Main Nav

ECAR Study of Students and Information Technology, 2005: Convenience, Connection, Control, and Learning

Wednesday, October 12, 2005

Abstract

A longitudinal extension of the 2004 ECAR study of students and information technology, this 2005 study is based on quantitative data from more than 18,000 freshman and senior students at 63 higher education institutions. It focuses on what kinds of information technologies today's students are using, with what levels of skill they are using them, how IT use contributes to the undergraduate experience, and what value the use of IT adds in terms of learning. The study also provides a review of and comparison with the 2004 ECAR study of students and IT and the 2003 ECAR study of faculty use of course management systems undertaken at the University of Wisconsin System.

Table of Contents
Entire Study ECAR Study of Students and Information Technology, 2005: Convenience, Connection, Control, and Learning
  Foreword
Ch. 1 Executive Summary
Ch. 2 Methodology and Respondent Characteristics
Ch. 3 Student Use and Skill with Information Technology
Ch. 4 Information Technology in Courses
Ch. 5 The Promise and Performance of Course Management Systems
Ch. 6 A Little Wind Ruffling the Curtains at Dawn
Appendix A References
Appendix B Acknowledgments
Appendix C 2005 Survey Questionnaire
Appendix D Qualitative Interview Questions
Appendix E Participating Institutions and Respondent Characteristics
Case Studies
Digital Recollections
Online Supporting Materials
Key Findings
Roadmap
Survey Instrument

Download This Resource