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Wednesday
Jan 20th, 2010
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Governor's Ballroom C (fourth floor)
Mountain Time
Through rapid "lightning round" introductions, campus practitioners will share how they are leveraging today's technologies to create mobile and virtual learning environments. Learn about their process for experimentation and assessment and find out how these innovators are targeting student success with emerging technologies.

During the first half hour of each hour-long session, presenters will share a 10-minute overview of their project. The second half hour is designed for informal interaction with these innovators so you can follow up, learn more, and make connections.

Mobile Learning Initiatives at UT Austin's Learning Technology Center
The Learning Technology Center (LTC) at The University of Texas at Austin has been examining how mobile devices including smartphones, PDAs, iPod Touches, iPhones, and netbooks can be effectively leveraged to support learning within and beyond the classroom. In doing so, the college has provided iPod Touches to two cohorts of preservice teachers (who already have a laptop requirement) in order to compare the pedagogical affordances of such devices to laptops. LTC representatives will demonstrate open-source, commercial, and internally developed software, along with classroom practices, that enable instant access to information; collaboration; peer review, evaluation, and feedback; and location-aware learning activities.

Mobile Learning: The Classroom, the Campus, and the World in the Student's Pocket
Mobile devices offer opportunities for providing experiential and relevant educational activities for learners. The University of Maryland is conducting an iPhone/iPod Touch pilot that is exploring how these technologies can enhance the student education experience. We will explore the use of various mobile devices in teaching and learning and will delve into the roles of both the instructor and the learner. There will be discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of using various applications for teaching and learning.

Who Gives a Flip? Outcomes from a Large-Scale Distribution of Flip Video Cameras
Over the past two years, the Duke Digital Initiative provided Flip cameras to faculty and students who applied for grants and created a large "loaner" pool of Flip cameras for faculty members or students. Access to easy and portable video capture resulted in a dramatic increase in the number of academic video projects on campus. This session will provide an overview of the Flip distribution, share survey results and outcomes, and explore a variety of course projects using the Flips to better understand how they're being used in, and outside, the classroom.

Speakers