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Message from paire@temple.edu

Hi,

 

I was wondering if anyone has any policies/standards that clearly make the distinction between responsibility of the faculty member vs Disabled Student Services in providing alternate formats for instructional materials. 

 

I went to the DOIT site and read through the California Community Colleges guidelines, the U Mich SSD Faculty Handbook, both of which are nice, but don’t really seem to state a clear distinction between how much work the faculty have to do to make materials accessible and when they should hand it off to Disabled Student Services.   The Univ of Montana Expect Success handbook, and the Cal Poly Instructional Materials checklist seems to indicate that the faculty do everything.

 

It sounds like depending on the institution either Disabled Student Services does all the conversions, or none of them (and the faculty are responsible for doing all the conversions); but that can’t be right…. Can it? 

 

Is there an institution that has a DSS office that does conversions (or gets an accessible version via something like AccessText) for large works (i.e. textbooks) but leaves the smaller works (i.e. 10 page class handouts) to the faculty members?  And if so, can you point me to their policies/procedures? 

 

Thanks,

 

-Paul

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Hi Paul, As with almost everything, there will be exceptions, but this basically defines the responsibilities of faculty members and our Disability Services Office here at NC State. Faculty members are responsible for creating electronic content that is transformable into other formats. For example, the faculty member is responsible for creating the the Microsoft Word document accessibly, but the faculty member is not responsible for transforming that document into braille. The Disability Services Office will transform the document to an alternate format, or when possible and depending on the format needed, the student can even take the accessible document and transform it into the appropriate format they need. Disability Services will not make the faculty member's Microsoft Word document accessible for them. I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions. Greg -- Greg Kraus University IT Accessibility Coordinator NC State University 919.513.4087 greg_kraus@ncsu.edu
Message from paire@temple.edu

Greg,

Thanks for the response.  How do you handle photocopied documents that are used as handouts (particularly when it's a bad photocopy and chunks of text are illegible even to a sighted user, like what happens when photocopying a book and it can't lay flat and some text is out of focus and there's big black triangles where the light didn't reach into the binding)?  Or when the photocopy has images in it?

What happens when the electronic documents (word, ppt, etc.) have images without alt tags or other accessibility barriers?

Thanks again,

-Paul

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Greg Kraus <greg_kraus@NCSU.EDU> wrote:

Hi Paul,

As with almost everything, there will be exceptions, but this
basically defines the responsibilities of faculty members and our
Disability Services Office here at NC State. Faculty members are
responsible for creating electronic content that is transformable into
other formats. For example, the faculty member is responsible for
creating the the Microsoft Word document accessibly, but the faculty
member is not responsible for transforming that document into braille.
The Disability Services Office will transform the document to an
alternate format, or when possible and depending on the format needed,
the student can even take the accessible document and transform it
into the appropriate format they need. Disability Services will not
make the faculty member's Microsoft Word document accessible for them.

I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions.

Greg

--
Greg Kraus
University IT Accessibility Coordinator
NC State University
919.513.4087
greg_kraus@ncsu.edu


Hi, I can offer a little bit to this conversation from what I do, commercial product review/analysis and, application/procurement.

This is not a specific recommendation of one product (however I'm only listing one example)- please shop around consider this a conceptual suggestion - A suggestion I suspect you-all have tried to 'sell' to your campuses but, the software products in past were either too sketchy or, expensive. Anyone is welcome to contact me offline for further conversation.

The 'need' is obvious -ensure Campus documents - received or created as non-accessible pdf or other format, may be made accessible to screen readers and retain as much of the original formatting as possible e.g.; Faculty Class Readers from multiple formats, pdf, Word files, Print Journals (etc.), or, Textbooks at purchase. Add in, having the end product distributed directly to end-users (even on Smart Phones) at point of creation or, post purchase. Having papers read to you while commuting is a nice sell point for EVERY BODY.


