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Message from shailey.minocha@gmail.com

We have conducted research on the design of learning spaces in 3D virtual environments (e.g. Second Life). We have noted in our research that design principles of 3D learning spaces are influenced by the design of physical learning spaces. We have also noted that there is a potential of influencing the design of physical learning spaces through the study of user interactions in 3D spaces. Have you come across this or do you have any thoughts about this? Many thanks & regards, Shailey ----------------------------------- Dr. Shailey Minocha Department of Computing The Open University Walton Hall Milton Keynes MK7 6AA United Kingdom skype: shailey.minocha Second Life: Shailey Garfield publications: http://oro.open.ac.uk/view/person/sm577.html profile: http://uk.linkedin.com/in/shaileyminocha ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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Although I'd expect real-world physical space and design would influence virtual world space, I would be very interested in exploring more how virtual world space and design might affect real-world space.
 
Scagnoli, Buki, & Johnson (2009) made a similar observation regarding classroom and online teaching. While classroom teaching experiences often influence online teaching, the researchers described how experienced classroom instructors changed their classroom teaching practices because of their online teaching experiences.
 
Also, Stephanie Gerald and I wrote a article for EDUCAUSE (Gerald & Antonacci, 2009) about virtual world learning spaces, which you might find useful.
 
"One approach to developing a virtual world educational island is similar to a traditional approach to developing real-world learning spaces: Areas are developed to support broadly defined educational activities. These virtual areas typically include a large lecture hall or auditorium for presentations, smaller classrooms for discussion, a sandbox for student building, and an exhibition hall for displaying student work. However, this real-world approach to virtual world learning space brings with it similar constraints on the types of teaching and learning that can happen in those spaces. For example, large lecture halls, whether in the real world or the virtual world, are based on objectivist transmissive teaching; once built, such spaces do little to support more collaborative and constructivist learning approaches.4
 
Because it is so easy and inexpensive to develop and modify user-created virtual worlds, especially when compared to the real world, we suggest an alternative approach to developing virtual world learning spaces. Instead of anticipating possible educational needs and trying to develop flexible learning spaces for those possible needs, virtual world learning spaces can be developed for very specific instructional needs. Although KUMC Isle, our private island in Second Life, does have a few familiar learning spaces — an auditorium, a sandbox, and a beach area — the majority of our island is devoted to specific course projects: a home to practice assessing and remediating disability issues, a community living center as the context for database development, and an operating room simulation for learning complex medical procedures."
 
Dave
 
David M. Antonacci, PhD
Director of Teaching & Learning Technologies
University of Kansas Medical Center
(913) 588-7144
 
 
Gerald, S. P. & Antonacci, D. M. (2009). Virtual world learning spaces: Developing a Second Life operating room simulation. EDUCAUSE Quarterly, 32(1). Available at http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Quarterly/EDUCAUSEQuarterlyMagazineVolum/VirtualWorldLearningSpacesDeve/163851.
 
Scagnoli, N. I., Buki, L. P., & Johnson, S. D. (2009). The influence of online teaching on face-to-face teaching practices. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 13(2), 115-128.

>>> Shailey Minocha <shailey.minocha@GMAIL.COM> 3/8/2012 2:03 AM >>>
Hello:

We have conducted research on the design of learning spaces in 3D virtual environments (e.g. Second Life). We have noted in our research that design principles of 3D learning spaces are influenced by the design of physical learning spaces. We have also noted that there is a potential of influencing the design of physical learning spaces through the study of user interactions in 3D spaces.

Have you come across this or do you have any thoughts about this?
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

I saw an interesting presentation at the New Media Consortium conference in 2009 - Second Life was used for some of the planning for a library at Yale.  See:

Joan
----------
Joan K. Lippincott, Ph.D.
Associate Executive Director
Coalition for Networked Information
21 Dupont Circle, Suite 800
Washington, DC  20036
202-296-5098
202-872-0884 (Fax)

Message from shailey.minocha@gmail.com

Hello Joan:

Thank you. 

