral, non-profit certification body (we don't do training at all, just develop and manage ISO-compliant certifications and professional licenses for over 2 million IT professionals worldwide), I would welcome any feedback.

As envisioned, the CIO certification would not have ANY technical sections to it, but rather focus on areas that the CIO must manage in the technical infrastructure through his/her direct reports (the Technical Directors). The focus would be on leveraging technology to drive the core business activities of the organization (which in this case would be a hybrid of educational and business-like activities like finance, marketing, etc.). 

I realize that the discussion started with books, and perhaps moved a bit afield when the CIO programs were discussed, so apologies out there if this discussion seems a bit tangential, but I was thinking about posting something after a few recent visits to some of these organizations, and discussions with faculty and students who seemed to want this kind of credential (in addition to an academic degree or school-specific certificate). Perhaps it would be something we could explore at a future EDUCAUSE activity or annual convention.

"Of the making of books there is no end, and much study wearies the body," King Solomon reportedly wrote, and I am certain that he was talking about CIO's, too.

Rick Bauer (former academic & corporate CIO)
Director of Research & Development
CompTIA
rbauer@comptia.org
certification.comptia.org




I am a former academic CIO. I am mostly an academic and now putting together academics and technology infrastructure at a new institution. My only paper credential is that of an anatomist. Yet, I have lectured extensively on and talked about the intersection about academics and technology. At the senior level, I don’t think a piece of paper means a whole lot. The role of CIO is that of an administrator who needs to understand some technology, some business, some finance, a lot of academics, and even more politics. I would argue that there is no requirement for any of the C-suite persons. Some may have a degree or certification; some may not. C-suite persons should be held to a simple standard: can they accomplish the mission of the University within their portfolio.

 

By the way, I understand enough technology that I can hire and manage the staff to handle it for the University. But my focus was – and is – on what it takes to accomplish the mission of the university. And having a tech certificate is probably not critical to doing so (having people who have the right certificates are; my having one is not). Certainly, when I hire someone to be my main lead in technology for my new institution, my focus is on their ability to accomplish what we need, not on what pieces of paper that person has.

                              

Sincerely,

 

Terence Ma, PhD

Associate Dean of Accreditation, Assessment, and Administration

Professor of Anatomy

California Northstate University College of Medicine

9700 West Taron Drive

Elk Grove, CA 95757

Ph: 916-686-7301

Fx: 916-686-7310

Terence.Ma@cnucom.org

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Rick Bauer
Sent: Monday, February 13, 2012 10:53 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] textbook search

 

Another one is The New CIO Leader: Setting the Agenda and Delivering Results, but Marianne Broadbent and Ellen Kitzis (Gartner/Harvard Business Press). Not specifically education-focused, but good touch of all the salient areas.

Good input so far. My interest is on good books on the subject, but also on a subject that continues to appear from time to time, the professional licensure of the Chief Technology Officer of the organization. At CompTIA, where I work, we have been approached by both public and private sector entities about a CIO certification examination, something akin to a higher-end professional license. Right now, I am researching the possibilities, and looking at the interest level, and where there would be mandates to have such a certification or license. Here's some of the folks and programs I am looking at so far:

The Institute for CIO Excellence is led by Dr. Richard L. Routh (who wrote an excellent little book called "The Power of Role." Again, it is focused on a more corporate understanding of the CIO role in organizations, but he has over 30% of his students in academic and government CIO environments. Another notable program (in addition to the fine program at Excelsior previously cited) is at Carnegie Mellon (which also has a certificate program designed for CIO's who are pointed toward careers in government, but it still has a lot of "fit). Additional private programs at Gartner as well have called, but I need to check them out a bit more.

Do the "EDUCAUSE CIO's" (rough equivalent to the CIO's who frequent this listserve) have a stake in these discussions, or in shaping what a professional licensure examination might look like? I would argue "you bet!", but I am not sure at this point. I'd like to hear if that were something to explore, and as a vendor-neutral, non-profit certification body (we don't do training at all, just develop and manage ISO-compliant certifications and professional licenses for over 2 million IT professionals worldwide), I would welcome any feedback.

As envisioned, the CIO certification would not have ANY technical sections to it, but rather focus on areas that the CIO must manage in the technical infrastructure through his/her direct reports (the Technical Directors). The focus would be on leveraging technology to drive the core business activities of the organization (which in this case would be a hybrid of educational and business-like activities like finance, marketing, etc.).

I realize that the discussion started with books, and perhaps moved a bit afield when the CIO programs were discussed, so apologies out there if this discussion seems a bit tangential, but I was thinking about posting something after a few recent visits to some of these organizations, and discussions with faculty and students who seemed to want this kind of credential (in addition to an academic degree or school-specific certificate). Perhaps it would be something we could explore at a future EDUCAUSE activity or annual convention.

"Of the making of books there is no end, and much study wearies the body," King Solomon reportedly wrote, and I am certain that he was talking about CIO's, too.

Rick Bauer (former academic & corporate CIO)
Director of Research & Development
CompTIA
rbauer@comptia.org
certification.comptia.org




Thanks, everyone, for your helpful replies. I think I'll have plenty to chew on for the next couple of months - or years ;-)

Take care...

Matt
---------------------------------------------
Matthew Putz, Ed.D.
Director of Teaching and Learning Technology
Bethel University (http://www.bethel.edu)
(651) 638-6467




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