Recognize that OCR scanning isn't likely to catch 100% of all goofs and page formatting from photocopies - 80 + percent does lessen the human interactive workload. We found even unbelievable goofs (could share examples) were corrected in less than second and or a short few per.page.


 Software

OmTool Enterprise Document capture and Routing Solution

http://www.omtool.com/images/accuRouteDiagram2.jpg

Source Url:

http://www.omtool.com/products/accuroute.cfm

 

Quicktime Demo. (takes forever to load !)

Check out Omtool's quick online AccuRoute demo.

 

Bill Grubaugh MS HF/E
SFSU
From: The EDUCAUSE IT Accessibility Constituent Group Listserv [ITACCESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] on behalf of Paul E. Paire [paire@TEMPLE.EDU]
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2012 4:15 AM
To: ITACCESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITACCESS] Accessible Instructional Materials

Greg,

Thanks for the response.  How do you handle photocopied documents that are used as handouts (particularly when it's a bad photocopy and chunks of text are illegible even to a sighted user, like what happens when photocopying a book and it can't lay flat and some text is out of focus and there's big black triangles where the light didn't reach into the binding)?  Or when the photocopy has images in it?

What happens when the electronic documents (word, ppt, etc.) have images without alt tags or other accessibility barriers?

Thanks again,

-Paul

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Greg Kraus <greg_kraus@NCSU.EDU> wrote:

Hi Paul,

As with almost everything, there will be exceptions, but this
basically defines the responsibilities of faculty members and our
Disability Services Office here at NC State. Faculty members are
responsible for creating electronic content that is transformable into
other formats. For example, the faculty member is responsible for
creating the the Microsoft Word document accessibly, but the faculty
member is not responsible for transforming that document into braille.
The Disability Services Office will transform the document to an
alternate format, or when possible and depending on the format needed,
the student can even take the accessible document and transform it
into the appropriate format they need. Disability Services will not
make the faculty member's Microsoft Word document accessible for them.

I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions.

Greg

--
Greg Kraus
University IT Accessibility Coordinator
NC State University
919.513.4087
greg_kraus@ncsu.edu


Hi Paul, > How do you handle photocopied documents that are > used as handouts (particularly when it's a bad photocopy and chunks of text > are illegible even to a sighted user, like what happens when photocopying a > book and it can't lay flat and some text is out of focus and there's big > black triangles where the light didn't reach into the binding)? Or when the > photocopy has images in it? To address some of the specifics first, our library offers scanning services for all course related content. The faculty member simply submits the journal, article, book, etc., and the library will scan it and automatically run OCR on it. They do have a scanner that compensates for books that cannot lay flat. It's about the size of a refrigerator, but it's pretty cool. I'm not sure if that is the one they use for their production work in those cases, but I know they have it, and it's actually available for any person on campus to walk up to and use. As to the larger issue of how do you handle bad original copies, that can be tricky and can be handled in a couple of different ways depending on the context. I think one of the first steps is to try and find the original, if possible. If that isn't possible, something would have to be agreed upon between our DSO office and the faculty member in terms of what to provide the student. (Just as a note, I do not work in our DSO office so I am not part of that process.) It might mean that OCR has to be run on the bad copy and the cleaned up by the faculty member. It might mean the document has to be recreated in another format some how. If a scan has images, alternative text would need to be provided if the image is important. That would usually be up to the faculty member. Greg > > What happens when the electronic documents (word, ppt, etc.) have images > without alt tags or other accessibility barriers? In the case of Microsoft Office documents, the faculty member would need to add in the appropriate accessibility information. Greg ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Sorry, Forgot to add that the OCR software and document routing software can be fitted to common photocopy machines (RICHO Cannon, XEROX, Brother etc in libraries, bookstores, Offices etc) and books scanners so the otherwise inaccessible image copies can be made mpst anywhere and specificly sent to various users or document compilation service centers. Bill ________________________________________
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