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It looks like Instructure is getting into MOOCs with https://www.canvas.net/



It looks like the target use case for these courses are existing Canvas clients, and Instructure's goal is to provide a new entry point for LMS customers. I suspect Blackboard is trying to do the same with CourseSites, but I don't know, Canvas just seems…. Friendlier? 

What do you all think? Any Canvas users out there that might offer their course through canvas.net?

--
Jason Blanchard
Instructional Designer

School of Education
Goodwin College of Professional Studies
Drexel University
One Drexel Plaza
3001 Market Street, Suite 100
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Tel: 215-571-3927 |  Fax: 215.895.2153
Drexel.edu/soe
Goodwin.drexel.edu
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Blackboard has formally sponsored a set of Open Courses on CourseSites.  You can access them at https://open.coursesites.com/

We've put together a short, friendly, video explaining how to get started hosting your own open course on CourseSItes.


Open Courses taught on CourseSites can be published under a Creative Commons license and made available in the Common Cartridge Format so the materials can be re-used in any LMS.  

We also made changes to the Blackboard license last year to allow customers to provide access to non-fee courses to users for free in support of open education initiatives.

If you want to learn more about using MOOCs with Blackboard either through CourseSites, or on your campus, my colleague, Sarah Bishop-Root will be at Educause next week to answer your questions. 

John Fontaine



Thanks for sharing this, John.

I wonder how companies like Blackboard and Canvas' entrance to the MOOC world will he received by users? 

On the one hand, it may reduce overhead for institutions interested in opening their content up to the world. This is great for instructors, administrators and IT staff.

On the other hand, courses delivered in these platforms may not meet the needs or interests of MOOC users. In other words, systems like Canvas and Blackboard may propagate an "inside-the-box" approach to large-scale open courses that may not appeal to learners taking the course without an expectation of credit or certification. I think some of the interest in courses on Udacity, Edx, etc. is precisely because they are not Blackboard or Canvas courses. Also, since these platforms are newer, they can more easily adapt to features that work well for MOOCs, but aren't as important to "enterprise" LMSs. These established platforms with enterprise-level stakeholders may not be able to make the pivots necessary for trailblazing in MOOC spaces.

--
Jason Blanchard
Instructional Designer

School of Education
Goodwin College of Professional Studies
Drexel University
One Drexel Plaza
3001 Market Street, Suite 100
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Tel: 215-571-3927 |  Fax: 215.895.2153
Drexel.edu/soe
Goodwin.drexel.edu

From: John Fontaine <john.fontaine@ME.COM>
Reply-To: "The EDUCAUSE Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) Constituent Group Listserv" <MOOCS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
To: "MOOCS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <MOOCS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [MOOCS] Canvas.net

Blackboard has formally sponsored a set of Open Courses on CourseSites.  You can access them at https://open.coursesites.com/

We've put together a short, friendly, video explaining how to get started hosting your own open course on CourseSItes.


Open Courses taught on CourseSites can be published under a Creative Commons license and made available in the Common Cartridge Format so the materials can be re-used in any LMS.  

We also made changes to the Blackboard license last year to allow customers to provide access to non-fee courses to users for free in support of open education initiatives.

If you want to learn more about using MOOCs with Blackboard either through CourseSites, or on your campus, my colleague, Sarah Bishop-Root will be at Educause next week to answer your questions. 

John Fontaine



Thus far our entry into this space has been fairly well received.   We started with our first open course in May with Curtis Bonk, and have had some follow on courses this fall.  There have been some critics, but overall response has been highly supportive.  We constantly survey our course participants to measure satisfaction, and at the moment satisfaction is high.  You can visit our website and read some testimonials here: http://bit.ly/RuHRXD 

The success we've had has enabled us to build some partnerships with  Universities which were reported on today:
 

On your second question, we're working hard to eliminate the inside the box feeling that many have described with regard to the traditional on-campus LMS.  We've streamlined access to materials, and integrated authentication with existing Internet identities like Facebook, LinkedIn and Google.  We've set default options in courses that make it easy to publish materials and share out as links or in formats like Common Cartridge.  We've made it easy to integrate materials from existing blogs, YouTube, Google and Flikr into the course experience.

Traditional LMS' may have an advantage over the new MOOC platforms in that we can rely on an existing set of LMS capabilities.  Newer entrants must create a quiz engine, grade book and  content management functionality anew.  In contrast my team can focus on workflows and problems unique to MOOCs such as: open signup & registration, large scale information management, and community management.

As someone who is passionate about open education I'm hopeful that all of these MOOC initiatives within ed tech will continue to evolve and grow.  We are still in the very early days of this technology.  We've gone from the pioneering days of George Siemens and David Wiley to the era when products built around these ideas are emerging.  I hope that Blackboard and I personally can make a positive contribution to this moment.

Thanks,

John Fontaine


Fascinating move.  Naturally the major commercial LMS players want to enter this emerging MOOC field.  Google has already put a toe in that water.

I wonder if noncommercial, open source projects will hit the MOOC world: Moodle, Sakai.


Well, they were given advance notice that this was happening. Martin Dougiamas was in the front row when i delivered this: http://www.downes.ca/presentation/276

-- Stephen

On 01/11/2012 5:01 PM, Bryan Alexander wrote:
Fascinating move.  Naturally the major commercial LMS players want to enter this emerging MOOC field.  Google has already put a toe in that water. I wonder if noncommercial, open source projects will hit the MOOC world: Moodle, Sakai.

Stephen Downes
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
stephen@downes.ca ~ http://www.downes.ca
Free Learning
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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