I have found an article on the project that you have mentioned: http://virtualworlds.nmc.org/portfolio/mudd-library/

Regards,

Shailey


On 8 Mar 2012, at 15:36, Joan K. Lippincott wrote:

I saw an interesting presentation at the New Media Consortium conference in 2009 - Second Life was used for some of the planning for a library at Yale.  See:

Joan
----------
Joan K. Lippincott, Ph.D.
Associate Executive Director
Coalition for Networked Information
21 Dupont Circle, Suite 800
Washington, DC  20036
202-296-5098
202-872-0884 (Fax)

Message from shailey.minocha@gmail.com

Hello David: Thank you for your thoughts and pointers to papers. Influence of physical learning spaces on the design of 3D virtual spaces: Thank you for a link to your paper. As discussed in your paper, we have also encountered several design features in 3D learning spaces (in Second Life) and particularly for navigation and wayfinding that were influenced by the design of physical spaces. A snapshot of our navigation and wayfinding research in 3D VWs is in this paper: http://oro.open.ac.uk/29864/ This paper does not explicitly discuss the influences as that was not the focus of the paper but you will note that our guidelines for 3D spaces have been informed by the design principles for navigation and wayfinding in physical spaces. This paper might also be of interest. It discusses how face-to-face teaching/ethos had influenced the design of online discussion forums: Yu-Mei Wang A1 and Derthanq Victor Chen, Instructors as Architects—Designing Learning Spaces for Discussion-Based Online Courses, Journal of Educational Technology Systems, Issue: Volume 39, Number 3 / 2010-2011, Pages: 281 - 294. Influence of experiences of user interactions in 3D spaces on the design of physical learning spaces. I was not aware of Scagnoli, et al. 2009 paper which I have found very interesting. Thank you for advising me of this resource. In our research, we were not looking at how experiences in 3D spaces influence the design of physical learning spaces. I plan to look at the data again with this 'lens' if I can find any example. I do, however, remember an educator who teaches Design mentioning to us (in our investigations) that how his experience of open workshop-style sandboxes for students to practice and to look at each other's design projects in Second Life led him to use a similar room with minimal furniture in real-life where students could come and work in a design studio and leave their artefacts around for other students to comment on and reflect. Thanks again for your inputs. Regards, Shailey On 8 Mar 2012, at 15:21, David Antonacci wrote: > Although I'd expect real-world physical space and design would influence virtual world space, I would be very interested in exploring more how virtual world space and design might affect real-world space. > > Scagnoli, Buki, & Johnson (2009) made a similar observation regarding classroom and online teaching. While classroom teaching experiences often influence online teaching, the researchers described how experienced classroom instructors changed their classroom teaching practices because of their online teaching experiences. > > Also, Stephanie Gerald and I wrote a article for EDUCAUSE (Gerald & Antonacci, 2009) about virtual world learning spaces, which you might find useful. > > "One approach to developing a virtual world educational island is similar to a traditional approach to developing real-world learning spaces: Areas are developed to support broadly defined educational activities. These virtual areas typically include a large lecture hall or auditorium for presentations, smaller classrooms for discussion, a sandbox for student building, and an exhibition hall for displaying student work. However, this real-world approach to virtual world learning space brings with it similar constraints on the types of teaching and learning that can happen in those spaces. For example, large lecture halls, whether in the real world or the virtual world, are based on objectivist transmissive teaching; once built, such spaces do little to support more collaborative and constructivist learning approaches.4 > > Because it is so easy and inexpensive to develop and modify user-created virtual worlds, especially when compared to the real world, we suggest an alternative approach to developing virtual world learning spaces. Instead of anticipating possible educational needs and trying to develop flexible learning spaces for those possible needs, virtual world learning spaces can be developed for very specific instructional needs. Although KUMC Isle, our private island in Second Life, does have a few familiar learning spaces — an auditorium, a sandbox, and a beach area — the majority of our island is devoted to specific course projects: a home to practice assessing and remediating disability issues, a community living center as the context for database development, and an operating room simulation for learning complex medical procedures." > > Dave > > David M. Antonacci, PhD > Director of Teaching & Learning Technologies > University of Kansas Medical Center > (913) 588-7144 > > > Gerald, S. P. & Antonacci, D. M. (2009). Virtual world learning spaces: Developing a Second Life operating room simulation. EDUCAUSE Quarterly, 32(1). Available at http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Quarterly/EDUCAUSEQuarterlyMagazineVolu.... > > Scagnoli, N. I., Buki, L. P., & Johnson, S. D. (2009). The influence of online teaching on face-to-face teaching practices. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 13(2), 115-128. > > >>> Shailey Minocha 3/8/2012 2:03 AM >>> > Hello: > > We have conducted research on the design of learning spaces in 3D virtual environments (e.g. Second Life). We have noted in our research that design principles of 3D learning spaces are influenced by the design of physical learning spaces. We have also noted that there is a potential of influencing the design of physical learning spaces through the study of user interactions in 3D spaces. > > Have you come across this or do you have any thoughts about this? ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Greetings Shailey

I've been interested in this approach for some time – about 10 years ago I was looking at it in my doctorate.  Later a young games designer approached me in London (2 or 3 years ago) – he had just won an award for digital design of learning materials – re establishing a 3D visualising tool for learning environments, modelling the 2nd life approach but in a stand alone 'tool'.

The advantage of stand alone was that a 3D building could be inserted without having to pay 2nd life to build it for you.

We found a couple of educational investors in the UK (to supplement our own startup costs, which were significant) including the London Institute of Education and the Birmingham County Council who had a GBP1.5 billion schools building program – at the time there was a massive school building program circa GBP5bn per annum for 10 years – and developed an Alpha model with four case studies operating, fully furnished with avatars able to rearrange furniture and also insert new furniture types.  The furniture is based on manufactured products by suppliers. The idea was to have teachers and students use the tool and comment on design features – the architecture itself and the loose furniture, fittings and equipment being included in the project.  Tehcnology was also included e.g. Smart boards, projection and laptops/computers etc.

We intended to use LEVROS (the Learning Environments Virtual Reality Online Simulator) as a design tool, as a continuing professional development tool (teachers generally are skeptical re innovative learning environments and serious change management is needed) and also as an evaluation tool.

The Tories won the UK election in 2010 and the major building programme was stopped and so all our sponsors lost their funds and our product also stopped in development (this also coincided with the fallout from the GFC).  Since then the games designer has been working in Defence (where I also do some work as it is Australia's largest registered training organisation and they have signalled they need more education to supplement the training) where he has been developing 3D models of submarines so that submariners can be trained in emergency procedures etc etc without having to go undersea.  This resonates with pilot training in simulators and also nursing and medical procedures for surgeons and also in telemedicine.

I now ask the question – would you fly in a plane piloted by someone who has not been trained in a simulator?  Or be operated on by a surgeon who has not had simulation training (also given that surgery is increasingly done through micro cameras and with minimal intervention).  Maybe one should ask – should we be taught in a 'classroom' by someone who has not been trained in a simulator?  That is going to the extreme but you will get my drift.

I have been more than a bit frustrated that LEVROS did not reach the point where it could be launched and used in evidence-based design, which is my research area now.

On a related note I have used model making as a key way of teachers and students understanding at a deeper level the spatiality of things.  The hands-on activity of building a model – I call them doll's house models as you can lift the roof and see what is happening inside – asks the model builder to make decisions about matters spatial.  Teachers and students have had the 'aha' moment in this process with some wonderful outcomes resulting.

My particular research interest is in 'spatial literacy' (New London Group circa 1996; Gardner 2006) and I think it is a lack of this in teachers and lecturers that holds us back from doing something on the same scale as has been evident with the Industrial Revolution classroom, which still rules after 150 years or so.  At this late stage of my career I can see significant advances in individual innovative examples, but not scaled up, so to speak.

Happy to continue a discussion if you are in this 'space'.  See our Learning Environments Action Research Network centre details below.  It is a partnership between the Faculty of Education, Faculty of Architecture and Educational Authorities/Procurement Chain providers.

Rgds

Kenn

Dr Kenn Fisher
Associate Professor in Learning Environments

Learning Environments (Action) Research Network, 
Future Proofing Schools & Smart Green Schools Projects

Room 502, Architecture Building
Faculty of Architecture, Building & Planning
University of Melbourne VIC 3010
AUSTRALIA
 
M: 0400040254
E: fisherk@unimelb.edu.au 
W: www.abp.unimelb.edu.au 









From: Shailey Minocha <shailey.minocha@GMAIL.COM>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Learning Space Design Constituent Group Listserv <LEARNINGSPACE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2012 11:14:47 +0000
To: <LEARNINGSPACE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [LEARNINGSPACE] Learning spaces in 3D virtual environments

Hello David:

Thank you for your thoughts and pointers to papers.

Influence of physical learning spaces on the design of 3D virtual spaces:

Thank you for a link to your paper. As discussed in your paper, we have also encountered several design features in 3D learning spaces (in Second Life) and particularly for navigation and wayfinding that were influenced by the design of physical spaces. A snapshot of our navigation and wayfinding research in 3D VWs is in this paper: http://oro.open.ac.uk/29864/ This paper does not explicitly discuss the influences as that was not the focus of the paper but you will note that our guidelines for 3D spaces have been informed by the design principles for navigation and wayfinding in physical spaces.

This paper might also be of interest. It discusses how face-to-face teaching/ethos had influenced the design of online discussion forums: Yu-Mei Wang A1 and Derthanq Victor Chen, Instructors as Architects—Designing Learning Spaces for Discussion-Based Online Courses, Journal of Educational Technology Systems, Issue: Volume 39, Number 3 / 2010-2011, Pages: 281 - 294.

Influence of experiences of user interactions in 3D spaces on the design of physical learning spaces.

I was not aware of Scagnoli, et al. 2009 paper which I have found very interesting. Thank you for advising me of this resource.

In our research, we were not looking at how experiences in 3D spaces influence the design of physical learning spaces. I plan to look at the data again with this 'lens' if I can find any example. I do, however, remember an educator who teaches Design mentioning to us (in our investigations) that how his experience of open workshop-style sandboxes for students to practice and to look at each other's design projects in Second Life led him to use a similar room with minimal furniture in real-life where students could come and work in a design studio and leave their artefacts around for other students to comment on and reflect.

Thanks again for your inputs.

Regards,

Shailey
  

On 8 Mar 2012, at 15:21, David Antonacci wrote:

Although I'd expect real-world physical space and design would influence virtual world space, I would be very interested in exploring more how virtual world space and design might affect real-world space.
  
Scagnoli, Buki, & Johnson (2009) made a similar observation regarding classroom and online teaching. While classroom teaching experiences often influence online teaching, the researchers described how experienced classroom instructors changed their classroom teaching practices because of their online teaching experiences.
  
Also, Stephanie Gerald and I wrote a article for EDUCAUSE (Gerald & Antonacci, 2009) about virtual world learning spaces, which you might find useful.
  
"One approach to developing a virtual world educational island is similar to a traditional approach to developing real-world learning spaces: Areas are developed to support broadly defined educational activities. These virtual areas typically include a large lecture hall or auditorium for presentations, smaller classrooms for discussion, a sandbox for student building, and an exhibition hall for displaying student work. However, this real-world approach to virtual world learning space brings with it similar constraints on the types of teaching and learning that can happen in those spaces. For example, large lecture halls, whether in the real world or the virtual world, are based on objectivist transmissive teaching; once built, such spaces do little to support more collaborative and constructivist learning approaches.4
  
Because it is so easy and inexpensive to develop and modify user-created virtual worlds, especially when compared to the real world, we suggest an alternative approach to developing virtual world learning spaces. Instead of anticipating possible educational needs and trying to develop flexible learning spaces for those possible needs, virtual world learning spaces can be developed for very specific instructional needs. Although KUMC Isle, our private island in Second Life, does have a few familiar learning spaces — an auditorium, a sandbox, and a beach area — the majority of our island is devoted to specific course projects: a home to practice assessing and remediating disability issues, a community living center as the context for database development, and an operating room simulation for learning complex medical procedures."
  
Dave
  
David M. Antonacci, PhD
Director of Teaching & Learning Technologies
University of Kansas Medical Center
(913) 588-7144
  
  
Gerald, S. P. & Antonacci, D. M. (2009). Virtual world learning spaces: Developing a Second Life operating room simulation. EDUCAUSE Quarterly, 32(1). Available at http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Quarterly/EDUCAUSEQuarterlyMagazineVolum/VirtualWorldLearningSpacesDeve/163851.
  
Scagnoli, N. I., Buki, L. P., & Johnson, S. D. (2009). The influence of online teaching on face-to-face teaching practices. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 13(2), 115-128.
>>> Shailey Minocha <shailey.minocha@GMAIL.COM> 3/8/2012 2:03 AM >>>
Hello:
We have conducted research on the design of learning spaces in 3D virtual environments (e.g. Second Life). We have noted in our research that design principles of 3D learning spaces are influenced by the design of physical learning spaces. We have also noted that there is a potential of influencing the design of physical learning spaces through the study of user interactions in 3D spaces.
Have you come across this or do you have any thoughts about this?

**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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